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A horse «t Singleton has fore?et shaped like tHo"e c? j, cow.. A-oiia^ce lor tHe pen?v  11.kf, tiiu6e co\N,. ior tiie ljeiii;v ga?il illaii. The saying, "A coof- thousand, had a new sigin^^udice whei, ^nc saw [Üe red War Loan Liie ,ci-Lt,ii, wind. Engine-driver:- had a- trying time during "windy —their upper part,, exposeu to the cutting hkist, ijrtcnr legs comfortably j by the Jre, Tlii-rty acorns were foulid in the crop of a w'j?d p;g?-u? ku;ed ne<ti.' a??i?ea.. iiome- thiug; like a "vood" < pigeon ilL kil the. a?'rrc; had growu up. The, ir,t £ nsc> cold has the ponds in the. Carmarthen district, and skaters aie having fine spoil. • the most favoured places are L^'ahain Pout and Bishop's Pond in Abergwiii. There .is to be no" '.»*hcial ce-nsorship oi cinema films but jocfa anthoriTies are to be invited to use tie Lie Cinema- tograph Act of 190$, to. remedy any abuse; that may, exist. <3> Having visited the battle area in order to colleet. suitable material., Mr. Christo- pher Williams is 1 engaged in commit- ting to canvas fn of the mem- ora.ble British Mametz Wood, in which Wc'&h trqGpstok such a prominent t.-eqcps ?qok suc h a proniiiieiit, li The blaze ommol1, which, by prompt measures, was prevented from spreading to ricks etc., was, like the one at Melyn, the 'work of mischievous lads. Can't these boys lkiih spare time on their hands be put to some sort of war work? The Welsh- team are very keen upon the match against- the New Ztalanders at Swan- 80.1 on Saturday, and all the men make no secret.of their detcuminutic.n to win. A very strong fifteen will-be fielded by the home- sters and th, game should prove even a ifner struggle •for supremacy than the last game on Boxing Day; <1'>-<"><> Sir Eiwird H'olden, Bart., whose mas- terly specch at the ;liondon Citvmd Mid- land Bank shareholders' meeting has gained so much publicity, is the son of the late Sir Isaac Holds*}, a Yorkshire memi- | facttsring TOagn^t^* ..wvefttbr. million- of the lucifer matrh. He made during his lifetime a little -irese.it to his four chil- dren of ?250,000 <'ac? dreii o?l?.f,250,000 In a lighting fa.se at Swansea Police Court on Monday, in which a lady was ( summoned, for .insufficiently obscuring the lights in her fhop, Special Sergeant Sandry said that when he called her attention to them ^ie replied,. My-'Gosh I the Germans :1ren.t.nming here, are th>è.y?" rrhe ser- geant told her that was a very debatable 1 point. The magistrates did not debate very lorg in fixing the fine anyhow.  00<Xx:>0 ) Dapper and brisk Mr. E. P. Joneg would ? pass very well for forty-five in the dusk with the light behind bini, but he is more than that (writes "Old Swansea Boy.") For the newly elected president of the Swansea Chamber of Commerce was on the com- mittee of the Swansea Cricket and Football Club when thewritet was wont to go down to-the 'nets' at St. Helen's for practice, and that was—well, never mind how many years ago. ,4 .$. In a preface he has written to a new book called War Songs General Sir Ian Ham- ilton makes the following, interesting refer- ence to the soldiers of Wales Welsh soldiers are extremely musxul. There is a. tendency in the Welsh military music to fall, metaphcricaily .-peaking, into the minor key. and to dwell rather on the pathos of war than en its glorias. The Scotch are in sympathy with Welsh pathos, but. they seem more susceptible to the glamtfur of war. .$.t. A gentleman- strange to the town, and bound for the Mumbles, rounded Ra!land-street corner hud saw that the train was staii ling with engine attached. Anticipating an early start, he climbed aloft, drew out a. paper, and commenced L to rea d. After a good fifteen minutes' reading he became anxious, as no move was being made (nor likely to be). He then discover- ed that the engine had disappeared alto- gether into the shed for fresh ( ammunition. The would-he loft v look of unconcern with which he climbed down aga,in was very amusing.