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The reports of ,;1 concentration of German 'troops upoh the Swiss border, the discussion of a German effort to turn the Allied line in the West by a rush through Swiss terri- tory, and the partial mobilisation ordered by the Swiss Government, have received much publicity Within the past few days. On the face of it a German violation of Swiss neu- trality is improbable because of the serious militry disadvantages offsetting any benefit to be gained. And this because Switzerland, opened auto- 1Jnatioallv to succouring French and Italian nforces, would be n wedge driven into the • ^German and Austrian territory, and in itself ''felso turning the enemy's own position and bringing fighting to the actual German fron- tier. The Swiss Army is powerful, and has been trained and equipped for many years for mountain warfare it has elements oi Strength denied to the Rumanians, and unless Llhe Germans carried all bsfore them in a veek or two French reserves could be as- eemble-d in time to check the rush and rein- force the Swiss. A German movement through Switzerland seems a most rash and I ldangerous gamble. Hindenburg, moreover, is an t. East- erner," • and specialises in' Russia; and Russia offers the more attractive objective f- lbecause her- forces are much below the plane of her Western Allies in their equip- ment. and probabilities would appear agaiiisl,. a renewed West-ern offensive; bv the (rennan-s; but it is for that very f reason—its apparent improbaibility-that it i>might be attempted, for it i- the aim of a ?eaaer to mystify and mislead his opponent. I A blow on the West need not, however, i-tecessarilv be delivered via Switzerland or > in Southern Alsaoe. The French lino be- tweer. Champagne and the A is lie or at the j angle in the vicinity of Noyon offers a held rof action. The primary object would be no [ doubt to forestall and upset an Allied f offensive. The effort at Verdun last year f bad some success in that direction, and we | paid dearly on July 1st for the rushed British offensive. But with the conditions ] what they are upon the West, the Allies, r on the whole, would ask for nothing :>etter j than a repetition of the German efforts at Verdi-,ii. The Swiss report suggests, how- [fever, a 'blind to cover an effort in another., phere. t The sluggishness of the German operations ?in Moldavia in their later stages has no' tùonbt upset the' enemy's time-table in the E  is some dMiance from fEiast. Mackensen is some distance from reaching a% line at which he could call a halt, entrench, and draft off surplus forces, tThe Russo-Rumanian resistance is percept- i ibly hardening, and the surrender of the Greek King at Athens is a consequence. ^'Valuable as the German successes have en in Rumania, to .the Germans, they have been worth, two or three liun- v Ored pearlier. That is a common experience of j this war, in which every- side has had to put up-with much less than it hoped for, f or might even have reasonably expected, f But with 'a latgtl, force under Mackensen locked up and the end of January in sight, ?the Germans find "ome flies in the Rumanian f ointment. On the other hand, it is prob- f nble that the Russian plans -have been ,ally disorganised, for the Russian i,C"eneral Staff couldcertainly never have fallowed last autumn for the necessity of ? grafting big fOlces south to puli the! .?Rurncmi?n p?g out of its poke. ?

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