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rCUB LOf)ON LETTER.

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MOTHER AND HOME.I I(OTHER…

FIVE IS THE LIMIT, j

IIN LIGHTER VEIN !

POSTMEN OF THE EAST. I

I OTHER MEN'S MINDS.I

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OTHER MEN'S MINDS. I Although the burden cast upon thie country is not tight, it is not so heavy a< that home by France.—LoRD HuGH CECIL. 1- PARSONS AND POLITICS. I It is TM part of the duty of ministers oi I tJie Gospe! to concern themselves with politi- ca.l questiona.—CANON WOODS. THE FALLING BIRTH-RATE. I Tto question of the fa.UIng' birth-rate wiU have to be tackled by tJbe Church and State in a vigorous manner.-DFAN o? LINCOLN. TWO POINTS OF VIEW. I The League of Nations is one of these org'aniaatioBa which I consider is not to bo trusted at the present time.—CANON BAn- NABO. The Church, ought cordially and enthu- siastically to welcome and sedulously to sup- port the idea of a League of NatioDa.— Bisnar op OxyoRN. THE FIRST LAW. I JLfter the war our first consideration must be work and vagea for our <rwn peiOple and to get control of raw materiala for ourae!vea and our Allies If Uio enemy euBered in thia respect it was only a just expiation of the greatest sin that history had known.— MR. G. H, RoBKBTS. BEAUTY OF COMMON SENSE. I The most sublime and beautiful thing the worLd has ever seen is the common sense ot the common men and women of the civilised nations of t<o-day.—MB. iBviNa BACHEH.EB* BACKBONE OF THE ARMY. I N.C.O-a are atiU the backbone of the British infantry and cavalry regimenta.— LtOBD DERBY. AMATEUR STRATEGY. } No war waa er waged in which groater weight had been conslatently allotted to the opinionB and advice of the soldiers. When the records come to be written, it will be found how surprisingly small a part ama- teur strategy haa played in the regulation of the operations of the war.—EABL CuEzoN, EARLY CLOSING. I It is my ambition not to retire from Hie Early Closing Assoc iation until it has assisted to place oti the Statute Book a com- pulsory Seven O'clock—and pcrlia,pa a Six O'clcc-k--Qosing Bill.—CATTAIN ALBERT LABKING. SMALL PROFITEERS. I The big pronteer, like the middle-man and a certain type of dealer or merchant who merely buys to sell again, Lave b.pen thrust aside, but there has sprung up scores of other smaller profiteers who manoeuvre in every way to get an extra copper or shilling out of the consuming public for any article, the price of which cannot yet be iixed.—ME. J. R. CLYNES, M.P. IN THE DAYS OF OUR RICHES. I l Before the war we were rich with an j t almost nauseating ostentation.—BisHor OF I t PETERBOROUGH. I STATE CONTROL OF INDUSTRIES. I The Labour Party's programme necessi- tates that the nation should take no step back from the policy of controlling the gTcat indus.triea and services it has taken in hand during the war.—MR. HENDEBSOM. I FARMERS IN THE MAKING. I I regard the holder cf the smallest allot- ment in the grimiest city as & farmer in the nuking.—Ma. LESLIE ScoTT, E.G., M.P. I TAKING NO RISKS. I Thcr.3 Is more food in the country than b€* fore the war because there needs to be. In peace we could live from hand to mouth; we cannot aoord to take risks now.—SiR &VLTli-CR YAPP. I MINERS AND PEACE. I I am nfr&id tlierc. is a rude awakening n store for those who believe that only a very small minority of miners are in favour of immediate peace negotiations.—MR. EoBEBT SM1LLIE. I NO GOOD FOR SALLY. I There are too many peopJe like the woman who wrote to her chil y,cople ll l ,,e the woni?in who wrote to her child's teacher saying, "1 dMi't want my girl Sally to be taught any- thing about her inside. It does her no good, nnd it is very rude.—PROFESSOR E. 11. GRIFFITHS. I THE TWO GOSPELS. ) Our working people have been startled again and again by hearing from the lips of clergy men, and sometimes clergymen in no humble sphere, <-tcntiments which have seemed more to echo the Imperialism of the Stock Exchange than the principlea of the gospel.—BiSHOr OF .HEREFORD. I A WARNING. I The war mnst not resolve itself into a stomach question or a nerve problem.— FATHER B. VAUGHAN. A BARRIER TO PROGRESS. I The nrst essential for the future is to break down the barrier which existed before the war between employers and employed. Cnless a good, working, progressive under- standing can be achieved between employers a-nd employed, no real progress Is possible; with such an understanding fie possibilities arc well-nigh Hmitless.—DR. ADDISON. THE VOLUNTEERS. I Whoever sneers at the Volunteers and ex- presses doubt as to their state of eSicieucy is either a knave or a foo!.—COLONEL NUGENT. THE LAND AND THE PEOPLE. I The Labour movement of tho futile wilt not accept a claim that the sword is the only title for private ownership in land, and organised La.bour must make it their busi- ness to restore the land to the people. Reconstruction in the future must he on those lines.—MR. ROBERT SMtLME. BEER RATIONS COMING. I It is clear that b<-fore long t-;ome scheme of rationing beer will have to be adopted.—CniEB CONSTABLE OF MiDDLESBROCGH. THE ECONOMIC WEAPON. I The people of Germany should be given to understand that for every month Germany continues the war by asking for preposteroua terms of peace they will be denied facilities to our raw materials and to our ports for a complete year after the war.—ADMIRAL. Sin B. MEUX.

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BRITISH DAYLIGHT RAID ON TREVES…

t POSED AS AN EARL :!

BURGLARIES DURING RAIDS. I

SOHO GAMBLING RAID. !

A DISGRACEFUL SUGGESTION.…

MINISTRY OF INFORMATION..I

IBOMBS ON HUN AERODROME. I

IA SOLDIER'S THEFT. I

MAILS LOST.I

IJUDGE DIES IN COURT. J

POILUS.

IMPROVED COOLING FAM. I

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