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FARMERS AT LOGGER-1 HEADS

I BOY SCOUT HONOURED.I

A CWMGORSE BOY AT THE FRONT.

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A CWMGORSE BOY AT THE FRONT. The Rev. E. Davies, Cwmgorse, Gwaun- caegurwen, has received the following in- teresting letter from Sapper W. J. Stone, now at the front. "It gives me great pleasure to write, a few lines to you. I am in the best of health and going on splendidly. 1 am very pleased to tell you that everything is quite satisfactory here, and although 1, j with the brigade, have been in a few tight corners, we have up to the pre&ent puiied through all right. At the time of writing things are generally quiet in this part of the line, but as the saying goes. 'there is always a lull before the storm: We are ready when the storm comes. Yes, and 1 think the Germans know we are ready too, for I assure you they are very wary in their procedure, in their manner of fight- ing, i.e., in trenches. As an engineer my work entails being in or about the firing line continually, so you, may guess wo! get into Borne 'hot' spots. I have now iieen in the trenches since November 5th (various trenches, of course). First with Cameronians (Scottish Rifles), and now with the Royal Welsh Fusiliers. The other regiments composing the brigade are the Middlesex Regiment and the Ar- gyle and Sutherland Highlanders. No doubt you will have read Sir John French's last dispatch in the papers dated (November 28tli. Y o a will have seen there the good work this brigade has been doing in this terrible war. I say terrible for when seen as we see it, no other word will fit. I am at present on the outskirts of a very large city, which, in time of, peace must be a beautiful place, but now practically nothing but a heap of ruins, and deserted. It is really heartrending to see the homeless refugees, thp ruined homes—beeautiful homes—which have been ransacked and looted by Germans b £ -1 fore their evacuation. But their day of reckoning will come, for we shall surely round them lip One often thinks what, would happen ijf the Germans reached our 1 own country. If it had been our own women and children who had suffered as these poor Belgians and French have. When I think 01 my own wife and child- ren, and my friends, I thank God I am here to do mv little bit to uphold the honour of my Country and its people. But we want more men. it is hard work hold- ing such a long line and against such a formidable and ruthless foe, night and day in the trenches, especially now the winter is upon up. It is men we want to J put the finishing touch to this. Our boys j are all in good spirits, and will carry on to the last of them, but we are always fighting against odds, and it is more men we want. "You were interested, I remember, in the Civic Guard. Well, I hope things have gone well with them, but it would be ten times better for the country and us if the young men were out here. It is here they are needed to stop the enemy from ever invading our shores. "WTe were very pleased to hear this morning of the sinking of the three Ger- man cruisers off the coast of Chili. Wre arc always on the look out for such news. I hope the whole affair will soon be over, always providing, of course, that we como off victorious. 'I hope also the Civic Guard, and all interested, will be suc- cessfu l in raising a corps equal to the occasion should there be an invasion. But as I said before all the young men should enlist and come to meet them (or drive I them) rather than wait for their coming to wreck our homes and kill our women and children."

BEN. EVANS AND CO.'S CHRISTMASI…

LLANDILO PRIZE DAY.

SWANSEA MOTHERS.

MESSRS. EDWARDS' CHRISTMAS…

COM I NG HOME FOR CHRISTMAS.

MESSRS. BEVAN AND CO., LTD.

THREW HERSELF DOWNSTAIRS.

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r MINING MATTERS.

! CAPTAIN FOURIER SHOT.

I EFFECT OF WAR.

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I ALLEGED THEFT AT SWANSEA.

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LLANDILO PRIZE DAY.