—("Ma^k Once.") Amongst the lads in khaki on leave at Fforestfach is Cadet "lfob" Andrews, the youngest son 01 Mr. and Mrs. Tom Andrews, school attendance officer. "Bob" has made ocd since joining the R.W.F., and bids! fair to follow in the footsteps of his bro- ther. Capt. Gb-ndwr Andrews, R.W.F., who is again on duty after Ms recent gas pOispn-1 ing. Another brother, John, has been in France for upwards of two years with the Army Transport Corps, and yet another bro- j ther, David Charles Andrews, has also made rapid progress since joining the Colours. A fine family regord. "Pc?t. Bn.g Reader" ?-rit??:—" I noMee th?t the acorn is generaIlyphnted in the P?t. B?; he;1 the oak follows. T?ke the: to]low-:Kg/ inst-'iites :—The inhabitants (.f Jersey Maritu:' ?'F years gi'jmbied and groused for ?t school iol. the scores of youngsters that run about wild there, but- nothing .was dene. Then a 'Post Bag' ap- peared then a general meetingnext a school. man'a water ser- vice went wrong at the Uplands: 'Post Bag; new waiter service. Then the serious food problem was called attention to, -Ind people began tp cultivate so-called scrap- hea.p back gardens with good results^ Now We have allotments galore, and good results are aiiticipatel." So that's all right. "What a beastly nuisance these fellows .are mavching across oui- links and spoiling our golf wis, the remark made by a. ge.ntV man (') engaged in the sport. as the Mumbles j V.T.C. recently crossed the LangJand Bav Golf Links on company drill. He was; promptly, ajid sharply tak-e-n to task by "the j fwagsant-major who told him that if he was I doing his duty be would be-in France. It. ) is scarcely credible (writes a correspon- dent),that. Nucti a, remark could be made in these days, and the members of th? V.T.C., amongst whom are several very iproaiiintnt j local golfers, were highly inewised. If thl .player in question had 4ivited the .men to •.partake of^a -farming cup of something' it, ^vould have h?\Hi ifiifimtely more to his-credit. Le^s beer, more sugar.: have a peppermint: drop? "> f A I.u? number of ?tArMngs were s,in | the C plands (Swansea) district this (Mon- 1! day) morning. Where ai'c th? best pictures? was of httle Gonscy uebce on Saturday afternoon. Which ¡, the warmest cinema wa? all thai, "Do thL" 'ole tram go to Briton Ferry?" mattered. &o u,) Br i t(-;l,. Feri- was the startling query put to the con- ductress of a Brympil car about to start from Wind-street. Poo On° War Loan lo(aUv is th? gold that :s finding its way ? inW the_ The proverbial stocking I legs 8J:E:¡ bieing emptied. le-gs. a4,o b#trg -<<i>'< It WjSvS the Swanse- JUan who spoke most j strongfy in favour of Free Trade after the who siidd-lilv sat on the floor. His ,trian "bent wood chair hed collapsed, <i> < £ >-=?> <jxS>^S-- True to their traditional character, said Mr. A. K. Drummond in his Free Library j lecture, the Scotch objection to potatoes when first introduced into the country was that they were not mentioned in the Bible, Mr. John HodZ" as a politician has | already won .golden opinions from the busi- ness community, and particularly from i.he iroii and steel trades," with which he has been so aiid (--oul Trades Review "} In the United Suites the expert demand for tmplates is enormously heavy. One in- quiry j3 said to be for upward of 2,000,000 boices. for delivery ever the remaindornf this year, but nearly all the leading mills reused to quote on it, as they are sold so far ahead. <> <>«<.><i ,far Ninatetn, single, and passed for general service!" exclaimed the tribunal chaira.n. looking at the applicant's paper. Why are you not in the Army?" "What! with" this —— war on! retorted the young man re- proachfully. Every-phafie.pf Swansea life is out to assist the local funds and on Thursday and Satur- day next. there will be a'fishing competition on the Swansea, West Pier for the benefit of the Daily Pt n War Prisoners' Fund, so "chip" "hi for a shilling ticket. The east vwind has certainly vested it- self up to its evil reputation, for there was never such a feeling among Swansea docks- men and dockers to clear up and get away out of it as prevailed midday on Saturday la-st. j Ia.st.. i. Passengers-on the Morriston section of the. J Swaaisea tramway service will miys two | familiar figures, for death has removed Mr. Henry Taylor and Mr. Louis Trew from their journeys to and -from Messrs. Vivian and Son's-Hacfd officer i' "?