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To remove coffee stains, stretch the napkin or tablecloth over a basin and pour hot water through the cloth. Soak iron rust stains thoroughly with temon-juice, sprinkle with salt, and bleach for several hours in the sun. Stained floor boards can be cleaned by acrubbing with chloride of lime, using but a tablespoonful to a pail of water. If you drop grease on the kitchen floor, scatter soda on it, and then pour boiling water on it. The spots will come out easily. A little sugar added to oatmeal when it is cooking', instead of putting it all on the table, improves the flavour greatly. When brooms begin to wear, cut the bristles level again, and the brilsh will do its work as well as ever. Always rinse black stockings in blue water, and they will keep a good colour right on to the end. Damp knives slightly before rubbing. You will find it cleans the knives quickly and much easier for yourself, and gives a very bright polish. If new tinware is rubbed over with fresh (ard and thoroughly heated in the oven before it is used, it will never rust after- wards, no matter how much it is put in water. If new enamel pans are placed in a pan of water and allowed to come to the boil and then cool. they will be found to last miwh longer without burning or cracking. A little ^rushed borax, if sprinkled thickly on a flannel cloth that is wet with hot water and well soa ped will brighten coppcrware. To freshen rusty black lace, soak it in vinegar and water, two tablespoonfuls of vinegar to a pint of water. Rinse and iron while damp between flannels. To make candles last longer, take each one by the wick and give it a coat of white varnish. Leave to dry thoroughly. Never allow new soap to be used. It is so soft that it lathers away in no time. It is real economy to buy soap in large quanti- ties, so that it is not in use until it is dry and hard all through. WHEN MAKING A PUDDING. When lining a basin with paste for a beef- steak pudding cut a piece of the paste away from the bottom, about the size of half a crown, then put in the meat aa usual, and it will be found that the pudding will take an hour less to cook than if lined in the ordinary way. GLASSWARE. Articles of glass, such as tumblers, fruit dishes, lamp chimneys, globes, and other similar bric-a-brac, can be mended with a preparation of five parts of gelatine to one part of a solution of bi-chromate of potash. Cover the broken edges with this and pre. together, then place in direct sunlight for a few hours. To PREVENT MILK BURNING. Always before filling the pan rinse it thoroughly with cold water. Some women grease the bottom of the pan with butter previous to filling it with milk. Both pre- cautions are effective if the pan is not set on a very fierce fire. To prevent milk boil- ing over, which not only causes waste of a valuable commodity but produces a very dis- agreeable and permeating odour, get an ordinary pie-chimney and place it in the centre of the pan. When it begins to boil the milk boils up through the little chimney, and there is no danger of its boiling over. A pie-chimney and a frying basket should be found amongst kitchen utensils every- where, even in the humblest homes, for their cost is almost nil, and the saying effected by the use of either, or both, is very con- siderable. IHONING HINTS. To cool an iron, stand it on end with the flat surface exposed to the air. To cleanse the iron, place a piece of beeswax between two pieces of flannel and rub the iron on it. When ironing woollen goods never rub the iron on them as this twists the fibre. Press firmly and iron in one direction only. When ironing silk blouses, spread a starched tablecloth over the ironing sheet. This will not only make the blouse look like new, but it will last much longer. Keep two iron- holders going so that when one becomes hot another can be substituted. This prevents the hands from becoming tired and the skin harsh. SOME USEFUL RECIPES. VEGETABLE PUDDING.—Take one cupful of chopped apples, one cupful of chopped car- rots, and a cupful of chopped potatoes. Add a cupful and a half of flour, one quarter of a pound of currants, one quarter of a pound of sultanas, one quarter of a pound of butter, half a teaspoonful of spice, a saltspoonful of carbonate of soda, mix well, and put in a buttered basin. Steam for three hours. STUFIED SPANISH ONIONS.—Take three Spanish onions and peel them, but do not break the skin, and with a vegetable cutter take out the core. Blanch them in water for five minutes. Remove from the water care- fully, and stuff the centres with sausage meat. Place a piece of short pastcjy over the hole to prevent the juice earning out, and bake in a tin containing stock. Baste occa- 6inally to prevent burning. CURRIED LENTILS.—Soak overnight one breakfastcupful of lentils in cold water. Next day boil in sufficient water to cover them, adding three ounces of butter, a tea- spoonful of vinegar, and a salttspoonful of salt. Stir constantly to prevent burning. When all the water is absorbed and the len- t" reduced to a smooth paste, add a tea- ,,iiftil of curry powder, and an onion chopped finely and fried in butter to a deep brown. Make all very hot, and pile in the centre of a dish with a border of rice. LEMON BUTTER FOR TARTS.-One pound of pounded loaf-sugar, half a pound of butter beaten to a cream, the grated rind of two lemons, and the juice; let these simmer, in a well-tinned saucepan, on the fire for ten minutes, then add five eggs, well beaten, stir the mixture over the fire for a few minutes longer, but do not allow it to boil. A little more sugar may be necessary. It is then ready for use. MUTTON HAMS. —Select a small, short leg of mutton. Rub it thoroughly with coarse sugar ard leave it for twelve hours, turning it two or three times during that period. Have ready the following pickle: Half pound of bay salt, lb. common salt. l}oz. butter, J^oz. juniper berries, a pinch of sweet thyme, half a dozen bay leaves, and two o larls of water. Place it in a pan and simmer together for an hour. When luke- warm place the leg of mutton in the pickle with any of the sugar that remains over. This may remain in pickle any time for three weeks. Then take it out, and, if pos- sible have the joint smoked, but, if not, place it in a calico bag and hang it in a drv place until it is required for use. Boil it like an ordinary ham. adding peppercorns, "bay leaves, and lemon peel to the water tdurinp the process.

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