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FOR WOMEN FOLK. r- - - j

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FOR WOMEN FOLK. r- j Homely Hints & Dainty Dishes. WITH PARS. INTERESTING TO THE MERE MAN. Never comb an infant's hair—brush it. Never nay at any time, especially in the nursery. It is asserted that the longest-lived people are those who make breakfast their chief meal. Women cannot drive nails, but when it comes to driving bargains they can beat the sterner sex. Stains on mahogany may be removed by rubbing them with a cork dipped into a. little oxalic acid and water. When the stains have disappeared, wash the wood thoroughly with pare water, then dry and polish as usual. Steamed Apricot Pudding. Put in a buttered mould a layer of sponge cake, then a layer of stewed apricots, and then another layer of sponge cakes, and so on till the dish is full. Beat up two eggs with one pint and a half of milk, pour slowly over the pudding, steam for one hour and a half, and serve. Pour wine sauce round, and stick the pudding with blanched almonds. Fillet of Mutton, Remove the hump end of a. loin of mutton. and cover it with two sheets of buttered paper. Roast it for two hours, but do not a-llow it to becopie the least brown. Have ready some French beana boiled tender and well drained on a sieve, and* when the mutton has been glazed place them in the gravy to heat and use them in the serving dish as a bed for the meat. Graham Wafers. Beat to a cream half a. cupful of butter; add gradually four tablespoonfuls of sugar; then add one well-beaten egg. Dissolve a level teaspoonful of soda in two tablespoonfula of warm water; add this to half a cupful of sweet milk, add the mUk to the butter mix- ture, and then stir in as much Graham flour as the mixture will hold; work and knead until the whole sticks together. Soli into a very thin sheet, and cut into wafers with a round cutter. Bake in a moderate oven until a golden brown and very crisp. To Use an Old Silk Skirt. To make a pretty and comfortable petticoat. cut the skirt about a quarter of a yard shorter than walking length. Make it the same length all around. Sew this on the machine. Sew on the hem a pleated silk ruffle, cut on the straight of the material, about six inches deep. On the edge of the pleated ruffle sew a narrow bias ruffle about two inches deep. Do not set the ruffles on the skirt proper, aa the skirt is easier to walk in, wears better, and rustlea more if the ruffles are set on the bottom. Small pleats are prettier than large ones. Suitable for Tall Women. Flounced skirts are difficult to make—that is unless great care is taken that the flounces are not too wide and have not too much ful- ness in them. They are best when the flounces are quite scant-three flounces I around the foot, with the flounces much nar- rower in front than at the back, and put on to give a pointed effecti in front, are far more becoming than when the same flounces are put around the skirt plain. A long jacket ought not to be worn with these flounced skirts, and yet some of the newest costumes show this same style of three flounces on the foot of the skirt and a jacket extending well below the hips, and finished around the shoulders with a triple cape. As may be imagined, only a very tall woman has any right to wear such a gown. Breaking a Mirror- "There," said the girl, who was getting ready to go out. "I've broken my handmir- Tor! What does that mean?" "Seven years of sorrow," said her friend. "It also betokens that you will quarrel with your dearest friend." "Charlie? That would be too dreadful. "Charlie? I thought you always counted me your dearest friend? So you have let the cat out of the ba! ThaS pudding-headed Charlie Strong! Refore I'd-" "you needn t say anything more, Sue Gar- land. I hate you! And as for Charlie, you know you would have given your eyes to have caught him!" "Pooh! I refused him half-a-dozen times before he ever looked at you. I wish you good-a.fternoon and a better temper, my dear!" And the friend slammed the door behind her. There were several other girls left, and they one and all began to condole with the girl who had broken her hand-mirror. But she wa-9 inconsolable. "You see how it has acted already, and if there are to be seven years of it I shall just :<Ke, I know I shall! There, I've quarrelled with Sue, the dearest girl in the world, and that's only the beginning," "Let me see where it's broken," said one of I' her chums, as she picked up the cause of the trouble. "There's a fracture right through the length of the glass, but I don't know how it came ■there. I didn't drop it or strike it against knytnmg. Seven years! Isn't it awful?" "Seven grandmothers!" exclaimed the other girl. "That isn't a fracture. It's nothing but a. streak of moist air. Look, I can wipe it off with my handkerchief!" "So it is. Oh, you dear thing! Run after Sue and bring her bobck. Tell her the glass wasn't broken, and we haven't quarrelled, after all! And the seven years are up already; and, oh, I am just thankful!"

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