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- - - _ -ENEMY REPULSED WITHj…

PUSHING ENEMY BACK. I

OFFICIAL COMMUNIQUES. j -…

I CHASEO TO HELIGOLAND. I

KING AWARDS V.C. TO LIEUT.…

WHY MENIN WAS NOT OCCUPIED.

THE CHILIAN ACTION. I

AUSTRIAN SAILORS DEFEATED.I

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INTERESTING LETTER FROM THE…

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 INTERESTING LETTER FROM THE I FRONT. P.C. Pringle, a member of the Port Talbot Police Force, serving with the 1St Grenadiers 7th Division in France, writing to a fellow officer at Port Talbot saylS: Thank you very much for the a y 6 I parcel and long letter. It was like re- ceiving a X5 note when I got them in the trenches. If you notice I am not writing on the paper you sent me as someone pinched it, and left mo the envelopes. They'll have anything if you don't watch them. The cigarettes came in just nicely, and I must thank you all once again. At present everything is going down alright. The weather though is some- thing awful, and it keeps being wet and cold, so you can guess what it must be liko when we are in the trenches. It is water everywhere, and it takes good boots to 'nand in it. We have had enow and about a week of hard frost. I have been fighting with the battalion in three different places, and this place has been! the easiest up till now. The German trenches are not very far. I Fusilade of Tins. They have been having games with 1 us lately. Several times they have thrown tins filled with mud at our trenches. On fine nights they sing and shout and play mouth organs. When they hear our Maxim go off they hoot I and shout. What takes the bun, they even wave shovels when our chaps make a miss and shout, "Yoii can't hit me I" Some of them are daring. As a rule the I beggars fire like Maxims at night, but in: the morning you can ju?t hear a few ? rounds fired. I wouldn't mind if they I' keep as quiet as they have been lately. Just at present things are very much easier for us, as the weather is so bad. We go into billets ever so often. We make up for lost time with plenty of milk, bread and butter, and a good sleep. I expect there are a few going now. Plenty of men to take OUT places. The iihondda boys must be hot stuff, going up tho road with mouth organs. Best j wishes to the boys in the station." H We have had a taste of pudding from Queen Mary*, and it was alright, but I'd i sooner have a taete of my wife's pud- ding," said Pte. Joifn Cullen, of the let! Somersets, at present with the Expedi- tionary Force at the front, in a letter which has been received by his wife, Mrs. j Carrie Cullen. j He save: You say in your letter that you hope we are getting a rest from the firing line. The rest we get is this. III the trenches for a week, 'hen out for two days rest. The trcnches are, up to our waist in water, and as for mud and slush, there is no end of it. Then the rest: we come out of the firing line about half a milo or a mile. We did once have a rest in a town, but that is stopped. You also asked me in your letter how long it j ie going to last. Well I must say it is going to laet a long time, the same as I I said in my first letter, and I don't think T will be far wrong wishing it was finished to-morrow, becaua~: I'm about I fed up with it. It would be different if it vras fine weather. "Thero are a good many poor fellows laid out about 20 or 30 yards in front of our trenches now, whom we can't get in. 1 because the Germans are only about 80 or 90 yards from us. Wo managed to fetch one poor fellow in the other night. He had been cut there about, six weeks. We searched hie pockets and we found a letter from his wife, who "was glad to think he was all right, and still living. I So you can see the end of one. I should not like to end like that if it is to be. I should at least like to be found just after: then they could give you the news, but I hope, and trust in God. that I shall b' n??u-?d for yen an? the chi.Idr?n. ?though I baye bcea very luckv, thmk 'rod. We have had a bit of pudding from Queen Mary. It was all right, but I'd sooner have a bit of yours or a bit of cake." I Speaking upon the subject of warm clothing, Pte. Cullen save that this was 'I really wanted, as they did not often have a change. "In the first place," he 6ay«, Edward asked me if I wauted a rig out of woolen clothing. I didn't hove Any time then to have them, as we were chasing the Germans for miles, and they were too much to carry, and there was no time to change. The men that are homo are very lucky to be out of this terrible war for a month or so. although this is the quietest we have been in since we have been out here. There has not been much fighting, only sniping and a few shells coming over this last few we?kp. The worst day ever I spent was on my birthday. It rained that day more than ever it did. We were in the trench like drowned ra t s when one of my mates said: There's an awful day." That put me in mind of something. Then I it came to me. I asked the date, and one said the 11th. "Oh," I said. "No wonder it's raining, it's my birthltay." They all called me an unlucky fellow. I said: "II don't know, I reckon I'm one of the lucky ones to be where I am to-day."

jSWANSEA WAR PRIZES.

| PONTARDULAIS HERO'S WELCOME.

jPONTARDULAIS BOY SHOT.

MR. MASTERMAN'S REPLY.…

! COUNCIL7S DILEMMA. I !-I

WAR CAUSES FAILURE. I

- _- I NEATH WORKERS HELP…

WALES AND THE WAR

SEASONABLE GIFT.

SWANSEA MEMBER AND RED CROSS

- -.- _- - - -DEATH OF A SWANSEA…

THE TINPLATE EMBARGO.