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OUR TERMS. REPLY TO U.S.A. I ONLY CONDITIONS i OF PEACE. REPARATION AND EVACUATION. TURKEY TO GO. 'The Allif>r.' rprl' to -)fi,. NA'il,;Oii's Not,) -cas reecho ?u '!?ur.day tn '\Va?hington. The foU<'v'U)g is <* tralistaiion of the French .text:— (1) The AHied (.(.veiuments hn.\e received th< Note delivered to them on November 19 in the name of the L'mt'?d States Govern- ment. They ha,ve studied it with the care. Mt)oined upon them both by their accura.to se.n.ie of the gravity of the moment and by '.heir sincere friendship fof the American people. (2) In genera), they make a point of d°- elskring that they pay homage to the lofti- ness of the sentiments int-pu-ing the Amfn- can Note, and that they associate themselves wholehea.rtedly with the plan of creating a. -:>J.eague of the Nations to enaure peace a,nd justice throughout the world. They reo.g. niM all the advantages that would accrue to the cause of humanity a.nd civilisation by the establishment of internationa) settle- menta designed to avoid violent conflicts be- tween the nations-settlements which ought to be attended by the sanctions necessary to afsure their execution. und thus to preve-ht fresh aggressions from being made easier by an apparent security. NO PEACE POSStBLE YET. (5) But a. diacuasion of future arrange- Ments deigned to ensure a. !astin. peace presuppozes a satisfactory settlement of the present. conflict. The A))iee feel a. desire as deep at that of the United States Govern- ment to &ee ended, at the earliest possible moment, the wa.1 for which the Cantra.t Empirea are responsible, and winch inflicts i;uffèr1l1gs ?0 cruel upon humanity. But they jiid,c,P. it impossible to-day to bring about a pen' e that shall assure tr. them the repaiation, the restitution. a.nd the giia,rall- tees to which they are entitled by the aggres- ,im f,r A,hic-.h the re:-pon,ibihty lif' upon the Centra Powt'rK—a.nd of which the very principle the f,fety of lUlùpe-a ¡yace that sha)! a1!'o permit the esta blishment iV,,ii firm foundations of the future of the nations of Europe. The Allied nations are (onsciona that they are tightiiig not for se!&-h interests, but. above all, to Pafe,yuird the independence of peoples, right, and humanity. (4) The Allies are fnHy 'alive to and deplore the losses and punerings 'which tlie war causes neutrals, as well as belli- gerents, to endure; bnt thpy do not hold themselves responsible. SInCB in no way did they desire or provoke this wa tnd they make every effort to lesson such damage to the 1'uU extent compatible with the inexorable requirements of their de- fence against the violence and the pitfalls of the foe.. (5) Hence they note with satisfaction the declM&tion that as regards its origin the American communication was in no wise associated with that of the Central Powers, transmitted on December 18 by the United States Government, neither do they doubt the resolve of that Gov- ernment to avoid even the appearance of giving any, albeit, only moral, support to the responsible authors of the war- (6) The Allied Governments hold them- selves bound to make a stand in the friendliest yet in the clearest way against the establishment in the American Note of a-, likenei'ii between the two belligerent groups; this I' keness, founded upon t}¡(-, puMtC statements of the Central Powers, confticts directly with the evidence, both <tS regards the responsibilities for the past Mt<3 the guarantees for the future In m'e'nMoning this likeness President WHson certainly did not mean to associate hini- b&lf with it. THE CRtMES OF THE CENTRAL POWERS. (7) If at thiis moment there be an es- tablished historical fact, it is the aggres- sive will of Germany and Austria to en- sure their mastery over Europe and their economic domination over the world. tty her declaration of war, by the imme" dtata violation of Belgium and Luxem- burg, and by the way she has carried ort t,he siroggle, Germany haa also proved her «ystemattC contempt of every principle of humanity and of all respect for small cities, in proportion as the conflict has developed, t'he attitude of the Centra! Powers and of their Allies has t}..n a. continual challonit6 to humanity nnd tn; civi!isa.tion. Need we recall the horrors that accompanied the invasion of Belgium Md of Serbia, the atrocious rule laid up' n th,- invaded oountries, t,h ma.s"(re of hundreds of thousands of inoffensive Ar- ineuilifts, the harbahttes committed against the inhabitants of Syria., the Xepp?lin raids npon open town?, the d ,Lctio?l hy submarines of passenger tranters and merchantmen, even un(If?r Mutral nags, the cruel treatment innicted upon prisoners of war, the judicial mur- ders of Miss Cavell and of Captain r ryatt, ih. deportation and the reduction to slavery of civil populations P The acco.n- pli&hment of such a