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Perabrcy Fatality 4k--

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War Time Recreation. —*.—

.-I In a Stable.I

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-I Occasional Notes I ———-———i

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I Occasiona l Notes I ——— -——— i [By Arthur Mee.] I WRIGGLING DOWN. I I suppose there can be no coubt that at long last Germany is beginning to climb down, or rather, to wriggle down— I a better way of putting it perhaps. Her 1 chiefs. know they cannot win, and her people arc beginning to suspect the cruel and unpalatable truth. As they cannot j carry out their hellish programme of* victory and unspeakable murder and out- rage, no doubt they hope that- they may still "save the pieces" and so perhaps be able to prepare for another war later oil. A orettv scheme doubtless. It is for the Allies to see that German militarism is wiped out, that its teeth Are drawn and its claws cut. Moreover, there must not 1 1 1 1 t T. only be amp l e reparation, but the Kaiser and the rest of the man-devils must be severely punished. If this -cannot be achieved then in the opinion of most of us we shall only have gained a hollow victory. If the German people wait to save their face they can do it after a fashion by throwing over the bloody j scoundrels who have led them to the verge of ruin and delivering up those same scoundrels to the stern justice of the Allies. Whatever punishment these leaders receive will not be a hundredth I part of what they deserve. WHAT WE HAVE ESCAPED. II Let us not think of what Germany has done or not done, but what she intended j I to do. And what was that ? She in- tended amongst other things to invade ¡ the United Kingdom, to destroy London and all our cities, to murder or enslave our men and to ravish our women. She intended to fill this dear land with hor- ror and with outrage. 'Yhat she did in Belgium was but child's play to what she intended doing over here. This is no nightmare. It is the sober truth. It is what her officers boasted. The dream of I converting these islands into a red hell has kept the German people going nil this; time, and some of them believe still I that they can manage to accomplish it. As it is, they liaYe done their wont: Can we forgive this fearful people t Perhaps we can; hut we shall he mad if we ever forget. Reader, until Germany is on her knees at the stool of sincere re- pentance let us keep her sternly aloof, let us refuse intercourse with her in any form, let no German enter our land, let I, no German vessel touch at our ports. The Germans must be made to know their place and to keep it. Never can we trust them again. I ALAN LEO. I Perhaps not many of your readers arc in touch with the work of Alan Leo, the I news of whose death has come upon me with a very painful shock. Alan Leo was an extremely able astrologer, and his volumes large and small dealing with the art of which he was a master are classics never likely to be excelled. But Allan Leo was more than an astrologer. He was a powerful intellectual and moral force, and his death at a comparatively early age leaves a gap which it will be impossible to fill. I approached his work Yfith considerable prejudice, which a closer acquaintance with his writings swept away. It is not too much to assert that what CamiHeFlammanon is j < to astronomy Alan Leo was to the astro- i logical world.. He .wielded a graphic, 1 luminous and at times most eioquent pen. He had a mission and he threw himself into the work of that mission with tireless vigour and enthusiasm. I owe it to his writings that he helped me to a clearer understandng ci things as I now conceive them to be. The keynote j of his teaching was just this-that Character is Destiny.What we sow that we shall reap. So says the Old | Dook, and if wo only realized those preg- nant awful words the world would be a different place from what i: is to-day. ) Huxley says somewhere that God keeps His ledgers with punctilious accuracy. Not a job or a tittle is wanting in the I great account, and we shall have to answer and repay to the iitteri-nost farthing. This then is (as has been well said) the Divine use of astrology, a science so ancient and so noble, yet so j shamefully degraded of late years. A I man's horoscope shows a man, not as his fellows see him but as he is. It is I the exact reflection of the individual him- self. He may hoodwink his neighbour and deceive hi$ most intimate friend;, ¡¡Ill. c,çç<J\'e IS 1ll0st mtlll1ate fricnd; 'hut he cannot get away ?-om that stern and awful test. Mere lip-service will not do, the mouthing of a creed will not j suffice, formal attendance at service is a I sham, snivelling on a death-bed goes for 1 nought. "What a man soweth that shall be also reap." We come into the world bearing a burden of responsibility. You can call it original sin if you like. Any- thing that holds a true mirror before your face, is a good thing. And such a • iL. J- ~«r. thing is the ancielit, science oi HIe &mis. Thanks to the labours of such men as Alan Leo astrology is being better known and tens of thousands have to thank him for the light he has thrown upon the theme and indirectly upon their own mis- j giviugs and perplexities. His mortal j part is in the grave; a wiser generation, will give him the honour that is his due.

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Into Molten Metal.I

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! Sale of House |Properties.…

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