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-.-I Germans' Fierce Effort…

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I Germans' Fierce Effort to Gain a Victory. British Troops Stand Firm. I Renter's Paris message received to-day (Thursday) gays:— The news from Flanders is very good. The resumption of hostilities was Dot un-j expected in view of the improvement in ihe weather, aud yesterday's com- muniquos proved that: the Allies have ikrw definitely fx-tthliahpd their superi- ority. The much talked of German movement ended in disaster to their arms, and no sweeping victory awaited the Kaiser's birthday. It is certain that the fighting m Belgium will very shortly lio' ome much more intense. On lietli fronts considerable hodies of troops j are ia movement. The Allies are iii' touch with everything tlii)t is going on behind tho German lines in Belgium. Un Monday and. Tuosd&y largo droves I of Belgian refugees have been pourio? out by train loads. The trains follow/ one another in quick succession, and at tha stations charitable agencies are actively attending to the need6 of the ] unfortunate emigrants, who are &lmc?t j completely without resourCéB. j Unfavourable Weather. Weather of the most unfavourable kind prevails over the Hazebrouck and Anr.entieros region. Heavy snow hClj; been followed by rain, and the -oil alternately soaked and frozen, is in a deplorable state, but the British keep up (heir artillery advantage. It is uu- deniable that the Britisb artillery has for some time shown a superiority of skill and accuracy of fire that has greatly astonished the Germans. Several enemy aviators are reported to Vhave shown themselves towards Dunkirk. They were unable to go on, however, be- cause of the presence of the French air- men, who are constantly on the watch, circling continuously over the town. Short Lived Advantage. I There has been heavy fighting between Bethune and La Bassee since Monday last. The casualties have been heavy on both sides. Ac announced in the official communique published yesterday, the Germans delivered an assault in force on Monday on our advance tranchcs at Givcnchy. Although greatly outnum- bered, our troops offered a stout resist- ance; hut after u prolonged and furious hght, in the course of which the enemy l returned five times to the charge, we were obliged to abandon the position. The enemy's success was short lived. Having taken this advanced position they I made ii further advance on Tuesday with the object of pressing the advan- l tage already gained. In the meantime, however, fresh troops had been hurried forward. They not only stopped the Ger- man advance, hut routed the enemy with great loss, and reoccupicd the trenches at Givenchy which had been lost on the previous day. Fighting is still jiiroceeding, not only at La Basses, but at other important points along the northern battle line. In Massed Formation. I The attack on Bethune was carried out by the Germans in massed forma- tion, which they have discarded since the battle of Flanders. This method of attack was no more successful on this j occasion than in the earlier battles of i the war. The advancing column came under a devastating <ire, and was wiped II out ?or. the pUrpGèG8 of attack. V ? is dated that the total number cf German prisoners taken up to last night was about 206. I At Ypres. Paris, Wednesday.—Soldiers who have arrived here to-day from Ypres give some] details of the Germans' attack the day before yesterday near Ypres. The Germans, they relate, hurled themselves in dense masses on the! allies' lines, hoping to pierce them, but machine guns tore frightful gaps in their ranks, literally mowing down the ad-, vancing :»fan try. When rainforcement;G 1 arrived they weje roceived by such fierce artillery fire that they had to retreat: without having been able to support the j ul txc.k, leaving many dead on the held. The losses of the allies were in6ig-Difi cant. Those of the Germans were very j heavy.—Preen Association. ) importance of British Success. The importance cf the British success near La Bassee on Tuesday is becoming more apparent. The German attack when I it began was accompanied by great activity along the whole of the front. While the Belgians were advancing in the neighbourhood oi x'ersyoe, a battered vil- lage lying halfway between Nieuport and Dixinude, the enemy made a further effort against Ypres. After bombarding the .French positions to tb: oast of the town they launched an attack in force,' but before the men could get under way the French artillery poured their ebell upon them and prevented the brigade which had been ordered to attack from, coming into line. The enemy's losses are esti- mated at about 1,560 killed and wounded. It was only along the La Bassee front that the German attack was able to develop. The progress of the Germans from their strongly fortified position at La Bassee is barred by the British troops liolding a strong trench line. Time after time they have endeavoured to force our line here, but so far the only success, and that a temporary one, to their credit was the affair on December 20, when the Indians captured trenches after a brilliant action, but were forced to retire by a furious rounter-attack. Times."

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