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ITO-DAY'S SPORTING.I

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THE HEALTH OF MR GLADSTONE.

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ITO-DAY'S POLICE. I

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GLAMORGANSHIRE QUARTER SESSIONS. Trials of Prisoners. THIS DAY. The trials of prisoners at the Epiphany sessions for the countyot Glamorgan were resumed at the Town-hall, Cardiff, to-day. FIRST COURT. (Before Mr R. O. JONES and Colonel LEE.) WOUNDING BY A BOY. Ephraiin Owen Jones, a boy, on bail, was indicted for maliciously wounding Geor J olm, at Irtbyr Tydvii, on the 27th December.—Mr David Lewis i)roectited.-It appeared from the opening of the learned counsel that on the day named pro- Mcntor, a boy, witnessed a quarrel outside of the Royal Oak public-house, George town, Merthyr, between prisoner and a boy who had only one arm. Prisoner pushed this lad about, whereupon prosecutor struck at the prisoner, who retaliated by drawing a knife and stabbing the prosecutor upon the arm. It transpired that the prisoner and several other boys had been drinking together in a public-house urior to this occurrence. On being charged with the offeuce by the police prisoner admitted that he cut the piosecutor, and said that he did so because the latter kicked him.—The jury took a merciful view of the case, and acquitted the prisoner. I A MOUNTAIN ASH WOUNDING CASE. John Da vies and Daniel Bowen, on bail, were charged with maliciously wounding Evan Davic, at Mountain Ash, on the 9th !\oveinber.Nl r Abel Thomas prosecuted, and Mr B. F. Williams defended.—It appeared that 0:1 the day named the prosecutor left the house of some friends at Penygraig, and proceeded to his home at Moun- tain Ash, having in his pocket a bottle of brandv, the top of which protruded so that it could be seen. When nearing Mountain Ash, and upon taking a short cut to his house, he met the prisoners, who asked for a drink of brandy. Prosecutor declined to give them any of tne spirits, and endeavoured to escape, when one of the men picked up a stone and threw it at the missile striking him on the head, and inflicting a wound which bled pro- fusely. Prosecutor eventually sought refuge in a farm house, and gave information to the police. It appeared that the stone was thrown by Bowen, and that Da vies kicked the prosecutor. The jury found both prisoners guilty, and they were sen- tenced to nine months' imprisonment with hard labour. I- WOUNDING AT SWANSEA—A BOT SHOT. Samuel Norman was indicted tor maliciously wounding and inflicting grievious bodily harm upon John Clement Francis, at Swansea, on the 26th of December. Mr Brynmor Jones prosecuted, and prisoner was undefended.— The prosecutor was a little boy, who appeared in the witness box with his head covered with bandages, and who said that he lived at 16, Little Madoc street, Swansea. Between seven and eight o'clock on the evening of Boxing- day the prosecutor was standing upon a stone looking through a window-pane into the circus, when the prisoner, ready dressed for a performance, appe u-ed with a g-un in his hand, and pointed ii, at the boy. tilel), :I, prosecutor and a witness adeged, put down the gun and took something out of a bag with which he loaded the weapon. ( He again raised the ffun and fired, and at the same time the boy, who received the charge full m his face, fell to the ground insensible. Ttie evidence of persons employed at the circus went to show that the gun was simply loaded with blank cartridge, and prisoner asserted that he took nothing out of the Cap to put in the gun. It appeared that the weapon was given to him with which to play » his part in apiece called "The Soudan War." From the evidence of Mr Jones, the house- surgeon at Swansea Hospital, it seemed that on the boy's admission to that institution his cheeks and nose were stained with gun- powder, and that three days afterwards glass was found under the upper lip. The doctor expressed a fear that tlie boy would lose the use of his right eye.—Prisoner now stated that he did not know that the gun was loaded, and he only meant to frighten the boy.— The jury found prisoner guilty, and sentence was deferred. Later in the day prisoner was sen- tenced to six months' imprisonment with hard laboftr. WOUNDING AT SWANSEA. William Williams (28), labourer, on bail, waa indicted for maliciously cutting and wounding John Rees, at Swansea, on the 25th December. Mr Benson prosecuted, and Mr B. F. Williams defended. It seemed that the prosecutor is the chief inspector of the Swansea Tramway Com- pany, and that it is his duty to collect tickets on the trams at certain times. Prisoner had not a ticket, and was therefore told that he must pay his fare. After some words had passed between prisoner and the inspector the former produced a shilling, and the inspector proceeded to give uim change. As prisoner was receiving the change he struck prosecutor a violent blow on the head with a stone which he had in his hand. Prosecu- tor was knocked down, and prisoner ran away, but prosecutor pursued him, and he was eventually given into custody.—The jury found prisoner guilty, and he was sentenced to nine months' imprisonment with hard labour. Mary Ann Peake, 22, married, was charged with maliciously cutting and wounding William Davies, at Swansea, on the 11th December.— Mr J. Jones prosecuted, and the prisoner was un- defended.—It appeared that the man and woman were in the Engineers' Arms, on the Strand, on the day named, and that the woman threw a glass in his face, inflicting three wounds.—The prisoner alleged tnat she had only acted in self- defence, the prosecutor having taken hold of her and insulted her. She admitted that she had formerly led an improper life, but that sae was now a different woman," and that the prosecutor was quite a stranger to her. Wade giving way to tears she expressed her sorrow for what she had done, and pleaded great provocation.—The jury found pri- soner guilty, and recommended her to mercy. She was ordered to undergo two mouths'imprisonment with hard labour, upon hearing whicu sentence she wept bitterly as she was led to the cells. NO BILL. The grand jury threw out a bill in which Jane Meylin (46), charwoman, was indicted for stealing a purse, containing J34, from Carl Frederick Lewerdowig, at Swansea, on the 27th December. IXDECEXT ASSAULT AT LLANSAMLET. Thomas Jenkins.