Skip to main content
Hide Articles List

16 articles on this Page

r- ———— < OUR LONDON LETTER.…

News
Cite
Share

r- ———— < OUR LONDON LETTER. ] [From Our Special Corretpondeni.] I Much the most interesting of the new Miristerial appointments is that of Mr. Neil Primrose, Lord Rosebery's second son, to be "Under-Secretary to the Foreign Omcc. More than a score of years ago'Sir Edward Grey himself was the lieutenant of Lord Rcse- Lery, one of the most brilliant of our Foreign Secretaries. Now Sir Edward has the son of his old cr.icf as his pupil. Lord Robbery began his Ministerial career as Under-Secretary in the Home Om''e, with Sir William Harcourt as his chief. He was, of course, never a member of the House of Commons, and he is seldom seen in th, Peers' Gallery there. I believe the last occasion when he put in an appearance there was on the day when Mr. Neil Primrose, in whose political career his father has alwaya taken the keenest interest, made his maiden speech. It was a very successful eSort. and Mr. Primrose has made many good speeches since. He does not always see eye to eye with }"is distinguished father in political matter; Everybody will remember how he f;ppport;ù Mr. LL'yd George's famous Budget and the Parliament Bill, while Lord PIC,.Ieb,ry roundly condemned them. Women are drilling as well as men. The Women's Volunteer Reserve now has 3,000 members i<i London, and recruits are still coming in. It is a very democratic organi- tation. "Cooks and housemaids," says one account, "rtll in beside women of title." The writer adda, however, "that in a few cases mistresses Lave had to transfer to another company because they found themselves forming fours' with their own servants, which did nut seem quite expedient." It would be mo'e awkward still, of course, for a duchess to "dress by the right" at the word of command given by her own cook, TTomoted to be sergeant. But the women volunteers are very earnest and very enthu- siastic about t'heir drill, and very anxious to be of service. Their object is to make them- selves emcient as signallers, telegraphists, despatch-riders, motorists, and in other ways to fit themselves <o take the places of men so that more men nay be able to go to the firing line. Many of the members ara capital shots, but they do not expect the War Office recognition as an armed corps. Nursing and firt-õt aid are included in the training, and th; members receive instruc-- tioa in simple cooking. Money is one of the most powerful weapons of warfare, and it certainly count' f*)r mere in this war than in any previous war in the world's history. The silvel buUeL; will find their billet as well as the <:ther kind. So far as Great Britain; Fraac' and Russia are concerned, they are coins' to make the most of their silver bullets by uniting their nnaneial resourcea, as they have already done their military ones. This docs not mean a pooling of resources, hut it does mean that the State which is stronger financially will come tc the help of the weaker, so that the success of the campaign shall not be hindered by any sort of financial embarrassment. The three Finance Ministers of the Allies who took part in the momentous conference in Paris last week will recommend to their Governments that the loans made or to be made to Belgium and Serbia shall be taken over in equal shares by the three great Allies, who will aLto share any advances to be made to other countries who may even- tually join the Allies. The question of a big loan, of perhaps X800,000,000 or .81,000,000,000, guaranteed by the three great Powers, has naturally aroused the keenest interest in the City. Six months of war have not affected the theatres as much as most people expected. It was thought that in the general desire to economise people would cut down their amusements expenses, a.nd there were gloomy prophecies of closed theatres and out-of-work actors and actresses. But in spite of the rising cost of living it does not appear that the number of people who seek their amusement at theatres and variety houses is much smaller than it is in peace time, and only about half a dozen theatres a're closed. In many of the others reduced prices are the rule. The darkened streets tmaks the prospect of a.n evening in town less attractive to suburban residents than used to be the cas' but still a gocd number come up, and the theatres get tht:ir audi- ences. The schemes which were tried at one or two theatres of giving afternoon per- formances instead of evening performances did not sucewd. The habit of evening theatre-going is to.> strong to be broken by darkened streets. At more than half the theatres "revi vals" hold the boards. Old plays cost Ic;s than new plays to produce, of course, and besides, they are pretty sure of at any rate a moderately successful run; whereas a new play is not. I have no doubt a good many lady readers arc ju.-c j:ow nndiiig their fancy lightly turning to thoughts of making mar- malade. It will be a more expensive busi- ness this year than usual, owing to the in- crease in the price of sugar. It is possible, too, that oranges themselves may cost more. Co vent Gaiden is not prepared to guarantee that shipments will come along regularly, so that prices may remain at their present level. A good many people believe that all bitter oranges come from Seville, but as a matter of fact Sicily sup- plies a good many of them. Freightages are expensive and ships not so many as could be desired. The supply of bitter oranges may run short, a.nd careful housewives should take time by the forelock. The fruit is declared by experts to be now at its very best. Mr. Arthur Henderson, the Labour Fartv's Chairman, who has done such ex- cellent work in connection with the recruit- ing campaign, must have been interested to see a reference to himself in a German Socialist journal, the "Hamburger Echo. That paper is very much upset because Herr Henderson has been made a Privy Councillor. It declares with contempt that he has been bribed by the title of Eight Honourable, which is "about the same as Excellency," and "a correspondingly princely income." The news a bout the princely income" will be a pleasant surprise for Mr. Henderson. York House is to be the London home of Lord Kitchener. It is an integral part of St. James's Palace, and the King and Queen lived there after their marriage, when they were Duke and Duchess of York. It was the home ot the aged Duchess of Cambridge, and one of its former tenants was the Duke of Cumberland, the nft& son of George III., afterwards King of Hanover. Lord Kitchener purchased a country place, Broome Park, near Canterbury, a few years ago, but he has no town Louse. It is expected that he will enter intr, residence at York House at abcut the end of this month. A. E. M.

[No title]

RECRUITING SATISFACTORY.

GERMAN NAVAL LOSSES.

TORQUAY TRAGEDY.-

IWOMEN LIKE LONDON.

[No title]

[No title]

[No title]

IN THE PUBLIC EYE.I

[No title]

[No title]

[No title]

[No title]

OUR CHILDREN'S CORNER.

[No title]