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I NO SURPRISE THIS TIME. I'..,…

; SHIRKERS IN MINES. !

, I MUMBLES WILL SUPPORT.I…

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i- CAUGHT! - I I-

I -==I I MANY PRIVATIONSI…

iI ! NEATH SUNDAY TRADINC…

I LLANELLY SOLDIER ON A RAFT.…

SIX TO ONE. - I • i _.^ .!

SWANSEA ORLS CLUB.-

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SWANSEA WAR LOAN 7BAROMETER…

———————————- I " ONE GOOD…

" A MONSTROUS MACHINE." I

RAILWAYMEN'S NEW DEMAND.

DISCHARGED SOLDIER ,SUED.I

, loo.WIER P'LO.UC:-FIMEN.…

"A DRAW!"I

-I " GHOST " AT KIDWELLY.)

; GLASS .FOR SWANSEA. !

LLANELLY MAN AND HIS P'MKI…

[No title]

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SWANSEA BOY AND t GIRL WORKERS.I

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SWANSEA BOY AND t GIRL WORKERS. I ONLY ii EIGHT 79 LADS I ON MUNITIONS! GIRLS BEHIND COLD I ROLLS. In their third annual report the Swan- sea Juvenile Employment Committee say that reviewing the past. year as a whole I the local juvenile industrial world has suffered but little disturbance through the war. Girls are in more demand for errands, the two errand girls of 1915 rising to 43 in 1910. Errand lads fell from 2.54 in 19L3 to 1-36. Of the abnormal employments arising out of the war for the period under re- view, munition work absorbed oniv S boys but from the reports made at After- care meetings it would appear that a number of boys are acting a? "behindr" i" the local tinworks. Among the giris, I II errand work, formerly done by boys, iias found employment for 40; telegraph i messengers, 7: printers' helps, 7; and gas appliance work 1. It is also under- stood that young girls are being em- ployed behind the cold rolls in the tin- works. No girl under eighteen years is employed in local munition factories. The statistics given refer to Exchange placings only. There are no reliable data as to the placings effected through other agencies. The sub-committee add: "The small- ness of the number of juveniles employed! locally in abnormal occupations ought to I render their return to their usual voca- tions a comparatively easy matter. The chief difficulty with the boys will probably be on the score of the wages offered. Many of the lads have been earning ex- traordinarily high wages—varying from II ?s. per week to as much as £ 2 5s.; and. should anything like pre-war rates pre- ¡ vall when peace is restored, difficulties, no doubt, will be encountered for a time." The sub-committee recommend legisla- tive 'action to deal with the slot-gaming machinef. and that the school age should be raised to 15 years. The placmgs filled by the Exchange include: Clerks and office boys. 100; errand boys, 104; hotel boys, 13; labourers, 70: telegraph messengers 17; tinplate industry, 20: warehouse boys, 21 bookbinders. 10: brushmakers, il clerks, 23; domestics. 267 (including 189 J day girls) dressmakers, 9; girl messen- ) gers, 40 girl shop assistants, 30, and ware- house girls, 24. Total boys concerned, 369; total girls, 588. BOYS WHO TRY AGAIN. Instances of children changing jobs are given, and the record of one boy is 10 changes from- August, 1914, to August, 1915, whilst another lad had seven places in 14 months. The report as a w hole shows that much good work has been accomplished by Mr. H. R. Wakefield (the juvenile employ- ment officer) a.nd hi sub-committee. I

i "ABSOLUTE SECURITY."!

FUEL SHIPPER'S CLAIM!

THOUGHT HE WAS AII NEGRO!

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DISCHARGED FIGHTERS.

-NO CQMPENSATiON."I

SIXPENCE A DAY r

CAUGHT IN WIRE ROPE. -t

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! I SKETTY ALLOTMENTS. I