Hide Articles List

29 articles on this Page

Advertising

I TOPICS OF THE DAY.

News
Cite
Share

TOPICS OF THE DAY. The Bishop of London has almost literally died in harness. On Sunday evening he addressed a great congregation at St. Paul's, aud yesterday the great bell of the Metropolitan Cathedral was tolling for his death. Dr. Jack- son, who spent some years of his earlier life in London, at first as incumbent of a church at Muswell-hill, and afterwards as rector of St. James's, Piccadilly, was hardly a dis- tinguished ornament of the Church. There are prelates on the Episcopal Bench who were his superiors in learning, in orat- and even in organising ability, but Dr. son's loss will be widely lamented by ni n I of all parties in the Church. Considering that Bishops of London are not usually appointed until they are past the prime of life, and that the ordinary work of the see is very heavy, it is surprising that there have been only six bishops of London during the last hundred years, two of these being translated to Canterbury. Formerly the diocese comprised Hertford and that portion of Essex which now constitutes the diocese of St Alban's. According to tradi- tion the see was formed about the year 179. Whilst our Navy is reported to be gone to the doga, and the national industries are supposed to be following the navy, it must fill every well-conditioned Briton's heart with delight and pride to learn from the papers that the repairing and refitting of the Royal yachts are just complete. The bill is only £ 50,000 sterling. The yacht has been fitted with electric bells throughout, and a newly-devised system of extinguishing y ul fire has been adopted. The new stove in the Royal breakfast room is a most artistic production, and cost from L700 to E300 Bravo! We are not a shabby nation. The political changes caused by death in the House of Lords last year give curious evidence of the growing Conservative ten- dency of the Peers, in spite of the frequent accession of Liberal Peers to the House. Five Whig Peers died during the year, namely, the Earl of Scarborough, Viscount Torrington, and Lords Mostyn, North, and Petre. The successors to the titles are, without exception, Conservatives. Two minors came of age this year—the Duke of Kewcastle and Lord Kenyon—both of whom are Conservatives. Lord Salisbury will then have increased his majority by six votes, counting twelve upon a division. The greater the majority, the stronger the cause against the House of Lords. The London correspondents have started the idea that the eldest son of the Prince of Wales is bemg called Prince Edward instead of Prince Albert Victor in official papers because it is proposed that he should ascend the throne at King Edward VII. There will be time to think over this before the young Prince's services are required by the State. Sir Charles Dilke's constancy to his native parish of Chelsea must be admired, but it is rather a waste of political force to put up the strongest candidate to fight the safest seat. We suppose any advanced Liberal could carry Chelsea, might not Sir Charles with greater I z;1 service to his party attack the Conservative stronghold of Kensington ? Mr Gladstone had a safe seat for Leeds in 1880, but he wrested Midlothian from the Tories. Sir Charles says he feels bound to Chelsea "by the terms of a public statement made in 1873," in which statement he spoke of his refusal to accept tempting proposals which had been made to him to leave those amongst whom he was born and had always lived. But 1873 is a long time ago, and no one knows better than Sir Charles Dilke how time changes circumstances and circum- stances opinions. The residents and commoners of Ching- ford are taking active steps to resist an illegal enclosure of land now proceeding near Chingford Old Church. All their activity will be needed, for the enclosurers, too, are busily at work in the neighbour- hood, "making hay while the sun shines," and fearing that the golden opportunity may soon be lost. A large landowner in East Herts was engaged all last year drawing small patches of land into his estate, and unfortunately there was no organised public opposition to the aggression. No mite of land, however small or scrubby, was too insignificant for this gentleman to steal and if he could narrow a roadway or take in a ditch he did it immediately. Mr Parnell is exerting himself with un- usual energy in the affair of the Tipperary Election. At the second convention he has called to reconsider the decision arrived at last Friday, when his nominee was rejected, he will himself speak, and little doubt is felt in Ireland that on this second occasion Mr O'Connor will be chosen. Mr O'Ryan, the selected candidate of the convention, will, however, press his claims, and there will be an interesting struggle, Mr Parnell making the question one of confidence in his leadership. i-' A return just issued by the War Depart- ment gives some interesting figures with respect to the cost of big guns for the fleet. In 1880-1 four 16 inch muzzle-loading 80- ton guns were supplied by the war authori- ties to the navy. Each gun cost as nearly as possible £ 10,500 each. Last year ten 12 inch 43-ton breechloaders were supplied at an average cost each of 26,240. £478,769 has been spent on navy guns during the last seven years. Three 18-ton 9 inch guns have cost £7,685; three 11-ton 8 inch guns, E5,267 fourteen 80-cwt 6 inch guns, £ 10,022 a hundred and thirty-six 81-cwt 6 inch breechloaders, S,98,671 fifty-eight 36-cwt 5 inch breechloaders £ 28 252 • seventy-six 22-cwt 4 inch guns, £ 27,510 and seventeen 13-cwt 4 inch guns, 25,437. Returns collected by the Mark Lane Ezypress show that there has been a con- siderable diminution in the quantity of land put into wheat this year. In Lincolnshire, Norfolk, Essex, and Cambridgeshire the area is greatly reduced. So, too, in some parts of Suffolk. In Northern Warwickshire and on the borders of Hereford and Wor- cester the area sown is a third less than last year, while in Somerset the reduction is about a fourth. Striking an average, the Mark Lane Express estimates the decrease for England and Wales at between 10 and 15 per cent. Henry Ward Beecher, upon being asked whether there was any truth in the rumour that he was about to be appointed Ambas- sador to England, replied; "Not any; it's ridiculous. I'm not looking for any office under Mr Cleveland, nor do I expect any from him nor is it likely that he will offer me one; nor would I accept any. I sup- ported Mr Cleveland because I thought it best for the country, and I do not want any reward for it. Right here I wish you would say—and you can repeat it as often as you like-that I am not using my influence to obtain office for anyone under the new Administration, and it is useless for persons to apply to me."

[No title]

[No title]

[No title]

ITHE CLUB NUISANCE AT SWANSEA.

--ANOTHER MEETING "OF THE…

----TIPPERARY ELECTION.

THE CHANNEL SQUADRON SCARE.

ITHE DEATH OF THE BISHOP OF…

[No title]

.-----CARDIFF BOARD OF GUARDIANS…

CA R D IFF-PAR LI AM EN TAR…

[No title]

- . - ----'-BIRTHS AND DEATHS…

VOLUNTEER INTELLIGENCE. I

Advertising

THE OPENING OF THE HIGHER.…

-____ NATIONAL EISTEDDFOD…

NEATH TOWN COUNCIL. I

COLLIERY DISPUTE AT MACHEN…

THE LLANTWIT COLLIERY, CAERPHILLY.

--"---THE CWMGLO COLLIERY…

--::=:-==-.::..:.-The Nile…

The French in China. I

GERMAN ANNEXATIONS IN j ZANZIBAR.…

PONDOLAND PROTECTORATE.

- ITHE MONETARY ORISIS IN…

Advertising