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.,?. I NOTES OF THE DAY.

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?. I NOTES OF THE DAY. 930- I from our London Correspondent. I I the Hopes cf Peace. I Once more the hopes of peace arc vanishing. It seemed likely a few weeks ago that the Pope's noble Peace Note would have brought the belligerents closer together; and its plea for the es- tablishment of a new international order, J in which -vioral force would take the f place of material force, voiced an univer- sal aspiration. Alas the trend of events in the past fortnight has been not to- i, wards but away from peace. There is now evwy indication that the war will continue well into next year. Germany is in an unenviable position and would welcome a peace based on the restoration of Belgium and the evacuation of French territory in possession of the German armies. But she will not yield one iota in the matter cf Alsace-Lorraine. Baron Ivuhlmann was emphatic on that point in the Reichstag this week. "Never" said the German Minister for Foreign Affairs, "will Germany in any form make any concessions with regard to Alsace- Lorraine." Except for the French de- f ma-nd on this subject, he thinks "there is no absolute impediment to peace." To Stand by France. Kuhlmann has had his answer from Lloyd George. Speaking on Thursday, the British Prime Minister said that how- ever long the war may hist "this country intends to stand by her gallant Ally, Prance, until s he redeems her oppressed children from the degradation of a foreign yoke." Mr. Asquith was almost equally emphatic in his speech in Liverpool on Thursday night. These declarations mean that the abyss between the belli- gerents still yawns wide and deep and that the emergency bridge thrown across it by the Pope has collapsed in the chasm. Not a cheerful prospect for the world, since it necessarily means the prolongation of the war. "What reflec- tive people here are asking is whether there is any assurance, even after an- other year of war, with all its terrible sacrifices, that we shall he able to impose our will on Germany in regard to Alsace- Lorraine ? Alsace-Lorraine. I Certain it is that this country did not enter the war for the sake of restoring to France the two provinces torn from "her bleeding side in 1871. Yet it is natural that France, after her sufferings and valour in this war, should desire compensation for her sacrifices hy their restitution. And the Germans have only themselves to thank for the emergence of this question as a primary war aim of the Allies. They frilled the war and they must endure its consequences. It was a blunder of the first magnitude for Germany in 1871 .to..aIllleX two .provinces that were French to the cere. That act •of brutal force was the principal causc of I the monstrous armaments which in the past quarter-oi'-a-century made Eutrope even in peace time an armed camp. In- stead of trying to heal the wound she in- flicted Germany aggravated it by her treatment of the French population in the annexed provinces. Their language was proscribed they were denied political rights; they were harried and persecuted under a stupid and tyrannical regime. Had Alsace-Lorraine been treated sym- pathetically, had its people been given political rights, the annexation might' have been acquiesced in. But the Ger- mans chose the other way until the an- nexed territory became a chronic ulcer in ?illie I c h i-oiil(! il l eor illi her own body politic, until French people emigrated by the thousand to escape from n rule they detested, while those who re- mained looked with infinite longing to France to liberate them from the alien yoke. Europe Sleeting. Doubtless at the present time there is « German majority in the two provinces --the result of the French exodus and of the large influx of German settlers. This it is which explains w hy i ranee is un- willing to accept the Socialist suggestion of a plebiscite of the population in Alsace Lorrsizie to ascertain its wishes as to the future government of the provinces. France's, demand is for complete restor- ation without condition or qualification. Germany on the other hand declares that. t-he will fight to the death rather than give up a single stone of what she won in 1870-1. Between these two mutually antagonistic declarations no compromise is possible; and until one or other abates her pretensions Europe must go on bleed- ing to d?th..?m?y in the ?1? that ?t' logic of the stricken field may cut a knot l?)gic of the liti-icli(,ii f,,cld iiiiv etit a kiiot ti?at st.,it(,sjiiatl-,Ij) P is Uot in Germany and elsewhere have brought Europe to a sorry pass. No wonder they arc drawing on their heads the execra- tions of the people in every country.

Disgraceful Church Scene ♦-

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