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FOR WOMEN FOLK.

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FOR WOMEN FOLK. HOMELY HINTS AND DAINTY DISHES. To polish alabaster first rub with pomioe stone and then with a paste made up of whiting, soap. and milk. Rub with: French chalk or putty powder until the required polish is produced. Stained marble can be cleaned if a. paste made of a little unslaked lime and strong soap be thickly applied. It should remain a day, and be washed off and applied again till the stains disappear. "Wainlit and mahogany tables marked by hot dishes or scratched can be restored by a little coid-drawn linseed oil. Pour on wood and rub in well with linen rag, chang- ing rag until oil had soaked into and the table is quite dry. The best way to use up dressmakers' cut- tings is to cut them, into pieces two inches long and one inch wide. Point the ends, then stitch them on a piece of packing oanvafl with the sewing machine. They make excellent rugs for bedrooms. Line the back of rugs to save the stitches from giving way. Hard Water Made Soft. DricBcrfve in a gallon of boiling water Htb.! washing soda and Jib. borax. For washing clothes a quarter of a cup of this to every gallon of water. German Lentil Soup. 9oald Jib. lentils Ln boiling water, drain, put on with quantity of boiling water required. Fry some onions. celery, tomatoes in butter till brown, and add. Simmar two hours. A Little cream may be added if liked. Chocolate Caramels Boil slowly together one pound of brown sugar, one-half cupful of molaaases, one- fourth of a pound of grated chocolate, one- half cupful of cream, ajid one table-spoonful of butter until it is like thick molasses. Take trom the fire, add one teaspoonful of vanilla md pour into buttered pans. Economical Joints for Two People. Get 31b. or 41h. of brisket of beef, tie round ritb. tape to keep in good shape, brown it. aither in the oven or in front of fire, pour boiling water over, enough to cover, and stew slowly (be sure it does not boil fast) for two &nd a half or three hours, according to size. Add onions, carrots, and turnips, a little paisley, a tiny bunch of sweet herbs; also, if hked. a few whole allspice, not too many. If the bones are taken out, and the meat pressed between two dishes, with a, weight OD %>P. it is nicer for eating cold. The liquor oan be made into soup. Get small half-Leg of mutton (fillet end). take out bones, and fill space wiui veal stuff- ing, skewer and tie into shape. Roast in the usual way. basting it well, and chop the bonea up, put in saucepan with a little water, and mixed vegeta.ble. to flavour for gravy. This should be done early, as the longer the bones stew the better. Chapped Hands. It is a fact that some textures of skin ch-ap more easily than others, but no one is wholly exempt, from this bothersome ailment at the present season of the year. The moat important act of preventiou is to dry the hands thoroughly. They cannot j be dried thoroughly unless they are dried slowly, aind this is where the trouble is met. People who take all the time necessary for washing the hands will often hurry through the drying. This means that the pores retain the moisture, and the cold stiff-ens it into the skirt. The hands should be pressed gently with the towel, not carelessly rubbed, and dried evenly over all the surface. Another precaution is to see that the haimis are entirely gloved before going out of doors. A minwte's exposure, if the hands are sensi- tirve, will resu lt in chapptng; yet nian7 people habitually wlLit until they are out of doors before drawing on their gloves. If glov-es are worn ait all they should be worn every day during the wimter. It is very easy cAn a warmer day to catch up a muff and thruut the hands into it, ungloved, but they are bound to be withdrawn, ajid the chapped skin follows th- ir exposure. Extremes of hot and coM water should be avoided in washing the hands. The quality of the soap has something to do with tt. too, and the rinsing should remove every trace of soap from the skin. In the matter of lotions, there are any number for selection. If one has nothing else, vaseline may xlways be used. Glyoeritrue mingled with roeewater to alleviate smarting is am established remedy. Various bottles axe offered ot the chemist's, and are more or less efficacious with different persons. A thin honey-like liquid solution of almond cream is extremely delightful and an -oaf ailing remedy. With aJl lotions it is not the quantity j Applied, but the thorrougharesB with which it Is rubbed into the skin. Old gloves are some- times worn upon the hands at night, butt sufficient massage with the liquid will remove any real necessity for them.

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