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"A DRAW!"I

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"A DRAW!" WILSONS IDEA OF I PEACE. I AMAZING SPEECH IN SENATE. President Wilson, in an to the; United States Senate on Monday, enunciat-' ed his peace policy. Referring to his 3iote I to the belligerents, lie admitted that the Entente Powers had' replied much more df" finitely than the Germanic allies, but. -he indicated that ib,, TTnited Stales- could'do no more to hasten peace. The United States, he said, would have no voice in determining the t?rms,- but "we shall have a. voice in determining whether they shall be made iasting or not." "The statesmen of both groups of belli- gerents have aid that they do not want to crush their antagonist. "]'his iitiplies 1. Peace without victory (i.e., a draw). 2. Only a peace between equals can last. 3. A guarantee of equality of rights among hig and small nations. 4. Government by consent of the .governed. (The President- oit this point gave only one concrete example when he mentiouetl a free and autonomous Poland.) 5. Otherwise whole populations will fer- ment and tight against peace. -1 ".Corridors "—for Germany? I I bis fed hi iii to enunciate the-■ following; pri 1. Every great people now struggling to develop its resources fully should be assured a direct outlet to tiie of the sea. 2. 1 1, n this cannot be done by cession of territory it may he done by the neu- tralisation of direct rights of way, i.e., by Having neutral "corridors'"— query, from (lermany to the Channel. 3. The paths of the sea in law and fact must be free. The free, constant, un- threatened intercourse of nations is an essential part of the prcce? of peac6i of development. t 4. This problem is closely counechN1 I with tlu1 limitation of naval anTiaments, l?ndin?to 5. Th Limitation of armies 1 ami piogramnies ot unitary propiii-i-tioti. These questions must be faced with the! utmost candour, and peace cannot- be had without concession and sacrifices. The statesmen of the world must plan J for peace as they planned for war. I The President concluded with a state- ment that he was proposing, as it were, a Monroe doctrine for the whole world. The general principle of this doc-trine is that every port-ion of the American Con- tinent must be free from European con- trol and vice versa.

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