series of crimes, per- petrated without any regard for tht), umverMu reprobation they aroused, i m r) Ay expt&ins to President Wilson the protest' of the Allies. WHAT THE HUMS MUST DO. (8) They consider that the N-ite they h&Med to th< United in reply to the GenMn Note answers th<' question put by the American Government, and form.e. &< e<M*ding to the wordll of that Government. "94 avowal of their respective views as to the terms on which the wa.r might be con- ceded." Mr. Wilton wiahee no more he deeirM that the belligeren.f Powers should definf. In the ful! light of da-y. their a.inM in proaecuting the war. The Allies find no diniculty in a.Mwering thi? reque!'t. Their war aims are well hnown they hav been repeatedly denned by the heads of their various Governments. These war aims wni only be &f't forth in detai!. with all the corn-1 pensatiö11Ai a.nLd equitable indemnities for h8,rm suftered. at the moment of negotiation. But the civilised world knows that they imply, necessarily and nrst of all. the restor- atiom of Belgium, Serbia, and Montenegro, with the compensations due to them; the <fva<'ua.tion of the invaded territories in Frtnce, in Rua:ia. in Rumania, with just reparation the reorganisation of Europe, guaranteed by a stable regime and based a.t onM on rupect for nationalities and on the right to full t)$curity and lib?rtv of economic development posxeased by all peopIeK, sma,M Md (!;rM.t, and at the M.me time upon terri- tOMaJ cOtiventio'nR and internptiona.1 settle- ments Mch as to guar-ixaep land "nd ilea, frontieM &gikinf-t uf'tifiEld.ttack: the) reetitution of provii- b ''ormerly torn from Allies by force c? ;,ga;nt th wish of th#i-P ?nh<bftAnt! the liberation of die Ita. i.Mie. M !t.!so of the SIa,vp, Rum&nea. and CMcho-Slovaks from foreign domination the netting free of the populations Pub.1cct to the bloody tyranny of the Turk? and tha turn- i?ig out of Europe of the OMoman Finp;re A'. decidedly foreign to Western civiUsation. (9) The intentions of his M&jesty the Hm- neror of Rufsia. in regard to Pola.nd have ).JIf'oen cle&rly indicAted by the ma-nifesto he hu just ad(ire,4sed to hi8 Armie< NO DESICNS ON THE GERMAN PEOPLES. (0) There is no need to w,,tv that, if the Atllies desire to shield Europe from the covetous bfut&litv of Prussian mili.ta.ri&m. the and the pontical diiMLppaar- Mice of the German peoples have never, a, JhAa b<en pretended, formed p&rt of thefir d$- .igm, TI!y. desire all to ensure on the principles of liberty and justice. Md KPW the inviolable ndelity to intem'i.tiona.1 "&come.-ntA bv which the <TCvernm<'nt of Ulê United 5t4tes hitve 'êr been inured. <11) United in the pursuit of thit lorty aim, th6 AJlie are determ;.f1n. "ver.allv tttd jomtly. t-o act with aJl their power an.d to make a.11 sacrificed to carry to A yieri: otM ettd a .()nfljct upon which. i<hev are con- vinced, depend not only their own welfare and prosperity but the future of eivilifontion ??if. PARM; J<Hi. 10, 1917. SOLDtER AND SCHOLAR.) LLANELLY COUNTY SCHOOL I HEADMASTERSHIP. ¡ØO( LIEUT. THOMAS'S DISTIN- I GUISHED CAREER. < A distinguished scholastic rarrrr is that of Thomas. Welsh Reg'ment, who has been appointed headmaster if the Danelty JntHnwdiatp. Bovs' School out of 26 can- :lat(' Thf' ;In-. with capitation Born and bred in Llaneiiy. he is 44 years of age, a and. his home is at Pw f). Danetly. As a youth he a,ttprLdpd the Uanplly Copper-worb: School, the LlanpUy Scie n ce and -Art Classes and the UanfUy Af a,dpmy, und in 1891 won an Pntrai)t-(, ,eholarshIP at t!'P T:niypnity Codogf. Abcrystwyth. A keen athtfte. he (aptained the college R u _r, b i team. and actpd as rio(-eaptain of t.hp CoUoge f'rickct (,!even. In 1807 hf i.o a modern history schoiarsbip of -C80 a Tear at Jpsus Colt:g(>, Oxfo-d. As A rcsuTt of atisfa(-,tory work this wa« -iftei-ii-ir,rls Încreasro. to ,€10] a year, and hf graduated as M.A. with distinction in the honour schoo) of history and f'onomics. Me also passed his Intpr B.A. at thp London University. At Oxford he played with the Co-Hege f'Leket, Rugby and Association teams, being captain of the cricket eleven. He was also a mem- ber of the Daiydd ap Before proceeding to Oxford he held temporary teaching posts ;t the Newport Gra.mmar Sehooi. Jsie of Wiglit, and at Dunheved College. Launceston. After leaving College he taught a.t the Peny- rON; County &h00], Carnarvonshire, for a year, after which he taught for four years at the Hampstead University Co!- )ege School, London, and became second master. In 1903 he won a prize at the National Eisteddfod for an es&ay on Welsh Monasteries." He then bepame nssistant master and house master at Tient College, Derbyshire, a post he filled until July, 191o, when he received a com- mission in the Welsh Regiment, with which he is serving in this country.

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