Skip to main content
Hide Articles List

18 articles on this Page

OUR LONDON LETTER. I

News
Cite
Share

OUR LONDON LETTER. I IFrom 01W Special Correspondent. ] These are dull days in the House of Com- mons. There is very little to do but formal business., and the asking and answering of questions arising out of the war. We cannot have speeches by the Chancellor of the Ex- chequer and the First Lord of the Admir- alty every day, and even the harrying of the Home Secretary is a lees popular enterprise than it used tb be before it was officially stated that dealing with enemy aliens is a matter for which the War Office is chiefly responsible. The debate on the increased food prices caused some excitement, and at one time it looked as though a division would be taken i on the question. In the end, however, the matter was talked out. As prices are still rising, however, it will doubt- less be heard of again. Members listened with interest also to the War Office state- ment showing how much commission their buyer of timber has earned in a few months, and there were suggestions that ex- pert service equally valuable to the country could have been secured for considerably less money. Beyond these things there has been very little excitement. The political truce is, still maintained, and it is much to the credit cf all parties that there is no sign of its being broken. Liberals and 'Unionists, National- ists and Labour members, are all brothers and all patriots. Members of all the parties are serving with either the naval or the mili- tary forces, and there is never a sitting without some of them appearing in uni- form. Criticism of the Government, when there is any, is of a mild and friendly cha- racter, and the leaders of the Opposition help the Government in every possible way. "Phere are no late sittings, and members are generally able to get home comfortably to dinner. It is generally expected that there will be another recess before Easter, and after that it would not be surprising if the Government were to decide that Parliament shall only sit three days a week. By April most, of the supplies for the year will have been voted, and it is expected that three days a week will be ample for the trans- action of business. There. have been complaints that in some cases the separation allowances are not being forwarded as promptly as they might be to the wives of soldiers. These cases are, how- ever, exceptions, and as a general rule there has been no delay. The House of Commons wa.s much gratified the other day to hear that the wife of., the. only p-rivate soldier tnember of Parliament received her separa- tion allowance within a week of her hus- band's enlistment. The private is Sir Her- bert Raphael, member for South Derbyshire, who, has joined the Sportsman's Battalion. Sir Herbert is one of the wealthiest mem- bers of the House, and there were roars of laughter when Mr. Ronald McNeill gravely expressed his gratification that by the pay- ment of the separation allowance the War Office had placed Lady Raphael immediately beyond the possibility of destitution. To carry out the joke, a journalist called upon Lady Raphael, who confirmed the statement, adding that she is receiving sixteen shillings a week. The reporter inquired whether she found the amount sufficient for her needs, and, in case it was more than sufficient, .what she proposed to do with the balance! Many worthy people find a curious fascination in connecting the war in some way or other with the prophecies of Scrip- ture. The writer of a letter in the "Times" gives an amusing instance of the futility of such "exegetical exercises." An East 'Anglian vicar has sent him a postcard, ask- ing: "How many kingdoms are contained in the German Empire? Is it ten or eight? If the first number, they constitute, I think, the ten mentioned in Revelation xvii. 12; if the later, Austria and Hungary make the other two." Unfortunately for the vicar, he is wrong either way. There are only four kingdoms in the German Empire, and if he means States, then there are twenty-six. He must guess again. British manufacturers ought to support with enthusiasm the latest move in the cam- paign for capturing German and Austrian trade. This is the transference of the famous Leipzig Fair from Leipzig to London. It is quite certain that even if Leipzig has its fair this year at all it must be a much. smaller concern than usual, and the opportunity is undoubtedly a good one for attracting the buyers of the world to London instead of to the German city. The industries represented at the Fair are not the greatest, but even so the v.he of the orders annually booked at Leipzig was something like C46,000,060, of which the orders from Great Britain and the Dominions totalled < £ 9,000,000. A share of this is certainly worth making an effort to get, and the London Fair will be held in the Agricultural Hall in May. Only British manufacturers will be allowed to exhibit, and the trades represented will be toys and games, earthenware and china, glass, fancy goods, cutlery, electro-plate, clocks, cheap jewellery, stationery and printing. The Board of Trade is making the arrange- ments. One of the most moving sights of London these days is the disabled soldiers who have come home from Germany, having been ex- changed for wounded Germans. These heroes, broken in the war, are at present being cared for at the Millbank Hospital. Splendid fellows they are, cheerful and courageous in spite of their condition. An appeal for motor-cars to give the men trips about London met with an immediate re- sponse, and they have vastly enjoyed them- selves. It is very pleasant to see the pride and admiration felt by the people for these heroes who have been disabled while fight- ing our battles. Hats are raised as the cars pass along, and in Hyde Park the men have been heartily cheered. Among the "fairy tales told to them in Germany during their captivity were stories of the bombard- ment of London by Zeppelins and other air- craft. "Of course," said one of them, "we did not believe the yarns." Still, it was re- assuring to find that Buckingham Palace, the Houses of Parliament, the War Office, and the Admiralty were still standing. If you happened to be a waiter or a waitress and a customer asked for "two Zeppelins on a snow-cloud," I wonder what you would get for him. Perhaps, remember- ing the shape of Zeppelins, you might guess what he meant, and provide him with the homely sausages and mashed. But not everybody would be so smart. I heard the order given the other day to an elderly Italian waiter who was very much puzzled by it, and not until the order had been translated into Fleet-street English did the customer succeed in getting what u he desired. A. E. M.

[No title]

I RIOT AT IN6APORE RIOT AT…

I NO 'AM BONES. I.II

LIFEBOAT TWICE CAPSIZED. I

aI jDIFFERENT.I

PASSING THE DOCTOR. I

I STRANGE. -- I

[No title]

[No title]

[No title]

IHEROES OF THE WAB. I

ITHE RIFLES OF THE ARMIES.…

[No title]

[No title]

[No title]

THINGS THOUGHTFUL

[No title]