> A. correspondent seilds Us the foilowthg1 j to try and warni t- up — "A column of soldiers was marching Ht three irnles an I hour, and an ofifcer, wan Ttj^rching to ánil fro at the rate of six miles an hour. What tune was the band playing?" I & ?>"?- x ><.  When you rgad American peace comments i and even Notes' from- high places, r> member that the great American peopiels, have no national flower nOr national song, Unless you except: — I did not raise my son to be a soldier, To kill some other mother' s darling boy. (This from a oprr«.«-pondent.) •SxJ»<Sx £ -< & -« S "I have a very pleasant surprise for you, boys," remarked Commodore Hodgens to the Swansea Naval Brigade 011 Saturday afternoon. Next Wednesday a very kind j Swansea lady is going to present, the I hrigade,vith a beautiful silk Union Jack." (Cheers.) New" Boy (whispering to hi., I | pal): What's a Jack Union?" Don't know," answered his chum "but it isn't I a- Workhouse flag, anyway V' Correct. > "We went over. but we didn't do much good for we found all the German trenches empiy. On the way back they sprang a mine on \1;)\, but I was on the other sido and got off with two broken fingers and a shoulder put out, that's all." These are the mild words of a brave Australian, who is going back, to France as soon as he has seen some of' his relations at Burry Port. seelt some of? Ws at Burry Port. ■ When the wind is from the north-east," said a. Port Temiant ifsherman to a- "Post" map, the sea is not so rough over the side of this harbour, so I get a long line with several hooks on it and take it down to low water these spring tides and cast it out, and secure it well, and then take it up again at next low ebb. I generally get a conger eel or two. I used to do it for pleasure, but, now food is 80 dear it's a necessity. And, ? conger's rather tasty -?-?X?X?-?x?- When the Llygad Llwchwr Water Works •j was in course of construction and the na vvie- were busy laying down tho mains, one of them was reproached by the foreman. He looked up and toid him to go to a certain sultry abode. The foreman instructed the pay-clerk that lie. was not to .pay this par- ticular navvy until he made an apology. The navvy, failing to get his pay, walked over to the foreman and very coolly asked Were voit the gintlcman I sent to was t-lie proii-ipt, re I -? Y es," was Lhe prompt reply. Navvy: "Well, you needn't go, tll1! The need of comforts for Swanse-a boys serving in various parts of the world in divers capacities is very pressing just now. and it is with the object of being able to! gratify some of these needs that the hig I Rugby International match between Wales and New Zealand has been arranged to take place at 'Swansea rext Saturd.,?. It is on behalf of these boys that the' "Daily Post" appeals for liberal support from the public in their, latest enterprise. The price of admission is very low for such a big game. and we Want to ,see another such a crowd as turned Üp on Boxing Day at St.,l Helen's 011 February 3rd. I Helen's on February 3rd. j Britain's Bluejackets. 1 Hail to the Tars who brave the mighty1! I deep, 1 When raging tempests loudly roar, And thunders crash, a,d vivid lightnings 1 leap, And icy rain in drenching torrents pour. When ponderous waves lashed into seething foam Against the battle cruiser's sides dash bigh; Then the "blue jacket thinks of hearth and; home. 'And his expansive breast heaves with a sigh. Ever alert,, he scans the-hissing sea To see if will come again To fight it out" nd n()ttJrJll tr.il and fte Completely routed, steaming might and' rmain. • "A victory." tlwiy s&yp but""why so craven To .run -away.and thi s brea»k off the fight, i And lamely scramble into WiVhchnshaven. Well Tiftttered by old Englanrr:, mÜrht, All honour lo our Tars in riavy blue, All glor<- to th^m.1' fighters' to tho core; Fearing. !1-u. toe, to 'duty, ever'true. Tbev resolutely' guard old Brituiii's-^h^re.. DaUvant. C. S.J. There are now over 400 allotments at Swansea—one for cVdry 300 people. Not good enough. f The German attack 0:1 the trench at Chilly proved a frost. W.s the water-tap at your residence frozen this morning ? If not, youre one of the lucky ones! Heard in a, West Wales Council School.