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. SWANSEA'S NEW CHAMBER OF…

MRS. KATE FREEMAN.

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,-BACK FROM CHINA.I

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BACK FROM CHINA. Swansea Architect Comes Back to Enlist. It does not require much miaginauoii to conceive how deeply interesting a journey at the present time must be irom lihina across Siberia and Russia to Pe-,iv- grad. thence through Jt inland and Sweaen and Norway to England. This wonderful journey has just been accomplished by Mr. Carey Edmunds, Cradock-street, Swansea, who arriveu home on Tuesday. The enthusiasm of the English people and those belonging to the countries of the Allies resident in China over the war is so tremenaous tliai. everybody who can is coming home to en, iist. Tnat is the object ot iar. jKununa fc primature return, and he has been ac- cepted as a surveyor in the Royal En- gineers. Mr. Edmunds who is the son of the Rev. E. E. Edmunds, ex-pastor of Bethesda and secretary of the Baptist Union for Wales and Monmouth, and only 22 years of age, went out from Swansea to China a year ago last November to follow his profession ar an architect. He settled in Shanturg, North China, in the same province as Tsing-tan, which was captured by the Jap- anese from the Germans. He intended his sojourn in the Far East to last two years, but curtailed it for the reason stated. He hopes to return to China after the war. While in China Mr. Edmunds wae greatly interested in studying the life and customs of the natives, and he also found much which specially appealed to him from a professional point of view. The Chinese, it should be noticed, have no architects of their own and hence the-A is much 6oope for professionals from the west. In an interview with our representative to-day, Mr. Edmunds said that just after the outbreak of the war the G-ermajis cap- tured the native Chinese papers and used them to circulate false news of the hap- penings in Europe. We received news in the early days of the war from these sources that Portsmouth had been cap- tured and that Edinburgh was being bom- barded and later we heard that all the British people in India had been massa- cred. These, of course, were all German lies." The Chinese believed them because they received no other reports. But thp I English Con suI at. Shantung received Reuter's telegrams, and we shared tho cost with him and spread them abroad as much as possible." Nearly every young man is leaving; China to oome home and enlist," Mr. Edmunds continued. The enthusiasm out there is tremendous I came home with two other Englishmen—one a doctor un- der the Chinese Government, who threw up a good position to enlist and the other a skin merchant. The journey took four weeks and six days instead of little over a fortnight/' Narrating in brief his ex- periences on the journey, Mr. Edmunds said they came through Siberia to Petro- grad. The three of them travelled as British officers and the Russian Govern- ment was very good to them, giving them a free passage right across the whole of Russia to the capital, first class coupe or carriage or the Trans-Siberian Railway was placed at their disposal. From Petrograd, Mr. Edmunds and his com- panions travelled by the train right to north of Finland- It was frightfully cold here, colder even than Siberia. They then had a sleigh rid.e of four hours from Tornea to Karungi, the terminus of the Swedish railways. By rail they tra- velled through Sweden to Stockholm, thence across to Christiania the capital of thence acros to Christian, the capital of Norway, from Christiania to Bergen, and from Bergen across the North Sea to New- castle. The ordinary overland route from China lies through Brussels and Calais, but owing to the war this way home was impossible. "We saw Russia at a most interesting time," said Mr. Edmunds, When cross- ing one of the famous bridges in Russia we had a soldier with fixed oayonet standing by the door of our compartment, and the same at every compartment. We were held up a lot in Siberia to let Aus- trian prisoners pass. There were thou- sands of them and they were being taken to a place called Yakutsk. Frequently we were also delayed through military trains .At Omsk a great Siberian Cossack centre, we saw as far as eye could reach soldiers going through training in horse- manship. We landed in Petrograd on the Russian Christmas Day, and it was very interesting. All the churches and cathe- drals were packed with people to the door praying for the success of their army." One thing amused Mr. Edmunds, this was to see Cossack Officers, who by their faces were evidently devoties of Bacchus, drinking lemonade owing to the prohibi- tion of Vodka.

I-I AN AMERICAN VETERAN.

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IEISTEDDFODAU. j

I PONTARDAWE RURAL COUNCIL.…

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ITHE UNWANTED GOAT. I

I CAPTURED WELSHMEN IN IGERMANY.,

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