(lS), on bail, was charged with having indecently assaulted, beaten, wounded, and ill-treated a g-iri, 16 years of age, named Elizabeth Mugford, at Llansainlet, on 15th November. Mr Abel Thomas prosecuted, and Mr B. F. Williams defended. It appeared that the young man and woman were employed at works in the neighbour- hood of Llamsamlet, and that, according to her statement, he endeavoured to take an improper advantage of her on the way heme. The jury tound prisoner guilty, and recommended him to mercy on account of his youth. He was sentenced to six months' hard labour. THEFTS AT MANSTEG. Henry Singer (55) rag collector, pleaded guilty to steading 1 cwt. of coal, of the value of 6d, the property of Archibald Johnston, at Maesteg, on the 24th November and also to stealing a leather belly band, of the value of 2s, the property of the Llynvi and Tondu Company, Limited, Maesteg, on the 23rd November. He was sen- tenced to five months' imprisonment with hard labour. SHOP ROBBERIES AT SWANSEA. Ann Plummer (71), married, was charged with stealing a piece of flannel, the property of Ernesl William Smith and another, at Swansea, 01 the 20th October.—The prosecutor missed som< flannel from his shop door, and detective Morris, of Swansea, discovered a quantity of flannel ai her house in Orchard-street, but as there waf no satisfactory evidence of identity of the material, the chairman directed a verdict of acquittal, which was returned. Ellen Williams (45), married, was charged with stealing a pair of boots from the shop of Mr Wm. Wallace, Swansea, on the 12th December. The boots were found in the possession of the prisoner, and upon the police going to the shop of Mr Wallace it was found that they had been stolen from that establishment. Prisoner now alleged that a woman gave her the boots to pledg-e. She was found guilty, and a previous conviction having been proved against her, tihe was sentenced to four months' imprisonment with hard labour. SECOND COURT. (Before Mr J. C. FOWLEB and Mr H. JONES.) CUTTING AND WOUNDING AT CARDIFF. Padlas Kavadascis, a Greek sailor, was indicted for unlawfully and maliciously cutting, stabbing, and wounding Thomas Stephens at Cardiff, on the 8th November last- Mr Gibbons appeared for the prosecution. On the night of the 8th NovembeJ there was a row among some Spanish and Greek sailors in Custom house-street, the complainant interfered, and it was alleged by the prisoner that he was knocked down and kicked by some of the roughs. He was on the ground with Stephens under him. Prisoner was then seen to draw a knife from his pocket and stab complainant in two places. He immediately got up and ran away, and endeavoured to conceal the knife under a door-step. A boy saw him, and handed the knife to the police. It was thencovered with blood. The prisoner alleged that he had no knife, and that the stabbing was done by two Spaniards. The jury found him guilty, but recommended him to mercy in consequence of the provocation. The court considered that there was not sufficient justification for him to draw a knife. As he had, however, been imprisoned for two months he would only be further impri- soned for two mouths with hard labour.—Antonio Toza, a seaman, was indicted for unlawfully and maliciously stabbing and wounding George Den- nison, on the 11th ov. last. MrG. C. Thompson prosecuted, and Mr Abel Thomas defended the prisoner. On that night there was a disturbance in Sophia-street, and a number of seamen left a boarding-house armed with pokers, sticks, and other weapons. They struck and hit at every one in the street. Prisoner went over to the place where the complainant was stand- ing looking on. Prisoner was armed with a knife, and complainant, on seeing the prisoner rushed at him, struck the prisoner a blow on the mouth. Dennison was then knocked down, the prisoner falling on him. When on the ground the prisoner stabbed the complainant in back. The defence was that Dennison and his companion* were "bullies," and that they were frequently in the habit of quarrelling with foreign seamen. They on that evening were in reality the attacking party. The prisoner was violently assaulted, and thrown down by the prosecutor. He was injured, but some other person standing by stabbed the prosecutor. The wife of a boarding-house keeper also swore that some per- son, not prisoner, entered her house, immediately after the row, and washed his hands. The jury found the prisoner guilty, aud he was sentiritjed to eight months' hard labour. .SHOP ROBBERY AT CARDIFF. Mary Hayes (37), a married woman, was indicted for stealing three coats from the shop of Mr Coluian Follick, pawnbroker and outfitter, Bridge-treet, on the 17th November. The coats were missed from the doorway, and the prisoner was in a few minutes stopped by the prosecutor's assistant with the coats under her apron. She was found guilty. Several previous convictions were proved, and she was sentenced to nine months' hard labour, the lenient sentence being given in consequence of her having an infant in her Sarins. —Robert Graham (23), labourer, and Edward Wilson (18), sailor, were indicted foristealing three pairs of stockings from the shop of Mr Coleman Follick, pawnbroker and outfitter, Bridge-street, on the 13th November, 1883. Mr Gibbons pro secuted. The prisoner Wilson offered the stock- ings in pledge at the shop of Mr Barnett, when he was detained while a police-constable vva» sent for. On the constable leaving the shop Graham came up and said, I gave them to Wilson to pledge. I stole them from Mr Follick's shop but he also said, We made it up "-one tJ steal and the other to pawn them. They were found guilty, and sent to prison, each for one moutb with hard labour. STEALING A WATCH. William Henry Fox, a, sailor, was indicted for stealing a watch and chain from the person of William Creech at Cardiff on the 7th November. He was also indicted for receiving the watch. Mr Jeffries prosecuted. Complainant was in the Rose and Crown on the night in question. ile had then his watch and chain. He left, but ra arriving at Black-weir he missed his watch and chain. How it was taken he did not know, as he was much the worse for drink at the time. Tha prisoner said that a sailor took the watch from the prosecutor and gave it to him to pledge.—He waa tound guilty and sentenced to six months' hard labour, [lest sitting. J