— Teacher:" What Is a rhombus? "—Boy A square knocked out of shape." Season i.bie Tho satisfactory freezing cut" of Snowden and too pacifists at the Manchester Labour Conierence. Barclay's new branch bank at Swansea will be located at the old Prudential buildings at the corner of St. Mary-street. A Swansea deotor mainly attributes his failure to the shortage of sugar. A similar <¡¡use is the failure of many a good cup of tea. Bravo, girls! The manner in which you have ttucii to your work these awful days and nights is the admiration of the Swan- ai-i d t 'ti, sea tram-tiavelii^g public. A New York Chinaman 111 Swansea told a correspondent that the weather is colder in Swansea this week than he ever experienced in the States. ?.<s?4?<?-?-o "The £ 2,000,WO mark has been passed." so says a London 'daily, with reference to Swansea' sWar Loan barometer. Aftsr this we have no other option but to do the need- ful. < t x A budding Brynmill gardener got up before break of day the other morning to dig over his garden. The ground was like iron, the fork broke, ana he is buying his own potatoes still. "TIle garden would be more popular if there was no hard work attached to it," said Mr A. K. Drummond in his Free Library lecture. Certainly it, is a back-aching job, but there is plenty of pleasure and profit in it. a $: Isn't it fortunate we were measured for our overcoats last October? said the cheer- ful Swansea special to his comrade as they breasted the blighting midnight blast on Terrace-road. (The reply is censored.) The Right Hon. William Brace. M.P. (H.M. Under-Secretary for Home Affairs), who addresses a Victory War Loan at Neath this (Saturday) evening, is counted among the best dressed men in the House of Com- mons. Mr. Arthur Andrews, the now junior vice-president of the Swansea. Chamber of Commeicfi, was .described by Mr. A. Moffalt as the first Labour member, for had he not used the shovel—and sncces&tady. 'too—for 15 hours' at a stretch? ° Thfcte were fto prisoners for trial at Swan- sea Borough Police Cottit,.oii Saturday mom- inp, BIH' on the county list there two cases ofdrunkenno,. The' whole bTK-i- ¡ ness was- concluded in .five minutes, much to thy relief of the blue-noses. <5XsXt>- During the cutlass exhibition by the Swansea Naval Brigade boys at the Church Hall, Clydach, one .of the lads in the general practise cxercis"" made a iiuige and the point. of his sword went through the .-c'nery. Ck>sh I wish there had been a German on the other sid? he exclaimed, after the drill wa,s ctver. -+- t>-+- One of the oldest members of the Ancient' Order of Shepherds is Councillor John1 Morris, eath: He has been through the ?lorns, of his k.dge a couple of times during his membership of (50 years, and re- cently was honoured by being elected Deputy Chief Shepherd of the Swansea United District of the A.O.S. Mr. John Phillips, Aberavon. the weil- known conductor, is of opinion that a National Eisteddfod without a "male voice ;<wnpetition is not worth holding. Ho will have his wijsh in 1918. Moreover, he believes that a two-days' "National" only gives a eirinee to the bar,rl,s, who. he think;, occupy too much time. Neath are obliging I him with an additional day. < < *'< < <>-<t-?-<? Mr. Arthur Andrews, the new junior vice-president of the Swansea. Chamber of Commerce, has done much to bring about fhe btter laeling now existing between employers and employed at the docks. It I will be recalled that on one occasion lie I accepted, the trimmers c hallenge and worked in the hold of a boat for fifteen hours. He entertains the pleasantest recol- lections of this intimate association with the men in their daily work. <t # ^1 "Ex-Weekly Boat Sailor" (Swansea) writes: — "I see by the "Post' that we are advised to eat more sprats. Very good ad- vice, too These' dainty little fish" can b^ hought at 2d. to 4d. per lb.- It wiU pav the householder to buy a stone of them, and then put a layer of salt in the bottom of a wooden pail or bucket, then a laver of sprats, then and so on. They will the" keep for weeks. Soak 111 fresh water before using, an d you will have a nice, daintv dish fur tJrea kfast." Who says it Í2n:t. colder? A Sketty cor- reapondent sends the, folfowing interesting thermometer rea.din.zs ialtitude ;.?1)H ) (h, Monday the readings w-ere Max. 30, mill 28 04. iniii. 