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- - - _ -ENEMY REPULSED WITHj…

PUSHING ENEMY BACK. I

OFFICIAL COMMUNIQUES. j -…

I CHASEO TO HELIGOLAND. I

KING AWARDS V.C. TO LIEUT.…

WHY MENIN WAS NOT OCCUPIED.

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WHY MENIN WAS NOT OCCUPIED. Though Sir John French was db;- 0 pointed because Sir Henry Rawiir- Son felt himsslf unable to carry cut his orders for the 7th Division to seize and occupy the important strategical point of Menin on October 13th, the Field-Marsha! none the less previously referred to the services of the Division, when holding or: to the Ypres position before ho could reinforce it with the First Corps in terms of very high :i praise. If we want any confirmation jj of these words, the 7th Division can point to the feet that when it was withdrawn from the fighting line to rc- fit on November 21st it was found that) in the infantry alone out of 400 officers who set out from England six weeks previously only 1!1 were left, and out of 12,DCa men only 2,335. Forty-four ofifcers alive out of 400: The foregoing: is an extract from an article by f Scrutator," in Truth," telling the 1: tcry of the 7th Division. The article goes on: Although wo have never been told so officially, it is generally 111ldentood tbaf the 7th Division and 3rd Cavalry Division were sen I to Flanders to act as the advance guard of Sir John French's Army which was in process of being transported to the northern extremity of the Allies" left flank, in order to carry out the Field- Marshal's plan of invading Belgimll and bringin.g relief to Antwerp. When Sir John French heard of the surrender of Antwerp he directed Sir Henry Rawlinson to give a hand to the Belgian g-arrison, whn were escaping through Bruges and Ostend, and then withdraw the 7th Division to a position eaSt- of Ypres extending from Zandvoorde to Zonnebeke, the 3rd Cavalry Division prolonging the line northwards to Lange-j marck. This was done on October 16th. and 11Gre the 7th Division had to remain tilli the 21st, holding some six miles erf front i against the attacks of a force which must: have been at least four times its strength. 1 An Order Unfulfilled. It was as much as the division could do to hold the position, and when the Field- Marshal ordered Sir Henry Rawlinson to seize Afenin the General judged it better to hold the order in abeyance owing to the battalions being so weakened by losses as to be unfit to take the offensive I outside the defensive position they were guarding. As a matter of fact, Menin was not at that time in occupation of the enemy, and it ie reasonable to suppose that Sir 1 John French was justified in giving the l order he did, and that Sir Henry Rawl- 1 inson was wrong in not carrying it out;; but, however that may be. it is quite certain that if the 7th Division had been allowed to make the effort officers and men would have responded to the call with the, same spirit which marked all their 6ulwoquent conduct when standing with their backs to the wall at Ypres. A Difficult Situation. I  A SNDOMINAW general wno rezxmc-6 for whatever reason to carry out the orders of his superior always incurs a hoavy responsibiHty. but this should not deter him from declining to obey if be has acquired information not in posseefdon of his superior when ho issued his instruc- tk>r>s. Judging from the carefully chosen words of Sir John French in his de- spatch, there seems to have been some conflict of opinion between himself and his subordinate in regard to this point, for lie atcd that 'he wae well as aware as Sir Henry Rawlinson of the approach- ing presence of large bodies of the enemy's troops from the east and north- east, and had taken this into considera- tion whe* ho ordered the 7th Division to occupy Mervi. The Field-Marshal knew that the divi- sion had been somewhat weak,-nca by continuous marching and fighting eince its landing in Belgium, but having re- gard to the vital importance of the ser- H:e ordered he did not think that thp duty demanded was more than could be undertaken. What we have to bear in mind is that Sir Henry Rawlion acted as he judged for the best, and no officer in a position I r-f responsibility can do more than this. If he jnade a mistake-and this must re- main a matter of opinion-It was nothing more than an error of judgment commit- ted on the spur of the moment, and no blame can be fastened on him for this. for did not Napoleon tell us that he is the bwt genera? who makes the fewest mistakes ?

THE CHILIAN ACTION. I

AUSTRIAN SAILORS DEFEATED.I

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jSWANSEA WAR PRIZES.

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jPONTARDULAIS BOY SHOT.

MR. MASTERMAN'S REPLY.…

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THE TINPLATE EMBARGO.