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Pound Jap Town to Ashes

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Pound Jap Town to Ashes AND SINK 40-YEAR-0LD STEAMER, Another Naval Battle Proceeding. GERMANY INTRIGUING WITH RUSSIA Far-Reaching Consequences" Feared < RUSS TRANSPORT & 96 LIVES LOST Official information from the seat of war this morning states that- The Russian transport Yenissei was sunk by an explosion of mines at Port Arthur, and her commander and 95 men were lost. 6 Hakodate, in Japan, has been bombarded by the cruisers of the Vladivostok squadron, and reduced to ashes." Four Russian men-of-war bom- barded two Japanese merchantmen off the coast 01 Herunashi; sunk one, whilst the other escaped. Admiral Togo reports that the Japanese loss in the Port Arthur operations was four men killed and 54 wounded. GERMAN INTRIGUES, FAR REACHING RESULTS EXPECTED. j The special correspondent of the "Daily Telegraph" in St. Petersburg tele- graphs I have unimpeachable authority for stating that., if fortune of war prove adverse to Russia, a diversion which may lead to far-reaching results is confidently expected from Germany. Already proposals are affirmed to have been made by the Chief of that State, which, if accepted, will considerably complicate matters. The German Government is especially bitter with England, and will support Russia diplo- matically in any action tending to bring the evacuation of Wei-hai-Wei before The Hague Tribunal. Germany's fixed resolution is to avail herself of the present crisis to win back Russia's friendship, and oust France from favour. But the proposals which have emanated from Berlin are definite and concrete, and, if accepted, are likely to interest Europe more keenly in the Far Eastern war. BLOWN UP BY MINEI TRANSPORT SUNK: 96 LIVESI LOsT. [Central New Special Service.] I PORT ARTHUR, Saturday. Admiral Alexeieff has transmitted the following report to the Czar:- I have to report to your Majesty that on January 29 (Old Style) the transport of mines Yenissei, which was lying on the line of the mined bar, was sunk by an explosion. The Yenissei, having observed that one of the mines was floating on the surface, approached for the purpose of examining it, but was carried on to a neighbouring mine, which ex- ploded under her bows. There was (? no) time to launch boats. Captain Stephanoff (the com- mander), an engineer, two midship- men, and 92 sailors perished. The Russian vessel Yenissie is not mentioned in Brassey's Annual, but it must be assumed from the fact of her being vised afl a. transport that she was a vessel of considerable size. Another Account. I [Press Association Special Sorvice.1, I According to the Novoze Vremya, the torpedootranaport Yenissei was occupied in laying mines at the entrance of TaJienwan Bay, in order to close it a-gainst an attack by sea. It was observed that a mine had risen to the surface, and the ship approached in order to blow it cp. In doing so she ran on another mine, which exploded under her bows. Another Naval Battle. [Reuter's Special Service.] TIENTSIN, Friday (Midnight). Firing can be heard off Chinwang-tao, and it is believed that another engage- ment is proceeding. The Press Association's Tientsin correspondent also corroborates the report. Chin-wang-Tao. mentioned in the dispatch, is about one hundred miios from Port Arthur, as the crow flies, and is on the opposite side 01 the Gulf of Liatong, to the north ot the Gulf of Pcchili. JAPANESE OFFICIAL REPORT [Press Association Special Service.] I TOKIO, rriuay. Admiral Togo's official report of the attack on Port Arthur is dated February 10, at eea, but the whereabouts of the place of dispatch are not disclosed. The report brisfly and modestly recounts the victory. The Admiral e,aye:- After the combined fleet left Sasebo on the 6th everything went off as planned at midnight. At eight the advanced squadron attacked the enemy's advance squadron. the latter being mostly outeide the bay. The Poltava, Askold, and two others were apparently struck by torpedoes. At noon on the 9th the fleet advanced to the offing of Port Arthur Bay, and attacked the enemy for 40 minutes, I believe, doing considerable damage. I believe the enemy were greatly demoralised. They stopped fighting at one o'clock, and appeared to retreat to the harbour. The Japanese Fleet suffered but Tery slight damage, and its fighting strength has not decreased. Our casualties were four ltillctl and fifty- four wounded. The Imperial Princes on board suffered no harm- The conduct of the officers was cool. and *ot unlike their conduct at manceutree. This morning, owing to a. heavy south Wad. detailed resorts from the vessels have not been received, so I merely report the J above facts. I Dignified Speech by the Czar. I [Central News Special Service.] ST. PETERSBURG, Saturday. A solemn service was held in the Church of the Marine Palace on February 11, in the presence of all the Royal Princes and members of the Imperial Council, to pray for the success of the Russian arms over the Japanese. An Imperial Council was afterwards held, at which an address to his Majesty the Czar was drawn up and signed. Next day, February 12, the Secretary of State (Count Solsky), in the company of other Imperial Councillors, waited upon the Czar and presented the address to his Majesty. GENERAL LIKIEVITCH j Is ons of the most distinguished of the officers under I Admiral Alexeil fia Manchuria, and is in command of the Siberian Army Corps. He is an expert in Asiatic warfare, having passed the greater part of his life in the Caucasus and the Eastern dominions of the Czar. General Llntevitch is now in his sixty-sixth year. He fought in 1859 with great gallantry against the Caucasian mountaineers, and won the Cross of the fet. Anne Order for vaJour in the field. During the Rl!oo-Turki8h War in 1877 he commanded the 2nd Cau- casian Rifle Battalion, and again signalled himself by his darinr and military skill. His services in Turkey earned hi. the Cross of st. George, a golden sword of honour, and the rank of colonel. In jSB4 General Linie- vitch was promoted to the command of the 84th Regi- ment of Infantry. In 1889 he took charge of the Trans- Caspian Rifle Brigade, with the rank of lieutenant- general. In 1895 he was transferred to the tlsouri as; commander of the local military district, and in 1900, &t the time of the Boxer outbreak, he was ordered to Mamchurt? M the head of the Sfbenam Army  Corps. Be was in command of the Russian forces which ope- j rated against Peking in that year. ¡ The Czar, in thinking them, said:- I thank you for the expression of your sentiments, and hope with you that God's help will be with us in these so serious times for us. I count now, as always, upon your devotion to myself and the fatherland, and hope that Russia will, as before in her history, arise with honour and dignity from the serious and difficult trial before us, strengthened both at home and abroad, and return to the peaceful pursuits so dear to me and Russia. R ported Land Battle. The Morning Leader" received the following telegram from its correspon- dent ii-, Kobe, Japan, dated Thurdsay: — The news comes that the Japanese troops which were landed at Chemulpho, in advancing on Seoul, have encountered opposition, and that there has been fighting. No confirmation of this is to hand. GENERAL NIKOT AT IVANOVITCH GRODEKOFF, The, Kitchener of the Eussian Army. One of the moet efficient of modern Muscovite Empire-makers. He was born at Kherson in 1(142. His military career, which is a distinguished one, bogon at twenty, when he entered the 3rd Rifle BattJfiion. His rise was rapid. He served during the Caucasian and Khivan Campaigns, and during the arduous wars at Askabad, Samarcand, and Herat. He is known throughout the Czar's dom n'ons as the lieutenant aad intimate friend of the great SkobelofT. From 1883 to 1883 he was governor of the Syr-Darya Province. During the Boxer rising of 1MO be was appointed governor-general of the Amur Pro- vince, of which Admiral Alexo'<-ff is now Viceroy. He fought against the insurgent Chinese in 1900. He is unmarried, a hater of red tape, and extremely quiet in manner. He is intimately acquainted with Persia and Afghanistan, and is considered a foremost authority on Asiatic problems.

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