28 W ednesday Max. W, min 22 Tliui-sda, -\lax. 28. min. 26 Friday. Max. 29, min. 25 with LhÜ:, A.E. by E. wind blowing one fancies it is even colder than it reads. The writer adds: I had to thaw- the ink to write this I >$< Their comn:ndmg officer has kindly granted Sappers Piunimer and Birt permis- sion to play at Swansea 011 February 3id against the Xeiv Zealanders, and both msn arc very keen upon making amends for their unavoidable absence in the list game. Tom Evans, the Cardiff centre, who ari-i .ved too late en Boxing Day through his car having three punctures 011 the way to Swansea, Is coming by train this time, and Lance-Cor- j! poral Tom Williams will agoiin give the home team his-va,lualile assistant* c" Peace. There oa-nnot be day without sunlight There cannot be life without breath' There cannot be nisht without da^knees' There cannot be war without death There cannot, he joy without sadness There cannot- be ills without pain, There cannot be sin without, euff'rins?' And grim death takes toll of the slain. There cannot be peace whilst the Germans Still gloat oer their victims with mirth: And, until we have smashed these monsters, There cannot be peace on the earth. No matter what neutrals may tell tis, Whatever our troubles in Greece, .Our duty lies plainly before us. We can't think of a patehed-up peace. There cannot be peace whilst there's fighting, There is HtiH a lot to Ite done: So. let neutrals do ?11 the talking, SoW._ere Sgi'in? til! thM war is won. F:t,¡u 'til victory shal! crown n?, \),Ø,th the Messi?gs of blissful peace. And to the world there comes the dawning Of the day when all wars shall cease. Kilvey, 23-1-57. D. J. fsTBPHENS. I'J-fe. 1 — i* A War Loan meeting is to he held in the Mumbles. Now for Sw ansea's Utiilion '<?< Ihe peculiar noises emanating from Swan- f-ea Day suggestive of COWs bellowing were teste of foghorns. > Police Officer (to prisoner in the dock at S, wansea Police Court one day this week): "Aro you an American?" Prisoner: No a opnsoieuuous Now, President Wilson; A Swansea officer, home on leave for a few days, teLs. a story of his search for a barber. tnouirv he was told that his servant couid cut his hair, and the latter, on being as tced whet her he was formerly scud he v,*as a hay cutter. The inexhaustible strength' of Germany that they talk abtint is Isays a correspon- I dent) like the inexhaustible odour of a bad egg. It certainly lasts a long time, but ultimately finds its grave in the dusjt-bin, milah to the relief of all concerned. I Swansea still holds the: record price for a bottle of BassE KIng 8 aJe,£15 2s. 6d. for the benefit of the Daily Post" Prisoners of War Fund. £ 12 12s. has been realised at Barrow-in-Furness, by Ald. Hardy, and £ 5 18s. in London bv the sale of similar bQttles. This gem is from a Bavarian paper One of these days we shall punish Birm- ingham as Birmingham deserves, even though our Zeppeiins have to coVer the whole of Wales to fird tb I-, sordid spot, with its rich coal mines, its blast furnaces, and it* 'skating rinks. Swansea Chamber of Commerce, the an- i nual. meeting of which is being held to-day, started its successful career many years ago, first in an unpretentious room in, Somerset- pi." and afterwards -m Adelaide-street, ?- cat u re6 c f ? e j beatures of .the present home" are photos of past presidents arranged round the umer meeting room._ nieet-iijg rooiii.  0 < & x  1 Many of the school cliildren are (?ritea ?a"erhnuh3.s ) too benumbed even to hop and skip this severe weather, a ud the Swansea Education Committee might do a worse thing than to ajlow the children, e.spe?a.Ily the little one?; to remain hi school during the ordinary playtime—not necessarily for a continuation of the studies, but to avoi4 the treacherous east -?vind. At one of the Gower FooJ Production H. LI. Priehard, of Penrict —always cool and calculated when called upon to give expertevidêlle,was', taketa somewhat unawares when asked to take the j c hairman's seat. It wag a pulpit, and he declined the honour, saying he had not yet aspired to such a lofty and dictatorial posi* tion. ) -< i Swan"'6a: war loan barometer. leaks a I, tnfle—not that the subscriptions are being with drawn or the prieet ot the loan. wfeifcE returns 51 per cent, interest, is t io fiy belcrtr^'arlty., W2 .