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notJT MEN AND WOMEN.

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notJT MEN AND WOMEN. The Quoctls earliest four-footed friend,says Homt Chat, was a donkey, a beautiful auiaial, given to her by the Duke of York, the brother of George. IV. On hilS first visit to her the baby Princess quite won his heart, for when he entered the room the child, probably seeing in his face the likeness to her dead father held out her arms to him with a sunny smile. The donkey "Vas one of his earliest presents to her; on it sb.4 lcs»r»t to ride. aud frequently appeared with It in Sensiugton-gardenp. Tunbridge Wells -,tad The gaily capariaonad animal became quite historical, as it always accompanied it, Røya). srjsttess. A pretty story in connection with this animal is told. Soon after her fourth birthday her ancle, 3eorge IV., sent an invitation to iictlu Victoria to visit him at Carlton House, and she exclaimed gleefully "0 munma. shall I go on my donkey ? rith child-like simplicity, never doubting but that as Majesty would be best pleaaed co see ncr when iacompanied by her most treasured possession. It is stated that Sir WilliaiA1 Flower, the director sS tfie Natural History Museum at South Kensington, am beer offered, and has accepted, an extension of !lis term of office for three years from the expiration )f his retirement date, under the a-clausc iegu- 'ation. Sir William will thus be able to continue :he excellent work of reorganisation of the exhibition jalleries which he commenced eighteen months since. Though the work is. of course, still far from finished, sufficient has bean done to demonstrate the yeat need there was fro- a reform in the method of sxhi biting specimens aud iu muse ax- curatorial work generally. Mr. Sidney Cooper, R. A., is a good example of paticiice-a quality essential to anin' t painters— and a characteristic story is told of W i efforts, at she beginning of his career, to put a cc » canvas. Saving -elected a restless cov oufc -.A & herd, he watche" every movement and folio'j» :i her for several lays before he ,v&F able to Snish his iketehes, when he computed that ho bad walked fully 100 inilas during 'bp "rucess. General Sir Gerald Graham very sariy iomen- atrdMd his low for the career o. a soldier. When, as a youngster, he was in the home of hit. father, at that time a pracHsiug M.D. at Eden Brows, Cumberland, young Graham used to indulge his assaulting proclivities by charging doors and windows with the garden rake a:; a battering-ram. It is on record that, on one occasion, he stripped the numerous shelves of his father's dispensary, and piling the jars and bottles citadel fashion,proceeded to discover in how many blows with the afore- mentioned weapon he could Jernolish the lot. "What followed on his father's arrival is not recorded, but it is quite easy to imagine that in the next enonnnj^r in which the boy took part his experiences were those of the attacked party. Amid surroundings, says Charles Miner Thompson in his article on Mark Twain in the April Atlantic, which were curiously American, if not specially apt to nourish literary gemus, Mark Twain, "a good-hearted boy," says his mother, but one who, Although "a great boy for history," could never be persuaded to go to school, spent a boyhood which, it appears, was "a series of mischievous adven- tures." When he was twelve years old his father died, and the circumecau sen of his mother were such that he had to go to v-ofk as printer's appren- tice in the office of the Rmnnibal Weekly Courier. "I can see," he sp.id once at. a printers" banquet in Rev York, "that printing orlice of prehistoric times yet, with its horse bills o" she walls; its I d boxes clogged with tallow, became we always stood the caudle in the k box nights; its towel, which «v«s never considered scaled until it could stand < For three years h* worked in this delectable esrantlshment, and then. at the age of Fifteen, -an away from home, apparently without a peuai) ot money. Until he was twenty or thereabouts Mark Twain seemed to have wandered through tht eastern half of the country as a tramp printer. Then, suddenly changing his vocatiati, lAe