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THE REDISTRIBUTION BILL.

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THE REDISTRIBUTION BILL. Meeting at Abergavenny A public meeting of ratepayers was held in ths Town-hall, Abergavenny, on Saturday night, for the purpose of taking steps to counteract the effort which had been made at Monmouth on Wednesday last (at the holding of the Boundary Wednesday last (at the holding of the Boundary Commission), to alter the name of the first electoral division of the county from Aberga- venny to Pontypool. The meeting, which was a very large one, was convened by Mr J. Bishop8 the chairman of the board of Improvement ConI- missioners. The chair was taken by Mr Bishop, who, in opening the proceedings, explained that the Redistribution Act gave Monmouthshire four representatives in Parliament, instead of three as heretofore. The Boundary Commissioners had divided the county into four districts, viz., Kew port, Chepstow, Tredegar, and Abergavenny There could be no doubt that this division of the county had been very carefully considered from all points before it was arranged. (Applause.) Abergavenny was, beyond all doubt, much more central than Pontypool, and was also far before it in the matter of railway and hotel accommodation, agricultural importance, markets and natural ad- vantages. He much regretted that he was not acquainted with the fact that the meeting at Monmouth was to take place, for he should cer- tainly have made a point of being present in the interests of Abergavenny. (Applause.) Mr IVard was there representing the local boards of Pontypool and Abersyclian, but he thought the statements of that gentleman had very little weight with the commissioners. The mayor of Monmouth had appeared with a petition that Monmouth should be joined with Abergavenny instead of wIth Chepstow. (Applause.) The mayor of Newport also was good enough to speak of Abergavenny as being entitled to the division —(applause)—and Mr Baker Gabb made a specch on behalf of Abergavenny. (Applause.) From what appeared in the newspapers, the commis- sioners had had a general meeting, and appeared to have made up their minds and it they were iuclined to consider the voice of the meeting held in Abergavenny that night, they would perhaps be more inclined to consider their report, as regarded the division of Monmouthshire, as nnal, and resist any influence which might be brought to bear upon them from any quarter for the pur- pose of inducing them to open their report, and alter the name from Abergavenny to- Pontypool. Mr R. BAKER GABB, being called upon to ad- dress the meeting, said it had given him great pleasure to do what little he had had the chance of doing at Monmouth. He referred to the great antiquity of the town, and its historical import- ance. Mr CONWAY then addressed the meeting, and after pointing out the numerous advantages of Abergavenny over Pontypool, moved as a resolu- tion :—" That this meeting is of opinion that the petition presented to the Boundary Commissioner at Monmouth by the Pontypool and Abersychan Local Board- to alter the name of the Abergavenny division of the county to that of Pontypool is un- called for, and not warranted by facts. That Abergavenny is the most central town in the di- vision, and possesses numerous advantages over Pontypool, which render it especially adapted to give a title to the division. That this meeting, therefore, respectfully urges the Boundary Com- missioners to decide to retain the name of Aber- gavenny for the division, as proposed in the;r scheme."—;Tbe reading oi the resolution was received with applause. Mr MANLEY Asawe, seconded the proposition, and said they were assembled there that night for tne purpose of defending the name of their town, and to hold on to the privilege which of right belonged to them. (Applau&e.) ilie gentle- men on the commission had mapped out the country no doubt with very great care, and had naturally selected Abergavenny as being the must central and proper place. (Applause.) They had reason to be proud of their town. (Ap- plause.) He did not think there was a town in all England that had done so much for its own improvement. (Hear, hear.) It gave a name to one of the oldest nobilities in the land, very nearly allied to the Orown, and, failing issue, the title would go to the Crown. He did not believe the meeting would have much effect, for he believed the commissioners had quite made up their minds in favour of Abergavenny. (Applause.) Mr C. DANIEL spoke in support of the resolution, which was passed unanimously. The CHAIBMAN said he wished to thank Mr Gabb publicly for the steps he had taken in behalf of the town. The suggestion was loudly applauded, and Mr Gabb responded. Votes of thanks were then accorded to the Mayors of Monmouth and'Newport, and a vote of thanks to the chairman brought the meeting to a close. I

THE WELSH PRESS. || i

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