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TO-DAY'S SHORT STORY.] A Honeymoon…

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TO-DAY'S SHORT STORY.] A Honeymoon Quarrel. [ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.] They were on their honeymoon, and it had no.t been a. sucee-es-in deed. anything but a. pleasant time. Who, or whioh of them, was to blame for this it would be impossible to say; doubtless, the wife blamed the husband, and the husband blamed the wife. The two were seated in the handsomely- furnished drawing-room of a large villa, facing the blue waters of the still ilediter- ranean, with a clear moonlit sky overhead. Do you care to go to the opera to-night?" he asked. It wli pass the time," she replied, indif- ferently; "and you have tickets." "Oh! never mind the tickets, he returned. Perhaps you would prefer to remain ftevo and rest quietly; it is ,ery pleasant." Very pleasant," she repeated, ironically, "to sit here with the choice of staring: either at you or the wall paper. Some people say you are g-ood-boking, out-" Her lip curlsd sarcastically, which he saw, and frowned. Tnere is the sea," he remarked. Yes; it's very interesting. I suppose you will go in any CaEf'?" she asked, smothers j a yawn. Tneu- eyes met. In hers was a mocking light; in his keen penetration, but he aid not fcpeak. Well," she said, don't look ao blue. Silence is. of course, gulden. Why not take a stroil along- the promenade? It's livelier there. Possibly you would not feel so bored." I might not," he answered gravely. Husbands and wives are not expected to amuse each other," she returned. Fortu- nately, that one thÜg- which dees net come under the category of matrimonial duties; it is not mentioned in the marriage service, ae far as I recollect. It's a good thing we are not expected to try, for the result in our case would be failure." He rose with an impatient movement, and as he walked towards the room door said: If you intend going to the opera, it is time for you to dress." Left alone, a curious t?mile played across her features for a monitnt; and settled lines of pain showed in the ironical curve of her lip. The pallid light of the moon fell athwart her face, which, although not faultiees in its beauty, was j-e" siagvilarijr faso:natijig. For a tiiiie .she btcame lest in a revcrie. She was wondering if people who married for love were in any degree haippicr or m,)re miserable than she was. There was a new ginger, a Madam Latima, at the opera that night, a beautiful woman, with a voice of marvellous power, and she mw that her husband was fascinated, for his eyes were fixed on the actress. Hd was no longer bored, and his face had lost that look of indifference that irritated her so. Only once did he address her, and that was to aek: Do you not think Madam Latima has a most wonderful voice?" Oh, beautiful—perfectly delightful," she returned with exaggerated enthusiasm and unnecessary emphasis. Jealousy had clasped its chill finger round her heart, and it was with the utmost diffi- culty she could sit calmly and listen to the eingiug of Madam Latima. They drove acme to the villa in i-ilence, for the aggravating husband made no further remarks about the singer. Next morning at breakfast she asked: "Per- oival. how much longer are we to stay here?" You would possibly like to see the Car- nival, Irene?" "Oh! the Carnival. Net much, but still wo'll Hay-only I am afraid you will find it dull." "Dull! Do yon really think so?" She felt his eyes were searching her face, and there was something in hi", look that sent the blood to her cheeks. Weil, I suppose it is monotonous for both cf u. At any rate, it is deceiving to others.' And she laug'hed aggravatingly. "They think we are a devoted couple." "Then, why net let them continue to think so?" he replied calmly, and with an indif- ference that always raised her anger. "Oh! it doesn't matter, of course, not in the slightest degree. They would not under- stand if we told them that we had been mar- ried by a reluctant, if mutual, consent. An ironical curl of the lip, and she added, "I do not remember if you even proposed Yes, I did, and you accepted me," he returned, with the same calm indifference. Her eyes blazed. I wish now I had been wise and said no," she answered. He did not reply, but buried himself in the "Times." She was young, beautiful, rich, an4 dressed charmingly. He wa-s good-looking, poor, hut heir to a baronetcy. Their people had arranged everything. H-s mother and hers had been specially eager, and the marriage had taken place by mutual consent. A long silence, when she said again, and with sarcasm: Do you know, I really believe there are people who think ours was a love match. úne's friends are so wise. Now, if it had been a love match, there are people who would say that you married me for my-" "Very well, you need say no more. I can finish the sentence for myself." The