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.:NOTES ON HEWSL I

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NOTES ON HEWSL I Party politics ceased with the outbreak I of war. Some' people believe that there I LABOUR'S NEW MOVE. will never be party poli- tics any more, while others are of opinion that they are only in a state I of suspense, and will revive again when the war is over. Probably there will always be parties, though labels and poli- cies may be changed. It is clear, at any rate, that the Labour Party expects to be very much- alive- after the war. It has formulated a new constitution, and an- nounces that it will welcome into its fold ill future producers by brain as well as "producers by hand." The announcement appears to have caused something of a sen- sation, as though to include in its mem- bership brain-workers as well as manual- workers was something entirely new for the Labour Party. One has only to recall the names of prominent men in the party to see that some of them are not, and I never have been. employed in the mine, the factory, or the workshop. They are "producers by brain," and have entered the Labour Party as members of some affi- liated society. It is in this particular that a change has been made. There will be no need of such a channel in future. Whoever wishes to join the Labour Party will be able to do so through the local organisation as easily as he (or she) can join any other party. There will be no need to qualify by membership of a trade union, a Socialist society, or anything else. The Labour Party is looking ahead. Its organisers have an eve upon the Reprcsen- AFTER THE NEW VOTERS. tation of the People Bill, and the millions of elec- tors, both men and women, who will be added to the register by its meall. Never since party organisations came into being has there been such an army of possible re- cruits. How will all these new votes be cast when a general election comes ? It is an interesting speculation. Evidently the Labour Party means to get as many ef them as possible. So it came along in good time with its policy and its new con- stitution. Its making the admission of "producers by brain easier than it has been is undoubtedly a wise move. In the past there has been a widespread opinion that the Labour Party was the party of the trade unionists, and that its main work in the world was to obtain higher wages and better working conditions for the "producers by hand." Its new con- stitution and policy will correct that idea, and no doubt it will obtain its due propor- tion of members from all classes in the same way as the older parties. An entirely new political party has made Us bow within the past few days. The THE CO-op. LN POLITICS. co-operative societies have decided to enter into politics, with all their millions of members. Their decision appears to have been taken in consequence of the Prime Minister's disinclination to receive a deputation of co-operators. At least, he could not make it convenient to receive them when they wanted him to, and when he did consent they said it was too late. A clear case of "He that will not when he may, When he will ho shall have nay." So the co-operators are going to make themselves a political power, and one gathers that they intend to make things hot for somebody. The membership of the societies is so vast that if they could be persuaded to act in politics as a united body they would become a power indeed. But can they? Anybody with electioneer- ing experience knows that, however united and whole-hearted members of these socie- ties may be in the purpose for which the societies primarily exist, when it comes to politics proper they are of all shades of opinion. There are Conservative as well as Liberal co-operators, Free Traders and Tariff Reformers, Labourites and Social- ists. Will it be possible to unite all these, with their varying opinions, in favour of any possible political programme? For a political party must have other planks in its platform besides that of sharing profits from the manufacture and sale of commo- dities. America has issued a highly important statement with regard to its embargo on AMERICA AND THE BLOCKADE. tra de with neutral nations. The Allied blockade of Germany has been something less than complete owing to the difficulty of dealing with Holland and the Scandinavian countries. While America was a neutral there was the danger of trouble with her if the Allies put drastic measures into operation. But now America is one of the Allies, with a very powerful voice in the business. Three months ago she warned the neutrals against supplying Germany with commodities which had their origin in the United States, and re- quested them to give information concern- ing their consumption, production, and re- quirements of all commodities, especially foodstuffs. The statement now issued says that some of the neutral countries have persisted in sending large quantities of vital supplies to Germany and her allies, in spite of the warning, and that repeated requests for information as to what these countries need for their own sustenance have met with little response. The United States Government, therefore, has decided to deny export licences so long as the in- formation is withheld, and so long as the countries concerned continue to help Ger- many as they have been doing. The United States is prepared to help the neutrals, even at a sacrifice, but it demands, quite fairly, a guarantee that the supplies fur- nished "will not be turned against us to prolong the war and teo kill our sons." The new national housing scheme will be I controlled and directed by the Local Gov- NATIONAL HOUSING SCHEME. ernment Board. Reports received from local authorities s how that throughout the country about 100,000 new work- men's dwellings are urgently required, and it is stated that under the scheme from 150,000 to 200,000 will be erected to meet the after-war conditions. So that for some time after the end of the war there should be plenty of work for all connected with the building trade. The type and size of the houses will vary according to the dis- trict in which they are to be built, but all the parts will be standardised, from bricks to window-fittings. Perhaps the picture called up by this announcement is not a very attractive one, but a statement by Mr. Henry Aldridge, secretary of the National Housing and Town Planning Council, is reassurin g on that head. He said: In future there would be origin- ality in the design of the house, and that for the labourer could be just as artistic as that of the rich man." Under the natio- nal scheme gardens for food cultivation will be provided in every possible case, and the Local Government Board will encour- age the local authorities to purchase land for this purpose, it being realised that the working man's garden will be of national value in the years of world-shortage of food following the war.

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SIR DOUGLAS HAIG'S MESSAGE…

MOTHER'S FUTILE JOURNEY. I

A RUSSIAN EXEMPTION.I

I FEAR OF BURIAL ALIVE.I

ISUCCESSFUL RAID BY ARABS.…

IA DOUBLE tRAGEDY. I

ILORD BUXTON'S SON KILLED.…

!SIR W. P. BYLES, M.P., DEAD.J

I BARRISTER SPECIALS. I

IRAMADIE'S VICTOR DECORATED.…

I FAMOUS SHIPOWNER DEAD. I

ITEA PRICES FIXED.I

I GIRL SET ALIGHT BY BOY.I

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ICLOB WINDOW. I

I J "CANNING THE KAISER."…

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DRESS OF THE DAY.-.-I ——.——

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TURKISH FORCES DRIVEN ACROSS…

I VOLUNTEERS AND EXEMPTION.…

I DRUGGED WITH CIGARETTE.…

I BRUGES DOCKS BOMBED..I

I REV. T. SPURGEON DEAD.I

I FOOD FOR PRISONERS. I

I KING HOLDS INVESTITURE.I

I 44THE NATION" BAN REMOVED.I

I AIR RAID SICKNESS BENEFIT.II

NO TIME FOR SORROWS.j

VICAR'S SUDDEN DEATH. i

BURGLARY FROM RAILWAY.

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