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1 . THE SCAPA SCUTTLERS. I

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1 THE SCAPA SCUTTLERS. I ARTFUL HUN PLOTS UNMASKED BY THE BRITISH ADMIRALTY. 1 FULL TEXT OF GERMAN i INSTRUCTIONS. Tie British Admiralty has made an im portant discovery during the salvage opera- tion proceeding at Scapa Flow after the notorious scuttling incident which occurred in June. The discovery unmasks the hypocrisy of the German Government's denial of responsibility for the scuttling incident by the discovery of a "mast secret" letter written to Admiral von Reuter by ;ear-Admiral Trotha, Chief of the German admiralty. Trotha wrote, "Surrender id out <>f the question." Tie letter, which is now in the possession pf the British Admiralty, was found in the jgafe cf Von Reuter's former ship, the mden, one of the scuttled cruisers that has been salved. The decision to publish Trotha's letter i? l sequel to the maintenance of the German ttitude which is now being made an excuse for the non-signing of the protocol to the Peace Treaty providing reparation for the scuttled fleet. It is also stated by the German Govern- ment in contending their innocence that "Orders from the German Government failed entirely to reach Admiral von Reuter during the time when his ship6 were at Scapa Flow." The Admiralty point out that the discovered letter disproves that state- ment. Opportunities for communications included the visit to Scapa on May 4 of the Dollart, a German ship, and by two German transports, Bardenia and Schleswig, which arrived at Scapa Flow from Germany on June 17, bringing provisions and for repa- triating surplus crews. HINTS TO VON REUTER. I Addressed to the Commander-in-Chief of the interned ships, Rear-Admiral von Reuter, Scapa Flow, the letter, found on the Emden, was dated May 9, and is as followo: "MOST SECRET. I "Sir,-You have repeatedly expressed to Commander Stapenhorst, the wish of the in- terned ships kluternierungs "Ver'oand) to be informed 3.8 to their fate and the probable termination of their internment. "From Press news and utterances in the British House of Lordet it appears that our opponents are considering the idea of de- priving us of the interned ships on the con- clusion of peace; they waver between the destruction or the distribution among them- selves of these ships. The British naturally raise eome doubts about the latter course. "These hostile intentions are in opposition to the hitherto unquestioned German right of ownership of the vessels, with the intern- ment of which we complied on the conclu- sion of the Armistice only because we were obliged to consent for the duration of the Armistice, to an appreciable weakening of the striking power of the German iicet. "Sir, you may rest assured that it will be no more than the plain duty oi our naval delegates at Versailles to safeguard the fate of our interned ships in every way and to arrive at a solution which is in accordance with our traditions and our unequivocal German rights." NO SURRENDER. I "In this connection the first condition will be that the ships remain German and that their fate, whatever turn it may take under the pressure of the political situation, will not be decided without our co-operation and will be consummated by ourselves, and that their surrender to the enemy remains out of the question. We must hope that these just demands may retain their position in the scheme of our political standpoint in the question of peace as a whole. "I beg you, Sir, ao far as possible, to ex- press to the officers and crews of the in- terned ships my satisfaction tbat, for their part, they are so eagerly nursing our Ult matural hope, that the interned ships will •be retained under the German flag, and to communicate to them our strong desire to make our just cause triumphant. This spirit is calculated to support the German dele- gates in their efforts at the Peace Con- ference. FATE OF THE NAVY. ( "The fate of the whole navy will depend upon the results of these efforts: it is to be hoped they will put an end to the intern- ment, which, through our enemies' breach of faith, has become so cruel, the sufferings and trials of which are deplored by our whole llavy, and which will ever be remem- bered to the credit of the interned crews." ORDERS FOR THE SCUTTLING. The detailed, orders given by Admiral von I Reuter to the commanders of the German I I ships are dated June 17, 1919, and are addressed to the Chief of the interned squadron. (Only to be sent by an Officer.) Persona!. To the Commanding Officer. 1. The Commanding Officers are ordered to make the necessary preparations for sink- ing their ship so as to ensure that on receipt of the order she will sink as rapidly as possible. 2. Complete preparations are to be made after the crews have been taken off. It is left to the discretion of the Commanding Officers to decide to what extent selected members of the crew may be allowed to assist and to have knowledge of our inten- tions without endangering these intentions in any respect-ó18 for instance by betrayal to the English. 3. The following preparatory measures arc to be taken:—The keeping open of all in- ternal doors and hatches permanently, such as alley doors, bunker doors, doors of longi- tudinal and athwart-ship bulkheads, hatch- ways, ventilators, scuttles, etc., and at the discretion of the individual Commanding Officers, the following additional steps may be taken, the necessary measures to allow of rapid opening of torpedo tubes, the opening up of a condenser, the opening of valves and sluices, except the last one, in flooding, etc., mains. 4. Boats. If possible not more than one boat-for the reception of the crew-to be got ready for lowering. A fiier of truce is ?, if truce is to be kept in readiness to be taken into the boat. The boats with the disembarked crews are to proceed to the shore by the shortest route; they will remain assembled under the orders of their officers. 5. Sliiking is only to take place:— (a) in the case of forcible intervention on the part of the English; (b) On the receipt of special orders from me. 6. With reference to 5a above :-Officen; must consider carefully what steps they should take to ensure the sinking of their vessels in case the Euglish should endeavour to take the ships by surprise. A surrender demanded by the English, but not sanc- tioned by me, is to be looked upon as a forcible seizure, and is therefore to be replied to by sinking the ships. 7. With reference to 5b above, orders may be given either (a) to sink the ship at once; (b) to sink the ship at a given hour. 8. Signals.—For immediate sinking in ac- cordance with 7a, the following signal will be made:— "To all Commanding Officers and the Leader of the Torpedo Boats. Paragraph Eleven of to-day's date.—Chief of the In. terned Squadron." this signal is to be passed on by every available method. The sinking of the ship is to be commenced immediately. For sinking the ships at a given hour, in accordance with 7b, the following signal will be made:— "To all Commanding Officers and the Leader of Torpedo Boats. Paragraph Nought nine one three. -,tckuorwled,,e.' H Chief of the Interned Squadron. In this visual signal the first two numbers indicate the date (i.e., the 9tn), and the two last numbers the hour at which the sinking shall begin. The time shall be received from midday to midday (astronomical). 9. Acknowledgment. The receipt of the visual signal is to be acknowledged as fol- lows :— "To Chief of the Interned Squadron. The Paragraph of the Visual Signal re- ceived.-Commanding Officer, Emden." 10. As the acceptance or non-acceptance of the peace terms and the re-opening of hos- tilities is about to be decided, the next few days will be particularly critical. From Wednesday, the 18th (eighteenth) June on- wards increased vigilance bv day and night will be necessary, to observe not only any unusual behaviour on the part of the- Eng- lish, but also signals from Emden. As the personnel cannot be relied upon ent. rely, the officers themselves must undertake the necessary look-out duties. 11. It is my intention to sink the ships only if the enemy should attempt to obtain possession of them without the assent of our Government. Should our Government agree in the Peace terms to the surrender of the ships, the ships will be handed over, to the lasting disgrace of those who have placed us in this position. 12. Commanding Officers should keep this document under lock and key; it must not fall into the hands of the enemy.

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