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Betting and Gam:> ing Bl.,..tt?,ng…

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Betting and Gam:> ing Bl. t t?,ng and Gam4"1 )i lpg REV, GWYNNE OWEN'S INDICTMENT. I "No one who knows me," said the Rev. Gwynne Owen at Greenfield Church on Sunday night, "will accuse me of be- ing narrow-minded or that I am likely to denounce anything on the grounds of mere prej udice. If therefore 1 raise my voice this evening against betting and gambling you may bo sure that I feel there is urgent necessity for doing .so." These were the opening remarks in a sermon against Betting and Gambling iJcli made a deep impression on a crowded congregation. The rev. gentle- man said that the craze for betting had spread like an epidemic during the last few years. "Sly first objection," he continued "is on the broad grounds that betting uid gambling inflicts serious injury on all forms of spcrt and recreation where the evil creeps in. Cricket, football. billiards, all become infected with cor- ruption and lose all their genuine in- terest as soon as betting begins, because you can never be sure whether the best side or the best man wins. The same applies to horse-racing. There is no harm in racing itself; all this is due to the betting influence. It is a pity that wholesome recrcation and honest sport must be sacrificed be- cause a gang of bloodsuckers are cut for gain, and a bigger crowd of victims allow themselves to be duped. In the second place, I protest against i". in the interest of the victims, and here again I take my stand first of all oil the lowest ground-—money. It is very easy to send Is. or £ 1 or £ 100 to a bookmaker and receive perhaps a hund- red times the amount back again almost by return of post. Very simple. Yes, and so are you if you do it. Where do you think this money comes from ? From the bookmaker ? Not likely. He From t"r?e boo l-,? iia k er takes jolly good care not to be a loser. It comes from the pockets of a hundred other betters,—or mere-who have lost, and next time you may be amongst them. Betting and gambling lead to crime more than anything else, except drink- ing. I have heard that after the Epsom and other races, there were always a number of young postmen a waiting trial for having stolen contents of envelopes to pay their betting debts. Not all who fall victims are sent to prison. Some "void shame by committing suicide. At one time gambling was more or less con fined to the wealthy classes, but that is not the case to-day, as it has spread all over the land like a plague—from the petty "pitch-and-toss" to the game of "bridge" in mansions, etc. I do not say that the gambling fever is more acute to-day than 150 years ago, but cer- tainly it is more widespread. Can anything be done to put a check to the craze ? Most decidedly. (1) Keep yourself clear of it; (2) Help to form public opinion. This has achieved great results in dealing with drunkenness. Why cannot the same thing be done in regard to betting and gambling. I have appealed to you this evening on several grounds of common-sense, and, tc put it plainly, I say, don't be such v o- fools as to bet, as you are a sure loser in the long run. My second appeal is on the grounds of conscience. If you won and kept on winning you would be rob- bing somebody else. And my third ap- peal is on the grounds of your higher duty to God, and your fellow-men, to check an evil which is so fruitful in producing crme."

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Municipal Notes. —.—-—

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