Skip to main content
Hide Articles List

20 articles on this Page

► . NOTES ON NEWS. 1

News
Cite
Share

► NOTES ON NEWS. 1 "Grousing:" is a well-known habit of I ours as a people. We are, perhaps, too I As OTHERS SEE CS. much given to belittle I our own performances, and we have indulged this weakness to such an I extreme in connection with our part in the war that auite a number of us are per- suaded that we have never taken any step forward until we are driven to it, and that even then we have taken it grudgingly and only stepped 'half way. The danger of this habit of self-depreciation at a time like this is that other people, Allies and neutrals, may be inclined to reckon us up on our own valuation. It is pleasant, therefore, to read the tribute of capable judges from other countries who have visited 11-; and been afforded opportunities to see for themselves the magnitude of the j efforts which are being put forth. It is particularly pleasant when these observers happen to be those who are making com- mon cause with us in the conflict, as in the case of the members of the French Parlia- ment, who at the close of their visit paid a handsome tribute to the part Great Bri- tain and Ireland are playing in the war, in the provision of men, munitions, and money. Their spokesman said that they themselves had never been under any mis- apprehension with regard to the matter. They will now, however, be able to testify to the French people as those who have been and seen for themselves. Another who has been and seen is a dis- tinguished neutral, Mr. Frederick Palmer, A N- AMERICAN VIEW. an American, and one ot the most brilliant war correspondents of the day. He chaffs us good- naturedly in Collier's Weekly" on our habit of "grousing." and our talk of slackers when we have re- cruited three millions of volunteers. Our "grousing," he says, is heard all over the world, and is "taken by those who don't know these stubborn islanders as proof of their failure out of their own mouth." "To read the excerpts from the English papers as published in America," he goes on, "you would think that all the inhabi- tants of Britain were slackers, strikers, and muddlers. As the late Charles A. Dana said It is not news if a dog bites a man. but it is news if a man bites a dog.' The unusual attracts. attention. If the Welsh miners strike, if a society composed of five hundred of the forty million people in the British Isles declares that it is for -tance it non-resistance—that is news. It isn't news if three million Englishmen (Mr. Palmer means Scotsmen. Irishmen, and A\ elshmen as well!) have enlisted to fight, and are undergoing the merciless drill for ten hours a day." Mr. Palmer has sized up the position very neatly. That blockade of ours, which has been so much abused, seems to be something I A REAL BLOCKADE. more than a sham after I all. Indeed, according to news from the other side of the Atlantic, it appears I to be remarkably effective. This news supplies an effectual answer to the sensa- tional stories of enormously increased ex- ports from America to neutral countries, and thence to Germany. We are now told that American exports to Norway, Sweden, Denmark, and Holland have declined from more than seven millions sterling in one week in March last year to less than two millions sterling in the corresponding week of this year. These figures represent goods sent from America. As to the value of the good that actually reached their destina- tion we have no means of knowing, but it is quite certain that nothing like seven million pounds' worth was landed while this year two millions were subjected to examination and rigorous tests. So far from the blockade being a sham, it is quite evident that very little gets through to Germany that can be of use to lie Things said are remembered by the public longer than things done for which SOMETHING DONE. reason Mr. Churchill s re- mark that if the German ships would not come out I they would be dug out  I .1 1=1  like rats out of a note is constantly quoted bv people as though it detracted in some measure from the part he played in having the Fleet at war stations before war broke cut. Yet the thing said was unimportant, a mere piece of rhetoric, while the thing done was the most decisive and the most far-reachinsr in effect of anything yet ac- I complished in the war. There is no need at this time of day to enlarge upon its effects; they are, or ought to be. well known to everybody. At one stroke, and without a gun being fired, a great victory was won, and the German Fleet, second only to our own in the world, was reduced to impotence. Yet we have people com- plaining, as Lord Montagu did the other day, of the "stagnation between the It is ti-tic that Fleets in the North Sea." It is true that there has been no sea fighting of import- ance for; fifteen months, and that the Ger- mans have not been dug out like rats. No- body regrets this more than the Navy, but it is at least certain that all the advan- tages of the position are on our side, while the euemy suffers under all the disadvan- tages. While so many people of the middle and I professional classes are complaining that How Is IT DOE 1" owing to the mcreaseo I cost of living they are un- I able to make ends meet, it would be interesting to know how the thing is managed in many I working-class households where the income has been raised very littie. if at all. above the pre-war standard. Viiere are many such, for though it is constantly atserted that the workers are now earning double or treble what Hhey were earning before the war, it should not be forgotten that this applies only to those who are directly engaged on war work in one form or another. There is still a great army of workers who are working for the same wage or are receiving nothiig more in the way of "extras" than a war bonus of three or four shillings a week. a mere trifle when one considers that the cost of living has risen by something like fifty per cent. How do they manage P We see middle-class people filling columns in the newspapers explaining how they economise, how they have solved, among others, the servant problem, by getting rid of their maids and employing a charwoman four days a week. But what would be really interesting is to know how the thing is done in those work- ing-class households where the income is from twenty-five to forty-five shillings a week, where husbands, wives, and families have to be fed and clothed, and where economy, even before the war, was a stern necessity. It is a pity that the wives of the workers do not write articles for the papers explaining how thev do it. 1;n- happily all their time is tak-n up in doing it.

MEN ESCAPE FROM GERMANY.I

FALL OF TREBIZOND. ]

CLOSING THE WAR LOAN. I

iDOCTOR'S WILL DISPUTED. I

I GERMAN FINED AT DOVER. I

THE BRITISH FRONT.

FIGHTING FOR KUT. I

KINGS MESSAGE TO TSAR. I

UNSHADED RECTORY LIGHT. I

IABSURDITY OF THE LAW. I

IAIRMAN KILLED AT BOURNEMOUTHI

[No title]

I IN LIGHTER VEIN. I

IKNOWN AS "SNEEZE-WOOD.' I

TEA TABLE TALK.I

KINDS OF SHRAPNEL I

[No title]

, OUR CHILDREN'S CORNER.

[No title]