- CABINET COUNCIL.

--THE TICHBORNE CLAIMANT.

ACCIDENTS TO CIRCUS PERFORMERS.

-BURSTING OF A WATER MAIN…

i THERECENTELOPEMENT FROM…

-_-.__.-MOONLIGHTERS AT WORK…

PRINCE ALBERT VICTOR'S < i…

' A LOST CHILD AT NEWPORT.

I The Earthquakesin Spain

SPANISH ANNEXATION IN WEST…

---,.-BANDIT ATTACK ON A TRAIN.

-LOUISE MICHEL AND THE FRENCH…

r-,-""-",,,, ----THE FRENCH…

I THE TRIAL OF MADAME CLOVIS…

---n__-WRECK OF A BAROUE NEAR…

---\ THE FUNERAL, OF THE BISHOP…

1 Ghastly Discovery atI ISwansea.

--___-MR MUNDELLA AT FOLKESTONE

STRIKE OF IRON SHIPBUILDERS…

THE CHARGE OF PIRACY ON THE…

FATAL KICK- BY A HORSE.

BOARD OF TRADE RETURNS.I

--¡ THE POWERS OFTHE BOUNDARY…

I-._! FALL OF A STREET INTO…

---=-=-==..-THE CONTEST IN…

—! DESPERATE POACHING AFFRAYS¡

I TO-DAY'S MARKETS. I

TO-DAY'S SHIPPING. I -

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