Hide Articles List

31 articles on this Page

To-day's Short Story.

News
Cite
Share

To-day's Short Story. A LOVE YARN. I There waa an afternoon tea in progress at the Almonze Clnb. The young women who had managed, with more or leas difficulty, to obtain their diplomas from the various in- stitutions of learning in Brockhurst were all attired in their prettiest gowns, and further adorned with their most agreeable smiles. Eloise French, was serving chocolate at a table all a-bloom with yellow chrysan- themums, and Virginia Lenox was pouring tea at one in the opposite corner, where violets scented the air. The amiable "poetess" who was being "tead," as the club called it, bowed graciously to one and another of the gueetA3 as the stately M.iss Howell, the club's president, presented them to her. Altogether, the afternoon was proceeding very satisfac- torily, when Miss Cross and her brother entered the room. The amiable poetess smiled still more graciously when they were presented to her, and the tall Miss Howell blushed as she performed the ceremony. "You've really been a martyr long enough," said Miss Howell, when the Crosses had moved on. "There seems to be a lull in the arrivals, and you deserve a cup of tea for the way you've borne up under hearing people tell you how much they enjoyed your Last book. Let us come and get some." "I am a little fatigued," confessed Mrs. Lenora. Weston Grey, as her name always appeared. "Can't I sit down with you in some nook for a few minutes and recruit my forces?" "Come into the little den where the club writes its letters and pins up its draperies on reception days. You can be quiet there, and I'll bring you some tea." Miss Howell parted the portieres and ushered the dia-nguisbed guest into the tiny study. Then she made her way to the tea table, smiling and submitting graciously to numberless interruptions. One of these was Philip Cross. He stopped her as she was bearing her cups of tea back to the study. Let me carry those for you," he said. Thank you, no," replied Miss Howell. Mrs. Grey is tired and wants an instant's rest, so I'm going to let her be alone in the cian." He still barred her way, and looked down upon her with such an insistent gaze that she was finally forced to raise her grey eyes to meet it. The colour mounted swiftly to her forehead. Marion," he said, softly, how long are you going to keep me waiting for aai answer?" You have had your answer." I have refused to accept it. You say you won't marry me because you don't believe in the reality of my love for you. It is real. It is lasting. I have never dreamed tbat I could oare for anyone as I do for you. And eo long as your eyes and your face tell me what they do tell me- I must go," interrupted Marion. "Tell me that you will marry me." No. You must wait. How can I in an insta.nt get over the habit of years? Always, ever since I can remember, you have been in love with one girl or another. Your name is a synonym for the love that loves and rides away. You must let me get over that impression." VYom forget," said he, "that I have been away two years, and that one's character forms itself in such a time. Answer me." "When I come back," replied Marion, break- ing away. But as she bore the tepid tea away there were new light and hope in her eyes. The hostess was smiling slightly ae Miss Howell came back. "You've been talking to the fascinating Mr. Cross; I saw through the curtain," she said, ae 6he stirred her tea. "Yes," said Miss Howell, coldly. What leads you to call him fascinating?" "Oh, I heard a great deal of him in Lon- don," answered Mrs. Grey. He was there while I was, though we didn't meet. He is quite a charming fellow, isn't he?" I believe he has that reputation. He has been abroad since I left school." The poetess was a woman. She smiled, hesitated, stirred her tea, and finally let her natural instinct for gossip overcome her acquired principles against it. I fear he's a sadly inconstant person," she sighed. "There are no leBa. than three English damsels sighing out their poor little hearte over him." I am afraid your tea is cold," remarked Miss Howell. "Oh! no. It's just as I like it. He pro- posed to the Honourable Blanche Cuthbert about six months ago, and everything was lovely until she discovered that his undying love for her had just been transferred from the little American, Rosalie Wright. The Honourable Blanche, unfortunately, was enough in love with him to hate half-way affection in return, and ao-well, here he is, apparently untouched." "I am afraid, said Miss Howell, coldly, « that you'll have to come back and hear the praises of your last book again, if YOU':N} rested enough." Oh, yes, my dear! I feel quite refrmhad." Well, Marion? I am waiting." "I don t care to enter into competition with Itoeahe Wright and the Honourable Blanche Outhbert, said Marion coldly. "You'd better go away for another two years, and Let your character continue to form itself." ISO the old cat's been talking, has she?" said Mr. Cross, aheerfully. "Well, Marion, all right. I guess I'm no good at all, and you're quite right to tell me so." And he walked over to the girl at the chocolate table, and was soon hrinsrins bluehes to her face.

Advertising

IAthlete's Fatal Injury I…

HOMELY CHAT ABOUT ACCIDENTS…

For Women FolkI

Passing Pleasantries-I

Advertising

Changes in Welsh TeamI

Advertising

CARDIFF LEAGUE, DIVISION 1…

INEWPORT LEAGUEI

ILAST NIGHT'S MATCHES I

I THE FOREIGN MAIL8 j

Advertising

iDrowning Tragedy I : Drowning…

20 YEARS' -LAPSE OF MEMORY

POLICEMAN'S FALSEHOODS_I

41st WELSH DISTRICTI

PERILS OF WINTERI

ISAILOR'S PASSIVE MUTINY

RATS GIVE FIRE ALARM I

DROWNED IN MUD.

Advertising

 - -UNDERTAKERS' STRIKE'

10,500 MILES FOR A BRIDE I

I GIFT OF SPECTACLES -I

IUNEMPLOYED RECORDER

IHAY SEED AS EVIDENCEI

Advertising

[No title]

Advertising