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OLD-AGE PENSIONS ————..——-—-

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OLD-AGE PENSIONS ———— .——-—- DEMAND FOR FORMSI South Wales Applications SCENES AT THE POST OFFICES The machinery of the Old-Age Pensions Act began to work yesterday, for, though no pew- gioug will be pa.id uirtil January 1, tlTe first issue of the application forms was made at the post-offices, and during the next three months a large staff of officials will be engaged in investi.ga,ting the thousands of Claims sent in. We append a tabulated statement showing the number of claims made, as far as we have beon informed, at the different South WaJes post-offiom:- Aberdare and District 265 Pent re 3 Cardiff. 140 Treorky 2 Neath 60 P-rth J Fontypfldd 40 eymmer II Newport. 60 Ytrad 5 Sw.ama 57 Tonypandy I Tenhv.?. 8 'l're&law ""OO" 6 Llandyssul 40 0 Merthvr 21 Mardy. 4 Treherbert 16 TylMatown. 4 Ferndale 10 Of the 60 a/pplicarm at newport, not one -wae a womatfi. In the IAapndywul district of Carmarthenshire poor relief is general ELmong the aged poor, itn-d, therefore, the fact that there were 40 applications was astonishing. At Neath an old aiM of 76 bad been in receipt of 8s. per week from a kindly ex- employer, but this, of couree. did not dis- qualify him. The claims will have to be in all oases investigated by the pension officers, who in due course will made their report to the pension committee. How to Claim I The persons eligible for pensions are:- All British subjects (paupers and ex. prisoners excepted) with a smaller income than JE31 10s. a year, or 12s. Id. a week, who are now 70 years of age, or will ve on or before January 1 next. The scale of pensions is: — Weekly Income Pension. 8s. Id. (or under) 5s. 9-. id. 4s. 108. ld. 3s. 11s. ld. 2s. 128. ld. Is. Approved applicants will receive a "pension >rder" book. with the name and address on the cover. Theee orders will be signed eaoh week by the old man or woman in whose favour they are drawn, and will be cashed over the counter like a poatal order. The exact number of forms issued yester- day cannot be known until the chief pension officer at the General Poet Office receives the official returns, but the figures must run into many thousands. INCIDENTS AT CARDIFF I Extraordinary Career of an Aged Navvy I There was not quite the rush for claim forms at Cardiff that might have been expected, but, on the whole, a respectable number applied at the different poet-officee nearest their homes. Generally speaking, the applicants were intelligent and very respect- able, and were able to give the post-offioe officials details in most oases as to parentage, place of birth, &c. Included in their number were several women. Several of the appli- cants were over 80 years of age, but in most instances the ages were returned as between 70 and 75. One of the earliest oalktrs at the General Post-office for his form remarked, in reply to the query by the official as to his age, "God only knows. I am over 80." One other applicant gave in his age as 64, and when reminded that he was hardly old enoogh for a pension, seeing that the age-limit waa 70. he stated that he would be 70 next month. Another applioant was old enough to remember the time when there was only one postman in Cardiff and three police- men. He had lived in the city all his life One old gentleman was in a peculiar pre- dicament. His parents died when he was very young, and he 'does not know, his father's name, nor the exact place of his birth. He was brought up amongst navvies engaged in public works in various districts, pa,ssed on from one to another, and as timt went on became a navvy himself, and only knows that he is called John Jones, but whether that is his real name he is not quite certain. A special meeting of the Cardiff pensions committee, which will include the whole of tie city council, will be held. in the City-hall on Tuesday next to appoint sub-oommitteee and consider other business. On the rising; of the pensions committee on the same day a special meeting of the city council will be held, when letters will be rea-d from the Car- diff and District Friendly Societies Council, the Independent Order of Oddfellows, and the Supervisor of Inland Revenue relating to old-age pensions. The meeting will also take into consideration the operation of the Act and the regulations of the Looal Govern- ment Board, as well as the report of the town-clerk, and they will also fill any vacancies on the pensions committee. Post-Office Incidents At Kidderminster one pensioner gave iiie age as 93. Several men between 80 and 90 years applied at Smethwick. At Aberdare, where there are 753 residents over 70 years of age, there were 120 appli- cants. At Mountain Ash, where 286 people are eligible, 50 forme were supplied. About 200 applied at Leeds. One applicant stated he had resided in one district of the township for 71 years, and in that long Period he had occupied only two houses. An amusing answer was given to a post- master at Stratford, when he was assisting a'n applicant, and asked the question from the form, "Have you lived in the United Kingdom for twenty years?" "No," boldly answered the applicant. "I have lived aH my life in Stratford." In the Dunmow Union, which embraces 25 rural parishes in Essex, there are over 300 men and women entitled to the pension, and the greater part of these applied yesterday. One old lady fixed her age by stating that She was bom in the ye-gw tbe late Queen was crowned, and another produced '1.n ancient family Bible to support her claim. At King's Lynn one old man called at the Popt-omce as early as seven o'clock, and after An animated conversation with the clerk in charge was obliged to depart with the recom- mendation to call again, as the papers were not ready. Several of the applicants were over 90, and the majority were over 80 years of age. Some were paralysed, and had to be carried into the poet-office. Among the applicants at Ke-rmington-road Post-office was a veteran journalist, aged 81 years, living at Kennington, who boasts of the distinction of being the first man who brought to England the news of the flight of Louis Philippe from Paris, and the hasting of the Republican flag over the Hotel de Ville. Owing to a violent storm the trans- mission of the news waa delayed for several days, and Hr. Martin arrived by the first shin which sailed from Calais to Dover, which he reached on February 29, 1848.

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