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.Tinplates beat Steel. —.—

SHOP ASSISTANT'S HOLIDAY.I

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A Defiant Husband I

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HICH WATER AT LLANELLY.

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Glynea Explosion. »—

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Glynea Explosion. » — DISCOVERY OF A PIPE. The inquiry into the Glynea Colliery explosion on June 8th- as a result of which one man was killed, was held yes- terday by the Llanelly Coroner (Mr. W. W. Brodie). The deceased was a pump- man named David Evans, Hendre road, Llwynhendy. The manager of the colliery, Mr. Thos. Williams, stated that at the time of the explosion he was in the fan engnie-house. The pumping noise wAs to him a suffi- cient indicator of what had happened, and on going outside he saw that the roofing above the pit had fallen down the shaft. Along with other workmen, witness descended the downcast and steps were taken to divert the whole of the air. While they were working away the news came that knockings had been heard in the upcast. Accompanied by the overman and two pitmen witness went to the bottom of the shaft where they found W Clement (fireman) and Rhys Evans, and at the Bushy parting they came across the deceased who was injured. On the following day the bowl of a smoking pipe was found in the pit and deceased s lamp, the glass of which had been broken, was recovered from underneath the cage. He could not say whose pipe it was. The explosion occurred near the cage, there being an accummulatin of gas owing to the fan being stopped for repairs. The Coroner: How do you account for the deceased being where he was at the time of the explosion P Witness: It was merely a case of want- ing to get home early. The Coroner: Was the possible cause of tho ignition of the accumulated gas at the bottom of the pit an electric spark?— No. The power had all been cut off a quarter of an hour previous to the ex- plosion. Could you put forward any theory for the explosion ?—My opinion is that the lamp did not cause it. Eliminating the possibility of the ignition being duo to the lamp or electric spark, what do you say was the cause ? Do you think fit to tell the Court what your opinion is ?-I prefer the jury to arrive at their own conclusions. I Coroner: I can only offer you the op- portunity of giving your opinion if you so desire. It is not for me to press you, being as you are the manager of thft colliery. You said that in your opinion neither the lamp nor an electric spark caused the explosion ?-That is so. Cross-examined by Inspector Dyer Lewis- On the point of finding the bowl of the pipe-what method have you of searching men in accordance with Section 3.5 of the regulations ? Witness: A general search is being made but not very often and personally, 1 am directly against the system. The Inspector: But have you any sys- tem ?—Regular underground workmen are irregularly searched, but any others descending the pit are always searched. This explosion would never have oc- curred unless there was an exposed light? —That is so. There was no electric current and there could be no friction because there were no trams running ?-That is so. A light must have been exposed Exactly. Do you know whether the deceased was a smoker ?—Yes, but I am not prepared to tell you here that the man did smoke. Do you think that smoking was the cause of this ?-No. If he struck a light to light his pipe ? -That would have caused it. In reply to Alr. Williams, miners' agent, witness said that every possible precaution was taken in the interests of the men in the pit when the fan was not being worked. He had previously warned the men of a probable acc-ummu- lation of gas. As far as the pipe was concerned it might, as suggested, have fallen from the top :I it was IOHMCI six feet irum the t)i L,it, S ha L Replying to Mr. 'F. N. Powell, the manager said he did not think the ex- plosion was caused through the deceased smoking. Be thought tins was possible; there was no need ior a man to strike a match in the dark to send or receive sig- nals, but once having given a signal "right the if II I S a possibility of a man wanting a light to jump inLo the carriage. Miners' Agent.: Was the deceased s"arched for matches ? Witness: 1 could never search an in- jured iran. Miners' Agent: Not to get at the cause of the explosion in fairness to him? —I woild not h:n e the heart to do it. Miners' Agent: It is better to search an injured man for matches when he can answer for himself than to make such a statement as you already made after his death. Wm. Clement, fireman, spoke to having found the deceased after the ex- plosion lying face downwards about 15 yards from the bottom of the shaft. Witness could see that he had been burnt and when asked how the explosion had happened the deceased replied: "I know nothing; the only thing I saw was a flash." Evidence was given by Thomas Bassett, tinder manager, as to the finding of the pipe six feet from the bottom 0 of the shaft. Cross-examined by Mr. Wiiliqins: Could it not be dropped from the top or from your own pocket while \ou were searching ? Witriss: I ni-N (-r- take a pipe down. A remark \s made 11\ Mr. Powell, whereupon Mr. Williams said "I will have none of >our iriMniisitiiins. Mr. Powell: Well, don't try and fasten the pipe on to the witness. Mr. Williams: We ha\e heard of such things before. Witness said he was looking for de- ceased's lamp when he found the pipe. Mr. Williams: Did you tell anyone that the lamp had been found ?-I did not advertise the fact. Everyone knew. 1" knew in Swansea that the lamp had been found, but I never heard about the pipe. Witness;-It is common knowledge. Mr. Williams: Is it not common know- ledge that there is gas in this colliery ?- No. Mr. Williams I say it is. Mr. Powell: "Y ou have no right to make such a statement. You must take the answer. You seem to have a sort of vindictive spleen against this colliery. Relatives have not taken you into their confidence or they would have told you about the pipe. The jury found that the the deceased met his death accidentally through an explosion.

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