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THE FSD3LERS. I

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THE FSD3LERS. There is a time in the affairs or men when plain vvordi and straight talk are absolutely necessary to the national weal. That time is upon us. We are in danger of looking too much towards the goal without realising what we have to do be iore we get there. The hard path- way oi war is strewn with obstacles which cannot be ignored. We want to win the war—granted. So do the Germans! Let us see to the actual winning of it! Either the Government governs or it does not. Eitner we accept its decisions or we do not. Either we believe in it or we do not. Jellicoe has gone. Robertson has gone. Trench ard has gone. Rother- mere has gone. We have got Wemyss. We have got Wilson. We have got Sykes. We have got Weir. We went to Zeebrugge too! When it suits their purpose these fiddlers who cannot yet smell Rome burning will remark with that air of profound omniscience that is pos- sible only to the truly ignorant that one man does not and cannot count in a war of this character. "It is the system. But any stick will beat a Government, and any missile, however indisciiminatelyi singled out, can be aimed at the! bead of the Prime Minister. Mr. Lloyd George sharply pulls up the fantastic wanderings of Lord Hugh Cecil's imagination—not en- tirely non-Celtic in its own origin! —nails him down with facts, com- pletely and successfully refutes the e-harge of amateur strategy hurled at the War Cabinet; and the "Daily News" --of all people!—calmly, coolly, with accustomed imparti- ality ealls it "stage thunder!" Meanwhile, there is the ominous thunder of the German guns on the blood-bespattered stage of Flan- ders! The Cabinet must have the choice of its experts, else the prose- cution of the war become-s a farce from the technical standpoint and a catastrophe to the country. It is clear, lamentably clear, that too many people can still be numbered among those who view the war as a. side issue. It is passing strange that the self-appointed Armageddon super- visee—Messrs. Pringle, Gardner, Lord Hugh Cecil, and others of similar genius—are the obstruction- ists of old. There is no great neces- sity to bring in the past—for the present is too momentous. But we remember—end when we dwell on party politics for brief retrospec- tive moments the echoes of their raucous cries s?e still audible— Lord Hugh Cecil's oontribution to ulio essential sanity of things when Welsh Disestablishment, for example, was before the HOUS8 t Verily, human nature changeth not! He and his coterie were sur- prised on Moaoay night t.) firld the sensitive. We warrant that were Job of old the Prime Minister to-day there would be lively scenes in Parliament! It is a tribute to the Premier that he is no worse than "sensitive." No ship can hope to survive if the crew give their own orders during a great storm. No nation can weather a trial like this one if the man at the wheel and the offi- cers he elects to guide the destinies of the land are" to be made targets for vulgar abuse and empty headed vituperation when the ideals of Right and Justice and Freedom and Liberty are still in peril from the assaults of the enemy.

LABOUR CHAIRMAN. I

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