Hide Articles List

25 articles on this Page

Advertising

Advertising

-I I Gambling among Boys I

A RECKLESS CYCLIST.I

Volunteer Battalion.I ——4…

[No title]

[No title]

1Welcome Home ill

I150 Guineas 6

I.Pwll Notes.I ♦

Football Outfits 1 Required.

[No title]

[No title]

[No title]

Sugar Distribution. »—

I LLANELLY V.T.C.

I OBITUARY

TRACTION CO.'S EMPLOYE KILLED.…

[No title]

[No title]

[No title]

To the Bitter End. +

News
Cite
Share

To the Bitter End. + I STIRRING SPEECHES AT RenRY PORT. I PACIFISTS WARMLY TROUNCED. I A War Aims meeting was held at Burry Port on Monday evening. I The Mad Mullah. Mr. Towyn Jones, speaking in Welsh, with much force, said that after all the great sacrifices Great Britain and her Allies had made, we must not falter nor be depressed when we were on the point of securing victory. He could not under- stand the attitude of the pacifists. They had some excuse for all the atrocities of Germany, but on the other hand they failed to appreciate and give full credit for the great sacrifices and heroic deeds of their own kith and kin. As to Ger- many's reply to the Pope's Note, Mr. Towyn Jones described it ws a mere garble of words, evading important points, and trying to throw the responsi- bility for the carnage on other nations. The hon. member said he desired peace, but peace by negotiation was at present impossible. How could we negotiate with a "Mad Mullah" like the Kaiser, whose words are full of sound of fury, and whose clutches still extended over the countries of innocent neighbours. The world yearned for the sovereignty of democracy, but that could not be realized except by extinguishing Kaiserism. Duty to Posterity. I Mr. Gieve said We are one great I I -NVe are one great. united nation today (ap^ause). We have one purpose and one purpose only. What is that purpose? It is the duty today, of every right-thinking man to remember what his ancestors have done before him. We must carry on the fight and leave the world a little hetter place than it was when we came to it. There were people who could cry for a premature peace, a peace which would inflict upon humanity in the future the same calamity as we are now witnessing. If it were accomplished we should go down to the fn + ure not with the blessings of posterity, but with the ei-rses (applause). j I No politics. Our advance is slow and people are say- ing "We have only got so far after all this time." It is a great deal easier to kill the Germans where they stand than to follow them. The soldier is doing his work—and doing it well; it is up to the civilian at home to supp-rt him to the ut- most. (applause). "We have forgotten today every little political difference. There is a greater object than party.—the freedom of the world, at stake. There can only be one peace—when Germany is crushed (loud applar.se). We have got to see this thing through to the bitter end (applause). Success is looming in front of us; let us see to it that we obtain the victory which will make secure a perfect peace (ap- plause). Civilization with us. Mr. Shippabot-ham roundly trounced the pacifists. "Civilisation is on our s ide." he said. The war was plannecl hy Germany and found nt unprepared. It is said that we wc re as responsible as Germany for the war, That is not true (applause), and the pacifists knnT; it. To- j day the Kaiser talks and says that his one aim has been to maintain the peace of the world. That is not true! He did not talk like that in the early months of the war. He was then Oil!, to ride roughshod through Europe." Powerless Socialists, Proceeding, he ridiculed the notion held by some people of the power of the Socialists in the Reichstag or in Germany "In the German Parliament they don't count. There were- people who said they did not see what different it would i-iakc if the Germans came over here1. Remem- ber, that it is not the Social Democrats that will come over here, it is not the S.'cial Democrats who will rule but the Prussians (applause). You know what tiiey did m Belgian after a snort resist- i auco think y»<u that we should fare bet- ter a fter thwarting their purpose for you that your protestations of trade union rights on have sacrificed a little liberty, a little freedom. a little justice. Think you you would have more freedom, more justice ur more liberty under Germany? Selfish PccMiesr. j Dealing with the refusal of pacifists to aah t. Mr Shippalvthnr!! bitterly vent on: Toe greatest idealism i- to lay down one"? life for someone else. I don't sav every- I ?:? must do it. Lut mat is the supreme i?? T'- ?-- paei;—-L 11 oJee:t to other pcci?p b-yiJ1 Jo?-? their lives for them."

IASTERISKS, ———*

I ~~ ! CLARKE'S THE MAN.

? ..?F TMp DAY 1 NOTES OF…