became a pilot on the Mississippi River. Five years later, the railways and the Civil War having made piloting an impos- sible occupation, he cnfisted as a three-months volunteer in the Confederate army, and was cap- tured. but succeeded in escaping from the tobacco warehouse in St. Louis where he was held prisoner. He fled to the West, the West of Bret Harte, swarm- ing with adventurers, with whom the fashionable ornaments of the day were "an eight-inch revolver, an Arkansas toothpick, and jack boots/1 At miner, journalist, and lecturer he led a rough and im- pecunious life in Nevada and California, until in 1867 he published his first book, "The Jumping F;c,,Ig of Calaveras," and sailed by way of Panama to New York. A little later, he found the oppor- tunity to go to Europe and the Holy Land as a news. paper correspondent, and so obtained the materials for his "Innocents Abroad." After many difficulties and with much misgiving, the book was finally Published. The next morning, J\f..rk Twain, then fchirfcy-four years old, avtuke, like Bylou, to find biniielf fAilAOLW. In Mr. Hardy's new novel, "The Well Beloved," t)h're is an interesting glimpse of 'A Past Prime Minister in one of the London scenes. Interested readers are aaking if it is Lord Rosebery who is meant: "A past Prime Minister was standing' in the fciddle of the largest room, discoursing in the genial, .1mast jovial, manner natural to him at these timp-s. The two or three ladies fonning his audience had 8en Joined bv another in Mack and white, and it "as on her that Pierston's attention was directed, M well %s the great statesman's, whose Rrst sheer giizo at her, expressing Who are you ?' almost Vjrli iily, changed into an interested, listening look fts the few words she spoke ware uttered—for the Minister differed from many of his standing in being 8tremety careful not to interrupt a timid speaker, giving way in an instant if anybody else began with him. Nobody knew better than himself that all way Iftarn, and his manner was that of an uncon- teited man who could catch an idea readily, even if ht could not undertake to create one." By the deatft of Na wab Sardar Mahomed Afzal Klian the Indian Government has lost one of its oldest tnd most trusted "soldier-politicals." He was con- Oflctoo by blood and marriage with the Royal house of Ifghanistav, and took refuge in India. on the fall of A. mr Shall Shuja. He joined Probyn's Horse, now known ai the 11th iieagal Lancers. He formed one 3f Sir i'OtigliVS Forsyth's mission to Yarkand ift: 18 '3 and when he was sent to this country some rear,s later Iv was selected :It( orderly officer to the P ince of W lea. He accompanied Sir Lepel Grittin p ;!kce of W l e lie 10 Cabul during the Afghan war, and was assigned foe di," cilt tMk uf opening communications with Abdui Rahman at Badakshan. a task .whicb u. Juin.hd with conspicuous succoss. "'h" new Lord Plunltet has had con«?d»rable Uplimatir. experience, "but nothing to that of tiis Wi; who has ^>eaoheci the Atmosphere of diplomacy from her birth. As a child Lady Hermione played in Canada, then s lie passed from one cold land to another and had experience of Russian winters, winiH, oesides knowieog:: iu riper years of Con Stantinopit Rome, and Paris, she can ten of Indian lifp and problems.tror as is natural in a daughter 91 u ,r ma n&dy Dudefin, Lady flormiore is a lady 01 considerable talents and great obbervattau, while the it Au iaiuntaOle hostess. l At Is to he hoped that it may not be noep."nry to jeftd Sir John Willoughby to the Clock Tower. Mr. Bradiaugh, it may be remembe -ed. had a short experience of detention there. Sir John is a deputy- lieutenant and a justice of the peace. He is a naa of 36, and a bachelor. After a period at Eton he went to Cambridge, of which University he is an jfcl, A. For some time h6 ht'ld a commission in tie 6th Dragoon Guards, en-enng afterwards the Ttval Horse Guards. Before g,iing to South Africa he served in Egypt in 18S2, and was in the Soudan eitpeditiou of 1885. Sir John is a director of W jllougldiy's nd (V-pany. Wrt his rat et !i' doiuaiw in LiUS couuUji 02LLoutt to soiuo ..etc.

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