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RUM UNDER BED. 1 I

..-.-: I UNSPEAKABLE TURK.…

-_._..-I LLANDYSSUL MAN WOUNDED…

INJURED SWANSEA -MAN -RECEIVESit,…

0 0 "':';' ð " "O?T OF OMS?."…

LLANSTEPHAN SA -"R KEEPSI…

! DEFENCELESS TCWJS. ! e

PRESENTATION TO SWANSEA I…

POPULAR SCHOOLMASTER. I

NEW WELSH TENOR. I

I NAVIGATION.

_.. - - - -REGISTRAR'S WARNING…

- - - - FRED BATEMAN DEAD.

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THE INVASION OF BRITAIN.

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THE INVASION OF BRITAIN. Swansea Locturer Recalls Past Efforts. c the J/ublio Library, Swansea, recently, Mr. i-j. C. Hanson, student at Seivvyn College, and a member of the Cambridge tniversity Officers Training Corps, delivered a most interesting and informing Jecturo on H lnyasions of Britain." Mr. II. A. Chapman presided. The iirst invasion of which there is any clear record, said Mr. Hanson, was that of tho Iio ma ns under Julius Ctesar, which left its mark upon these isltiidf in the (feudal System, the germs of representa- tive government, municipal self govern- ment, and the rudiments of Roman law. The various invasions of the Saxons and Lanes were then deait with, the lecturer remarking that the Celt and Roman under these invasions gave May to the Englishman, and Britain became England. The Norman Conquest of 1,06(;, tho k-et great invasion of England, brought this country into the full stream of European poiitics, and the Norman Duke becoming the English King, determined English policy for many centuries. Various attempts at 'invasion were made during the reign of Henry III., during the 100 years' war with France, and during the wars of the Roses, but were of no great importance In Elizabeth's reign Eng- land saw the attempt by the Spaniard, through the Arma.da-the preparation of many years—to invade and conquer the countrt; an attempt defeated by the! descendants of the sea kings who made England their home—Drake, Frobisher, Hawkins, Eeleigh, name? that will never be lost sight of in the history of maritime adventure—and to whoso galiunt efforts the thundercloud that had, gathered against England for close on 40 years hung imminent for a week, broke, and passed away," leaving Britain Mistress of the Seas," a title she still holds, and will hold for many years to come if iiritons. but do their duty at this present time. The 19th century saw the French hordes under Napoleon gathered at Boulogne, waiting a favourable opportunity to in- vade Britain. England between 1803 and 18U5 was in a very excitcd condition, and the country was arming to, oppose a danger finally -di-sol-eO and shattered by Nelson at Trafalgar. These days saw Swansea doing its part, and four field guns were purchased by public subscription and mounted in suitable positions. In addition some 4,700 volunteers were raised, of whom 2,519 were accepted and embodied. The following lines taken from a hymn eung in the Parish Church of St. Mary on Sunday morning, December 4th, 1803, i shows the spirit of the time, and might: be applied to the period before the pre- sent wa.r:- The foe it seems a vow has made, That Briton shortly he'll invade. We humbly thank him for the mention. However, granting thi3 a puff, The things was said, and that's enough, Britons with Britons late had wranglings, But hush'd are now these potty j anglings. So have I heard when silly strife Has started up twixt man and wife, If neighbours enter midst the pother And meddle with one or other, I The rage that twixt the couple burn'd, Is straight upon the intruder turned. The lecturer then dealt with the Fish- ■ guard invasion of 1797, when 1400 French- men were landed at Carreg Gwagted and took up a strong position overlooking Fishguard. The final surrender of the French troops is said to be due to the part taken by the women of Pembrokeshire, who, led by Jemina Nicholas, marched round a hill aud caused the French to mistake them for a regiment of regulars, because of the red shawls and high hats then worn. In conclusion, Mr. Hanson then dealt with the present crisis, and the possi- bility of a German invasion of this country, saying that the fall of Antwerp was considered by the Germane to bring London visibly near, and to be the first step to conquering the hated English, and the lecturer -aiil it was almost certain that Germany would make one desperate attempt to succeed where Napoleon failed, and to avenge herself ou the country which has shattered her hopes and ruined her. It is for us to see that she does not have the opportunity, and the one and only way in which England can do this is by fuiiy realising her responsibilities, and the dangers over confidence, and carrying out to the very minutest detail the last and ever famous Trafalgar signal, Eng- land expects that every man will do bis duty." To this signal her sons faithfully responded, acd if the same is done to-day, she will again emerge victorious from this, the greatest war which has ever occurred in the history of the world. She ,,e d w *tb that grand will emerge still possessed with that grand old title Mistress of the Seas," ensuring more than, ever before the safety of the country from any hostile invasion.

A SUITE OF FURNITURE. I

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jCLERKS AND RECRUITING. ,…

-I DEATH OF A LLANELLY SOLICITOR.…

BOARD OF TRADE AND A SWANSEAI…

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