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INTO HUNS' SECOND LINE., ..........-'.j

SWANSEA HOUSEWIVES' .COAL.

POPULAR AT WAUNWEN. I

WEST -WALES CALLS. __-_____I

NAVAL

IFOR VICTORY.

IHIS FATHER'S BIBLE ON HIM.,

POTASH " AND CO. IN NEW ROLE…

AT NEATH GUARDIANS. I

RAID IN THE SNOW, I .

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RAID IN THE SNOW, I COLONIALS' FEAT DESCRIBED. GRIM. WORK IN THE DUG-OUTS. The Press Association's correspondent, telegraphing from General Headquarters, France, at 7.55 p.m. on January 17th, says :— The brilliant snow raid which was carried out by the Canadian troops this morning against the German trenches was especially interesting for several reasons. The Germans weme expecting an attack, and therefore the resistance they offered ma.y be taken as a fair measure of their powers of defence in this part of the line, and, again, the ground was virgin soil so far as aggressive tactics go. I Never having been fought over by either side since the two opposing lines dug themselves in here in October, 1914. For about ten days' ¡p68t our heavy artillery had kept up a. slow bombardment of the enemy front, with the result that all the wire de- fences were found to be most effectively cut. The ground was covered with a. white mantle at dawn this morning and I It was snowing when the men assembled to go over. A heavy smoke bombardment was launched from both flanks of our attack and the favouring wind and dene atmosphere caused this to operate most successfully. The Germans had sent out reconnoitring pa.tro]f! shortly after daybreak which were speedily driven in, and the fact that their trenches were pretty thickly held showed that they anticipated the raid. The front involved was 850 yards in width. The Canadians left their trenches shortly before 8 a.m. and the ground proved ,much better than had been. expected, and an in- tensive barrage was put down and maintained for twenty minutes to enable our men to clear the first line, where some sharp fight- ing ensued and a number of prisoners were made. I The [ Second German line, which ran at an average distance of 300 y&rds behind the front- system, W&S entered and the Canadians remained in it half-an- hour. On the left the enemy offered some re- sistance, bombing towards our troops, but was beaten back. Elsewhere in the trenches the Germans surrendered quite freely. A trench mortar used for throwing aeri al torpedoes and two machine gtina were cap- tured. When resistance was encountered in the dug-outs these were blown in, as 28 prisoners were secured in one dug-out alone. It is considered certain that the enemy casualties were very heavy, but our own were very light, and the Canadians succeeded in bringing in all the wounded. I A company commander who in civil life was an assistant professor of chemistry at Strassburg University and 100 other ranks formed the bag. These all belonged to the 11th Reserve Division, composed of Siksiana and Poles. • 1 „ ia|

!THE DAILY -TOLL._I

SEED POTATOES CHEAP.I

I SWANSEA VOLUNTEER'S BURIAL.

rLAST WEEKS OF " ROBINSONI…

---------ICURRENT FISH PRICES.J

[No title]

RUMANIA 1

"EXCELLENT BOYS."I

IF THEY CAN BE OBTAINED.,

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! GREECE.I I-

ASKING FOR TROUBLE! <-I -

SWANSEA TEACHERS' BONUS.-,"

I I BROTHERS WHO COT MORE.

I SWANSEA A.B. ON SEN MY CHREE.

I FONTARDULAiS PARS..

I •1 IFREDDIE WELSH REPORTED…

I LLANELLY CHILDREN'S SLIDE.

SWANSEA ALDERMAN.

GERMANY MUST BE ch mm.

SWANSEA SAVINGS BOOM. !

LLANSAMLET'S LOTS. I

I BANK RATE DROPS. I

I A FIGHTING FAMILY. j

I SWANSEA MAN'S PROMOTION.

IMENTIONED IN DISPATCHES.I

I _NO SHORTAGE OF MATCHES.I

[No title]

!BRITISH TROOP' TRAIN WRECKED.

I "WOMEN'S ARMY" I

I S""ANSEAPIGGERy.11

STRESS OF THEI BLOCKADE.

CAPTAIN .W. T. DAVIES AND…

ACCIDENTS AT MOND -WORKS.…

[No title]