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A BIT THICK. I

-,.. OUR LONDON LETTER. 1

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I I EXHAUSTED NATURE.I

I .EXPERIENCED.

ITHE LUCKIEST OF ALL

I'A DISGRACE TO HIS TOWN.'

I"ALL THAT WAS LEFT OF THEM."…

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Turpentine is one of the most useful ct washing aid.5. It will loosen dirt without the slightest injury to fabrics. A good way of stiffening the bristles o) hairbrushes after washing is to dip the") into a mixture of equal quantities of ni 'Iii and water, and then dry before the fire. To remove a nsh-bone from the throat, swallow a raw egg. and follow, if possible, by eating plenty of mashed potatoes. The eL,, I will carry the bone into the stomach, aud the potatoes will prevent it from doing any injury there. Soda should be thoroughly dissolved in the washing water before the clothes arc put in. Never allow it to lie about on the clothes, as this sometimes causes ironmould. .'oda should never be added to water in which woollen things are being washed, as it causes them to shrink. Polished floors should be rubbed with a mixture of one-third raw linseed-oil and two-thirds paramn. Use it sparingly, or the polishing attprwards with a dry cloth wili be a long business. For polishing bra.ss bedsteads there is no more reliable medium than the old-fashioned whitening v.'et with household ammonia, v.hich is less apt to scratch than most other preparations. To prevent blue spotting the clothes, put some on a piece of white cloth, gather up the corners, and tie together. Dip this bag in the water, then squeeze it until the water is blue enough. To PREVENT EiTCHEN ODOURS. I Before beginning to fry onions or bolt a cabbage see that the kitchen window is open at the top, and also draw back the gracing above the stove, even if this is only open a little way the smell from whatever is being cocked will have a- means of escape, instead of tilling the kitchen and penetrat- ing to other parts of the house. If this is forgotten, it is a good plan to have some c.'dar wood dust at hand to use, a little scattered over the hot stove gives off a pleasant odour, which will prevent the smells from being noticeable. I-ITKSTAIN.S ON BOOKS, j Inkstains may be removed from paper in the following manner. Firat wash the paper with warm water, ThSing a. camels-hair brush ,?,v i t h m-ariii water, 116int E i a means the surface for the purpose. By this meana the surface i'lk is removed, and the mark should then be moistened with oxalic acid, in the pro- portion of one ounce to half a pint of water. ibe inkstains will immediately disappear. Finally, again wash the stained place with clean water, and dry with white blotting- paper. Greai care must be taken, however, in the use of oxalic acidj as it is a very da.ng'erous poison. To MAKE NiGHT LIGHTS. I Night lights are usually made of ccrasin, cr of a mixture of ceraein or paramn with stearic acid, the latter being in the pro- portion of from five to ten per cant. These tights are moulded, the wick being placed in the mould, or afterwards put in attached to a piece of tinplate. The lights are then placed in small cardboards cases; they are used in a saucer of water. The moulds may be cast in metal; for small quantities they may be made like bullet moulds, to open in two parts; but for larger quantities they may be in the form of shallow troughs with circular depressions and plungers to force the lights out after they are co'd; the latter would be preferable. Night lights weigh- ing !OZ" oz,. loz., and upwards may be made, and by burning these it will be easy to find the size of light that will burn nine hours. ECONOMICAL HOUSEHOLD SiNT. I To keep rooms warm as cheaply as pos- sible, take cobbly coal, slack, or even saw- dust one part, sand, any kind, two parts, clay or marl one part. Mix all together with wat-er until thick as paste, make into small blocks. Put the blocks on top of the tire, above the bars. This will be found to give a great heat and last a coMiderable time if not disturbed. To CLEAN A GAS STOVE. I The gas stove should be cleaned once every week. Remove all bars, and wash in strong soda water. Wash the top of the stove and clean burners, cleaning out the little holes with a fine skewer or piece of wire. Wash the shelves, and clean any enamel linings with rough salt. Blacklead the bars, and polish the brass taps, rub up steel portions with emery powder. SOME USEFUL RECIPES. I OATMEAL PUDDING.—This is very cheap, and as nourishing as a meat pie. Peel four or five onions and drop them into cold water. Put three ounces of dripping into a bowl and place it on the stove to melt. Chop the onions, drain well, and stir into the melted dripping; add half a pound of oat- meal and stir into the dripping and onions till thoroughly mixed. Season with pepper and salt. Wring out a pudding cloth in hot water, flour with oatmeal, pour in the mix- ture, tic lightly, and boil for three hours. Turn out and serve with boiled potatoes. SEED CAKE.—Use a quartern of dough left from making bread; set it in a basin before the fire to rise, first covering it with a cloth. Beat half a pound of butter or dripping to a cream, work it into the dough, and add three-quarters of a pound of moist sugar, one ounce of carraway seeds, and one well beaten egg. Knead the dough well; put it into one large or two small baking-tins, set them to stand before the fire to rise, then bake in a well-heated oven. Time to bake, two hours. If made with dripping the cake costs about fivepence per pound. CHEESE FRITTERS.—Pound in a Dtortar, until quite smooth, two ounces of grated cheese, add a seasoning of grated ham, a tablespoonful of fine breadcrumbs, some mustard, and cayenne to taste. Work these together into a paste \\ith half an ounce of butter and the yoi. of an egg until thoroughly mixed. Form the paste into thin nat cakes the size of a crown piece. Make a batter as for pancakes; dip the cheese biscuits in it, and fry them a golden brown i'i boiling fat. Serve on a napkin very hot. Grated dry cheese should be sprinkled over the cakes. This is a very nice savoury. NORFOLK PUDDING.—Take three-quarters of a pound of nour, six ounces of chopped suet, a teaspoonful of ground ginger, and two ounces of raisins stoned and chopped. Add to these a heaped-.up teaspoonfnl of baking powder; then mix together four tablespoonfuls of golden syrup and one gill of milk. Stir this into the dry ingredienta and beat the mixture for a few minutes. Pour into a well-greased basin, cover v/ith a cloth, and boil for three hours. Turn out on to a hot dish and serve with hot treacle and sauce. FRENCH PuDDixo.—Take half a pound of nour, a quarter of a pound of suet, a small teacupful of moist sugar, a teaspoonful of baking powder, half a pound of golden syrup, also a little milk. See the suet is free from sk'n, and chop it nne mix it with nour, add sugar, baking powder, and golden syrup. Mix very thoroughly, add a little milk to form a thick batter. Butter a pudding basin. Pour the mixture into it, cover with a buttered paper, and steam for not lesa than three h\)urs. Turn out of basin and serve at once.

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IBRITISH NAVAL GUNNERY,I

SPIRIT OF THE NAVY.

FOOD PRICES MANIFESTO.1 ——<-——

,THE SIEGE OF PARIS.I

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OUR CHILDREN'S CORNER.

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