same day they were seated in the gar- dens, when Irene said suddenly and care- lessly I forgot to say that I had written to dearest inamma asking her to come and stay with me. She has never been in the Riviera." An ominous silence, then he said abruptly: "You might at least have had the common ootirtesy to consult me." "Why should I consult you ? I tell you, Percival, time hanst 60 heavy that I must invite someone." Irene, you might have chosen somebody else." Her mother was no favourite of his. I prefer dearest mamma to all the world. She loves me. I won't be lonely after her arrival. I shall go everywhere with her." ehe concluded enthusiastically. You are complimentary to me," he re- turned. "There is no reason," she said defiantly, "why you should not go your way and I mine? As we are married we have to make the hopt of it." Or the worst of it," he added. Her lip ourled sarcastically. "tYe are living truch an amicable life that there is no reason why we should consult each other. Do you øee?" I see perfectly," he replied. Irene, ao you ever look forward to a time when you ■won't regret our marriage?" 8-he averted her face, but did not speak, and at the same moment her eyes lighted on Madam Latima, who happened to be passing. "Your divinity with the wonderful beauty and the marvellous voice," she said lea rcasti- cally. He glanced at the actress, but did not speak. Madam Latima was not so attractive off the stage as on. That night Irene wrnt out alone to post a letter. Somewhat surprised at this un- usual proceeding, Perciva) .-aid nothing, but as a considerable time elap. ed and she did not return he became alarmed, and went out in search of her. He had made his way to t h-e Post Office ome distance beyond it without obtain- ing any trace of his wife. Suddenly he saw her on the opposite side of the street, talking in a very earnest manner to a man who was wearing a long light ovcrcoat. He stood watching them for some- time, when he saw her part with the stranger, then hasten away along the street toward the villa. When he entered Irene was seated in the drawing-room serene and innocent-looking. He was very pale, and there were hard, set lines about hi3 mouth. Your letter took a considerable time to post," he said, standirlg some little distance apart from her. Her lip curled slightly, and her voice had that tone that always aggravated him as ehe laid: "You cannot mean me to believe that you leyretted my absence or longed for my return ?" "It is my duty to take care of you," he replied, his features calm and set. "Unfortunately, it is. I am =orry ypu are tied so closely to me. Are you?" she asked, her lip curling ironically as before. He did not answer her question, but said: "Alarmed at your long absence, I went out in search of you." A shadow passed across her features, ? nd after a brief silence she replied: Percival, I want you to do something for me. Wil! you promise to do it?" "I promise to do it if I can." he returned. She moved uneasily, glanced at his pale. Bet features, then began: Before I-I met you there was someone etee who was very fond of me. I could not merry him because he was a gambler and all that. He is in want and in trouble. I want to send him money— £ 500. Will you do this for me?" "Your money is your own, to do with as you please," he said sternly. "He has promised to reform, and this money will give him a start. I know he will keep his word to me. for he did love me." Was it you or your money he loved?" came back in reply. The mote is in your own eye. Cast it out ftNt," she retorted. He had been calm until now. but at her words burst into a perfect fury of anger. I wieh to heaven you could loce your money. I would sooner break stones on Q. road for a living than have your gold flung to my face every day I did marry you for yoar money, and don't oare who knows it. Bat, to teU the truth, I 'WI()Q{d change pkLoe6 with. the 30os^rpe«MMi]*r4ir & if j could forget that I had ever seen your face." And do you think," she said, her eyes flashing, "that a woman will ever forgive such an insult. If you have no .2thame, I have self-respect, even though bound to a man who declare he married me for my money." While she was speaking he had averted his face, and when he locked at her again she was sobbing bitterly. "Oh! liene! Irene!" he cried. His arms w,re round her, and she buried her face on his breaet. Quick a.s the sunshine comes after April showers, smiles followed her tears, and the cloude vanisHed. "You will send this money, Percival," she said. Yes, darling." And you will never be croes with your dearest Irene again? Promise me. -Nevtr! Sweetheart, I swear it." A long pause, after which the repentant and forgiven husband asked: When do you expect mamma to arrive?" She raised her eyes to his face as she answered "Do you know, Percival, dear, I forgot to poet the letter."

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