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Death of the Bishop of London.

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Death of the Bishop of London. A BRAWLER AT ST. PAUL'S. I The Effect of the Disturbance. [SPECIAL TELEGRAM ] We regret to announce the aeatn 01 tne oisajy of London, which occurred early this morning in the Palace at Fulham. No particulars are yet given. The Right Rev. Dr. Jackson was 73 years of age, and was appointed Bishop of London, in succession to the late Dr. Tait, in 1369. The last appearance in public of the deceased pre. late was on Sunday evening, at St. Paul's Cathe- dral, a painful incident marking- his concluding sermon in that edifice. Just as his lordship was o-oing into'the pulpit, and about to commence preaching, a man who was yesterday sentenced to two months' imprisonment for the offence, attempted to harangue the congregation from the body of the edifice, but was speedily removed by the authorities. The clergy at St Paul's received intimation of the sad event at a comparatively early hour this morn- ing. The "Dead March in ;Saul," was played on the organ at the conclusion of the ordinary morning service, but no allusion was made to the bishop's death, no sermon being preached at this service. It was known at the cathedral that his lordship had been in an en- feebled condition for some time, but no change for the worse was noticed in his condition when he preached on Sunday evening. It was remarked, however, that his voice was somewhat more feeble than usual, though not to any such extent as to create alarm. During the minute or two occupied by the disturbance previously alluded to his lordship remained standing quietly in the pulpit, and after the offender had been ejected went on with his sermon without displaying any agitation. It was noticed that the disquisition on this occasion was somewhat horter than usual. His Lordship appeared for some time to have entertained the belief that he should not live long, and only in November, when I holding a visitation at the Cathedral, he seated that lie felt convinced his end was approaching. He expired in his bed very quietly at half-past three this morning, and as soon as the mournful intelligence reached the City, where it caused a profound impression, Great Paul," the new as j largest of the Cathedral bells, was tolled. Our special correspondent in a later communi- cation says:—" It is believed Bishop Jackson will be interred in Fulham churchyard, adjacent to palace, where the remains of his will already lie as well as several former bishods of the diocese The funeral, in compliance with the wishes of the deceased, will be of a strictly private character. It now appears that the bishop felt unwell yester- day morning, but though his doctor did not appre- hend any grave consequences, death followed in 24 hours. The following is a report of the case of brawling at St Paul's above referred to :— At the Mansion House police-court yesterday, Herbert Percy Freund was brought before the Lord Mayor charged with violent and indecent behaviour during divine service j at St Paul's Cathedral. Mr R. R. Green, the Dean's verger, said that at ten minutes t. eight o'clock on Sunday evening, during Divine service at St., Paul's Cathedral, the pri- soner, who was sitting in the congregation under the dome, got up just as the Bishop of London was entering the pulpit. He commenced speak- ing, but witness could not hear what lie said. There was a great commotion among the congre- gation—people got up in alarm, and stood on the chairs, wondering what was the matter. Witness gave him into custody, and he was removed from the Cathedral. Witnessadded, inanswertotheLord Mayor, that this was the third successive January in which the prisoner had been inside the Cathe- dral, and he seemed to keep it as a sort of anniversary.—Being asked whether he had any questions to put, the prisoner replied that he believed that the witness heard what he said very well, as he spoke very distinctly, and brawling" had nothing to do with the question at all.- An assistant verger gave corroborative svidence, and said he heard the prisoner shout out some words about a house of idols and the destruction of the city. A police- constable who wag on duty in the cathedral said he saw the prisonersuddenly rise from his seat and commence shouting, saying, Now is the time for lie Kingdom of God.'This is a temple of idols." He was given into witnese's custody, and he removed iiim from the cathedral. He ceased speaking directly witness took hold of him, and went quietly with him, but at the police-station he refused his name and address, and declined to give any particulars relating to himself. Being asked by the Lord Mayor what he had to say in defence, the prisoner said What I have to say is this. 1 am God's true church, because He created man and woman in the image of Himself.—The Lord Mayor: Yes, yes but I do not want to hear any nonsense of that sort. Just reply to the charge, which is that you disturbed the congrega- tion of a place of worship b. improper language. What have you to say to that ? I wili not go into any nonsense of that kind.—The prisoner No. You will not hear the Word of God. Neither you nor your predecessors would ever listen to God or His voice. These men who are there are merely worshippers of idols, and they do not know how to save men's souls, nor do they care about men's souls.—The Lord Mayor here rebuked the prisoner, and said that he must answer the charge, and not go into religious matters. Thedefe.idantmade some observation to which the Lord Mayor replied that he (the do- fendant) understood the charge sufficiently well not to go into irrelevant matters.—The prisoner I admit the charge. I said the time had come when God would proclaim His kingdom through- out all the nations of the earth.—The Lord Mayor: Very well, then my duty commences. I find from a list before me that you have been nine times before this court and Guildhall. You have been treated very mercifully on many occa- sions, but mercy seems quite thrown away. (The defendant: No, nothing to do with mercy). I be- lieve, the Lord Mayor continued, you are partially demented,but you have siiffio,;eiltknoivledge to ligc)w that you are doing wrong. I shall not send you to any asylum, but to prison for two months.— The Prisoner Before I go I will tell you that God has sent me to preach in this city. The time has come when it will be delivered from all its troubles. This is the truth I wish to preach, but men resist me, for they i prefer the ways of dark- ness to light, but God will not forget them. That is the truth I preach, but they will not listen to God's Word out of the hardness of their hearts. —The defendant was then removed. It may be added that the sentence does not involve bard labour.

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