^nteajrvt.-ihe price is likely to apjMreciaie.. No: th* j trouble is that the cold y.'oither pfevftntWl the proper drying of the smbstance used to make the tube watertight.' No workman likes to work on Smiday (writis 1, One of Them "J, L" but, imfortu- nately, Sunday is the only day we have to do anything for ourselves, ,snch as cleaning out the fowl-house and digging aod attend- i ing the garde I mys lf navjng spent many years at sea have got to look on Sunday as" a, kind of a working holiday. 1 haven't taken an allotment yet, but if I do I shall cer- tainly work when I .think fit." t A It-'tm written by tlre 'PrinGe of Wal??9 to Lord E?lint?n has been published in the Scotch papers, in which H.R. H. refers te himself as pr'l e of -Scotland.- It* is n? generally known that a.n Act of the Sc()?ttE?h Parliament was passed during the reign of James III., in 1469. which gave to the heir of the Crown the titles of Prince of Scot- land, Duke of Rothesay, Earl oL Canick, Baron of Renfrew, Lord of the isles, and Great Steward of'Scotland'.   t-?-<txi). Dr. H. R. ?im, in ail ;.authoritativa m:eoiol?git'J i review of 1916 iithe Times, savs" it was generally a wet Y':lr," but "tliat Wales, which rela- t'lvdy" ehy dong most of ita brdns. had almost a normal 'fall of rain, the excess I being only 5 per oent." Swansea is juct on the edge of two zones, one wetter (Swansea, and east of_ it) and the other dryer (Cai- marthen). Pembroke i? <'n6 of the dryest 'I zonl's in the country. and a ftrip cf the north-west Devon wast alo ha,d a dry tirre. I For ploughing the land, it was explained hv our old friend, Mr. William James, who is an old—or young—farmer, that the trac- tors were an innovation and full of possibil-i- ties for helping the farmer on the land. tio told Oowcr farmers-that about 126 had been r ordered, chiefly fWXll America, and tnen would be sent with the machines to look after them and explain the mechanism. Oae would be allocated to eh agricultural com- mittee. Mr. James said he had plenary | powers to buy the tractors, and the cost per aCl: ior loan would more than compensate | the farmer. During the past year many appeals have- il been made to the members of the Swansea. C'hamber of Comitierce on behalf of desserv- ing objects, and the response has beon magnificent and almost unbounded. The following funds may be nimed amongst at-her.,I for for Swansea Soldiers (Mayor's War Fund), £ 901 6s. 6d. Local Red Cross Hospital to June 30th, £ 822; j British Sportsmen's Ambulance Fund £ 915 France's Day Collection, £ 1,976 17s. Bd. Cigarette FLitid, --0211 (584,000 cigarettes have been sent to tbe front- during 1916, and 1,600,000 since the commencement of the war. costijvj £ 540) Lady Markba-in Lanip, £ 110. To this have to be added the results, of the appeals for the Y-M.C.A. hut week, the Salvation Army War Puijfl., the Sailors' Flag iJfe and the la-tost appeal the Y.W.C.A. Miyiy members too have given generously quite apart from these direct appeals. "080. ML* -;or Pickings from Punch." "Anybody in the Carmarthen district, says the local medical officer, "can keep a pig in the parleur \if- they keep it dean." The necessity of keeping tho parlour clean for the sake of its guest will be easily un- derstood by those who appreciate the fasti- dious taste of the pig. A Hungarian paper complains that the Government treats the war as if it we.Y'e merely a family affair. This contrasts un- favourably with the more broadly hospitable i. attitude of the Allies, who have made it abundantly clear that so far as they are concerned anyone is welcome to join in and help their side. Lord Devonport has established his own Press Bureau, and it is rumoured that the Press Bureau is about to appoint its own Food Controller. ale of great fury raged at Shen!eld 6ar!y on Tuesday morning. Much damage < \a, done in the city aiid out!ying district-? ? a. Jlumbl'ni hC'n-:gs bem? UlGod, (Yorkshire Paper.) Several others ha.T*? beeu uotic?d ?o have a tile loose.J ;i .?