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DUBLIN "QUITE SAFE": ALL REBELS…

COUNTESS AMONG THE PRISONERS.I

[No title]

STORY OF THE RISING. I

THE REBEL MANIFESTO.

POLICE AMBUSHED.I

I KING S TRIBUTE TO SHAKESPEARE.…

RUSSIAN PRISONER'S APPEAL.…

TELEGRAPH HOURS SHORTENED.…

CAPTAIN MURDERED AT SEA. I

IROSES FOR THE QUEEN. I

I CRICKETER'S SON KILLED.

STUDYING WHILE INTERNED.

WASTE IN MATCHES.i

[No title]

FALL OF KUT.

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FALL OF KUT. GEN. TOWNSHEND SURRENDERS AFTER MEMORABLE RESISTANCE. I SIEGE OF 143 DAYS. On Saturday evening the Se-cretary of the War Office issued the following announce- ment: "After a resistance protracted for 143 days, and conducted with a gallantry and fortitude that will be for ever memorable, General Townshend has been compelled by the final exhaustion of his supplies to sur- render. "Before doing so he destroyed his guna and munitions. "The force under him consists of 2,970 British troops of all ranks and services, some 6,000 Indian troops, and their fol- lowers. General Townshend's force originally con- sisted of about 14,000 men. Its task was the capture of Bagdad, and it fought its way almost to within sicrht of that Il famous city before encountering Turkish forces in such numbers that retreat was forced on ita commander. Probably not more than 8,000 men were available for fighting when the force turned at' Kut. It fought until casualties and sick- ness reduced it to a unit of small military importance. Weather conditions and other difficulties interfered very seriously with the efforts of the forces sent to the relief of Kut. There were more troops than the available river transport could handle. One piece of par- ticular bad luck was the loss at sea during a gale of a number of special boats sent out to supplement the scanty supply in Mesopotamia. I GALLANTRY ON THE TIGRIS. SUPPLY SHIP AGROUND FOUR MILES OFF RUT. The Secretary of the War Office an- nounces An attempt made on the night of April 24 to send a .ship with supplies to the Anglo-Indian force shut up at Kut, though carried out with the utmost gallantry, has unfortunately failed. Our airplanes have discovered that the ship is aground near Magasif, about four miles east of Kut. I- KING'S PRAISE OF RELIEF FORCE. The following telegram has been despatched to the General Officer commanding the forces at Basra: "Please communicate the following message from His Majesty the King Emperor to G.O.C. Tigris Co-rps: "Although your brave troops have not had the satisfaction of relieving their be- leaguered comrades in Kut, they have, under the able leadership of yourself and subordi- nate commanders, fought with great gal- lantry and determination under most try- ing conditions. "The achievement of relief was denied you by floods and bad weather, and not by the enemy, whom you have resolutely pressed back. I have watched your efforts with admiration, and am satisfied that you have done all that was humanly possible, and will continue to do so in future encounters with the enemy.—George R.I." .EXCHANGE OF WOUNDFD. The War Office announces: Persia and Mesopotamia.-General Lake re- ports that a small British force moved out of I Bushire on April 29 and attacked a hostile force which was strongly entrenched in the vicinity. The enemy were quickly driven off, a:ad our troops returned to Bushire unmolested. Our casualties consisted of one British officer killed and one native Indian trooper wounded. In Mesopotamia a letter, dated May 1, h been received from the Turkish Commander-in- Chief, Khalil Pasha, in which he agrees to ex- change General Townshend's sick and wounded for an equivalent number of Mahometan Turkish prisoners. Hospital and other ships have been sent up to begin the evacuation.

ZEPPELIN RAID

IMEATLESS AND DRINXLESS DAYS.

I -M KING GEORGE CAPTURED."

IPRISON FOR SHOPLIFTING. -\