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2?arifttes auti literarq (Extracts.

GARDENING FOR THE WEEK.j

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ANOTHER ALARMING COLLIERY…

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ATTEMPT TO MURDER MR. JUSTICE…

IPOLLUTION OF RIVERS.

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! SOLDIERS' BANQUETS.I

I GUY FAWKES DAY.

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TURNIPS AND JAm.-According. to the correspondent of a trade journal, it is a mistake to suppose that fruit is absolutely necessary to the manufacture of preserves. He describes a visit to a large jam-producing factory, in which he found that the work was being bravely carried on without the aid of fruit at all. Jams of various kinds were being produced before his eyes-currant, plum, apricot, strawberry, raspberry, and gooseberry. Yet neither currant, plum, strawberry, apricot, raspberry, nor gooseberry was in the building. Turnips served the purposes of the fruit. The flavouring matter was extracted from coaltar, and the resemblance to rasp- berry and strawberry jam was further produced by mixing the boiling compound with small seeds of some cheap innocuous herb. A common form of sugar is used, and this is the only honest ingredient of the mess. These preserves are offered as made from "this season's fruit." Holloway's Pills.-There is nothing in the whole Materia Medica which can surpass these Medicaments for the certainty of their action in lumbago, sciatica, tic doloreux, and all flying or settled pains in the nerves, muscles and sinews. Diseases of this nature originate in bad blood and depraved humours, and until these are corrected, there can be no permanent cure. The ordinary remedies only afford temporary relief, and in the end the sufferer is as bad as ever Holloway's Ointment pene- trates the human system as salt penetrates meat, and the Pills greatly assist and accelerate its operation by clearing away all obstructions, and giving tone to the system generally. The prophylactic virtues of Holloway's remedies stand unrivalled. MEMORIALS FROM DOCKYARD WORKMEN.—A ques- tion about dockyard grievances was put by Captain Price, R.N., on Tuesday, 7th November. He asked whether Mr Campbell-Bannerman was aware that his predecessor in office, on the 28th June, 1880, while deprecating any discussion of dockyard grievances in the House of Commons, promised that the Board of Admiralty would themselves hear what the various classes of workmen had to say on the occasion of their annual visits to the dockyards whether the Admiralty had fulfilled, or intended to fulfil, that promise; whether, on that occasion, as on all subsequent visits, the Admiraltv neremntorilv refused to hear what. fhf representatives of the various classes had to say and was this polioy to be continued. The Secretary to the Admiralty thus answered:—" It is considered that there would be some inconvenience if it were accepted as a rule that the Board of Admiralty, on the occasion of their annual formal visit to the dockyards, should receive various classes of workmeJl. But no doubt, in some instances, a personal statement of facts is desi- rable in order that the Board may fully appreciate the case supmitted to them and there is no wish to ex- clude the men from this advantage. I have promised to the House that in the course of the recess I would, together with my hon. colleague, examine into the representations contained in the memorials which have been forwarded in the usual way through the Superintendents; and we will, if we find it necessary, take any opportunity in our power of ascertaining personally the views of the workmen. 6INGULAR DEATH FROM HYDROPHOBIA.— On Monday the Southwark coroner held an inquiry at Guy's. Hospital as to the death of Mary Ann Pearce, aged fourteen, who died under peculiar circumstances. The mother of deceased, residing at 22, Cottage- grove, Surbiton, said the deceased was very delicate in health. About two years ago she was bitten by a dog in the back of the hand. The animal belonged to a ladv in Surbiton. There were wonndu from the I dog's teeth on her hand, and a chemist to whom she went said he could not cauterise the wounds, as they were festering, owing to her blood being in a bad condition. After a long time the wounds healed up, and nothing particular happened until three weeks ago. Latterly the deceased had been staying with some friends at 7, York-terrace, East Dulwich. Margaret Pearce said the deceased came to stop with her about three months ago. Last Thursday she com- plained of being anwell, and remained in bed. When- ever the witness took water near to her she shrieked and seemed to go mad. During the night and the following day the deceased had nothing to drink and when the doctor who was called in offered her milk she raved and cried most piteously. By advice she was convoyed to the hospital, where, with the greatest difficulty, she told the doctor that she had been bitscn by a dog two years ago. Prior to being taken to the hospital the deceased heard a dog bark, and she at onco ran away, and howled in a most peculiar manner. Dr. J. C. Steele, medical superintendent of the hospi- tal, said he saw the deceased arrive at the hospital in a greatly convulsed condition and foaming at the month. He was told that she had been bitten by a dog, and he ordered her immediate admission. The girl expi- red almost immediately afterwards. The symptoms on her arrival were those of hydrophobia. At tho post-mortem there was no disease found likely to cause death, which was characteristic of cases of hy. drophobia. The jury returned a verdict in accor- dance with the medical evidence. Dr Steele said this was a remarkable case, death taking place two years after the injury. He had, however, known a death o occur five years after being bitten by a dog.

M A it K El S .

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'INFIRMARY COLLECTIONS.

I GREAT WESTERN RAILWAY TRAINS…

OUR LONDON CORRESPONDENT I

ROOSE SPECIAL PETTY SESSIONS.I

HAVERFORDWEST PETTY SESSIONS.…

IKICKED TO DEATH. I

FLOGGING IN BOARD SCHOOLS.

IDESTRUCTIVE FIRE AT MANCHESTER.I

MR. MUNDELLA ON ARBITRATION.I

I -THREATENING THE SULTAN.I