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SNIPERS FARE BADLY -—.0—-

A HOUSE BLOWN BODILY INTO…

TWO MILLION VOLUNTEERS -——<.-——

BOGUS V.C. HERO SENTENCED.…

WOUNDED AGAIN FIT FOR SERVICE.…

IMORE WAR NEWS. I

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IIN THE PUBLIC EYE.1

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VICEROY'S DEPARTURE,I VICEROY'S…

IFIRST BULLETIN. I

VERDICT FOR MILLINER SET ASIDE.…

SEVENTEEN LIVES LOST IN THE…

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GREATER AIR RAID.I

SNIPER'S ADVENTURE.I

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SNIPER'S ADVENTURE. I CANADIAN OFFICER'S EXCITING EXPERIENCE. A Canadian officer on service ia Franco, writing from the firing line, gives a thrill- ing account of a sniping encounter in a. letter which is printed in the "Daily Tele- graph." He says: Off I went, crawlino, through the sodden clay and branches, going about a yard P, minute, listening and looking; I went out to the right of our lines, where the Ger- mans were nearest. It took about thirty minutes to do thirty yards. Then I saw the Hun trench, and waited for a long time, but could see or hear nothing. It was about ten yards from me. Then I heard some Germans talking, and saw one put his head up over some bushes about ten yards behind the trench. I could not get a shot at him, as I was too low down. Of course, I could not get up, so I crawled on again, very slowly, to the parapet of their trench. It was exciting. I was not sure that there might not have been somebody there, or a little farther along the trench. I peered through their loophole, saw nobody in the trench, then the German behind put up his head again. He was laughing and talking. I saw his teeth glisten against my foresight, and I pulled the trigger. He just gave a grunt and crumpled up. The others got up and whispered to each other. I do not know who were most frightened, they or 1. There were five of them. They could not place the shot. I was flat behind their parapet and hidden. I just had the nerve not to move a muscle and stay there; my heart was fairly hammering. They did not come forward. I could not see them, as they were behind some bushes and trees, so I crept back, inch by inch. The next day, just before dawn, I crawled out there again, and found it empty again. Then a single German came through the- woods towards the trench. I saw him fifty yards off. He was coming along upright,. quite carelessly, making a great noise. I heard him before I saw him. I let him get within twenty-five yards and shot him in the heart. He never made a sound. Nothing happened for ten minutes. Then there was noise and talking, and a lot of Germans came along through the wood behind the trench, about forty yards from me. I counted about twenty, and there were more coming. They halted in front. S picked out the one I thought was the officer. He stood facing the other way, and I had a steady shot at him between the shoul- ders. He went down, and that was all I saw. I went back at a sort of galloping crawl to our lines and sent a message that the Germans were moving in a certain direc- tion in some numbers. Half an hour after- wards they attacked the right, in massed formation, advancing slowly to within ten yards of the trenches. We simply mowed' them down. It was rather horrible. They counted 200 dead in a little bit of a line,. and we only lost ten. 4 They were pleased about the stalking | and getting the message through. It was up to someone to do it, instead of leaving it all to the Germans, and losing two officers a day through snipers. All our men have started it now. It is quite a popular amusement. |

COAST BOMBARDMENT.

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