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SWANSEA COLLIERYI SENSATION.

AMERICANS HOPELESSLY BEATEN.

"FUNNY PLACE TO GO."

NO "PACK" FOR THE PACKMAN.

SWANSEA SOLICITORS,I FATHER.

LABOUR AT THE'I -DOCKS.

IWAS INSIDE THE ENGINE.

! WORTHY SON OF WORTHY I__"FATHER.II

CURRENT FOR HARBOURi ! TRUST.…

? ,PERFECT - MYSTERY," -…

POPULAR AT -PLASMARL. 1

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" ASK FOR F-f HEM." 1

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ASK FOR F-f HEM." 1 SWANSEA MEN'S I ALLOTMENTS. THOUSAND PLOTS I AvAlLMBLt. it the present war Jesuits ,n -.ii" profitable cultivation of much uncultivated land in this and other districts all over the country much lasting good will accrue. Swansea is setting a fine lead to many towns Ol much larger dimen Sion s as regnrds allotments, and a very largely attended meeting was hcd, at the Cuildnati on Thdrsday evening, over which the Mayor (Aid. Dd. Davic-s ) pre- sided. Amongst those present were noticed Councillor E. 1. Parker, Councillor Laugharn=, Morgan, Alderman Hillard. Messrs. A. K. Drummond, Ernest Leeder, T. Meager, F. E. Tun-bridge, E. Jenkins, — Davieg (markets manager), — Blis-s (parks superintendent), Aid. J'. H. Lee, Mr. Hughes and the Town Clerk (Mr. H. Lang Coath). Thp Mayor (Aid. Dd. Da-vies) said the question of allotments wae one of vital im- portance and people hardly realised the extreme gra\ ity of the situation. By the early summer the whole country might- feel the scarcity of food, and, if the necessity arose, he would be prepared to see every park in Swansea (ploughed up. It was highly desirable in the interests of health that t-he people should have t.heir vegetables perfectly fresh, and the public would be surprised to learn chat we were paying scores of thousands for vegetables which came from Gloucester, Hereford and France when hundreds of acres in the district remained uncultivated. There was land wjthin ,a5Y reach of Swan- sea on which enough vegetables could be grown to supply half the people of Wales. He had seen as many as 10,000 baskets of strawberries arriving in Swansea in a sinele day. It would be much better for the people of Swansea if they grew their own fruit and vegetables. People who took up allotments were not only doing themselves and their families good, but were helping to do their bit for the State, because the more plentiful vegetables and fruit became, the cheaper they would be. The Btat? caJea upon everyone to add to the food i suipply. The Corporation would pro- vide those willing to take up allotments with every facility, every inducement alld guidance. They did not want p.eopte to take up land and employ prolession&l g.-trdeiiers to do the work for them. The object was to get each person taking up a piece of ground to do all the necessary work himself or get his family to assist and not to em- ploy outside labour. The public were invited to come forward and ask for amy uncultivated piece of land they desired, and, if possible, the Corporation would get it for them. (Applause.) The Corporation. were negotiating for a steam tract-or to plough up the available spaces, and would supply hokbrs of allotments with seed and manure at cosL price. They did nob went;), penny profit—(applause)--and would get profes- sional gardeners in Swansea to give people the benefit of their expert advice free. He hoped others would follow the exa,mple of Sketty people and form societies fur the pur- pose of increasing the growth of potatoes and vegetables aii o.er Lhe district. Ii Nt) Difficulty." He did not anticipate any difficulty in obtaining sufficient land for the requirements of all who wished to take up allotments. The. Corporation owned extensive and fertile lands, and many local landowners were displaying a commendable spirit of patriotism, and ottering every facility for the taking up of allotments. Nothing would awaken the people of Swansea M much A5 to t-ee the parks ploughed up for the growing of pctac.? and vGetahjes, but he d1d not think such need would arise, becau? so many offers of land had been received. People who cultivated allotments were helping Great Britain to win the War. (Applause.) Germany would have been starved out a year ago had it not been for her allotments. The harvests of the world last .year were poor and svflj- marine's were sitiking ships laden with food, and thorn was a dauiger of scarcity arising. nd wa They should cultivate a.11 available land, sc> all to reduce the strain upon the State. In the summer every uncultivated garden would be a reproach to the owner, and every thriv- ing gTswrden would be a testimony to the owner s industry and of duty tQ his country. (Applause.) Cheap Tram Tickets for Allotments. 1r. E. TnnbÓdge said the Mayor had given his practical support to the ehem{', II which was bound to be very ben&tieia). There was much land on Town Hill, Hillside, Cwmllwyd, and the Si0Gle.ton Estate which could he profitably cultivated. He would 1? someone from each street to one w hun arid arrange allotments fOr his neighbours, so that the work would be much simplified, He was pleased to learn the Mayor was arranging for the Tramway;- C-ompany to issue cheap tickets to allotment holders, lause.) Mr. Ernest Leeder remarked that the cul- tivation of vegetables? locally could be very much improved and he did not think the new Act gave quite sufficient power? in re- spect to the securing of suitable lard?.- Fair- wood Coin men, Brynmill, Cwmdcnkin and Victoria Parks were, in his opinion, unsuit- able. There were plenty of spaces available within easy reach without cutting up tho parks, and he instanced Singleton, Cw,t- llwvd and Town Hill. He was also in favour of taking over land on which farmers could not grow potatoes for lack of labour. The Mayor, in reiply, thought the parks would repay cultivation, and 1 expressed the opiriion that Town H'U was bit. inaccessible to the majority. They w--anted to bring the a llotments to the tenant as well as the ten- ant to the allotments. Tie emphasised that the work on the land must bs put in hy the holder oi the allotmert, .who should regard his task as ?> h'.bi-.u.- of !nve for the State. I Parks Not Wanted. Ald. Le2 p.;d there was no necessity for I cutting up the parks -as there was plenty of other land to met all requirements. On Town HiP alone there wa* ??cient Innj for 150 allotments and hf ho)?d that during th, next three months the whole of the town es- I tate would be let out to people for the plio, duction of vegetables. Then, again, they should keep in mind the land at Singleton. which was very suitable. He also touched u £ on the excellent results secimd in grow- ing tomatoes at the Morrieton Park last sea- on.. The Mayor rxnlaired thev would exhaust a!1 In- touching f?p ?a!'k?. Coun, Laugharne Morgan said they wanted every householder to have a patch of his own land to cultivate. Near the town there were very valuable lands for cultivation, and many farmers had more land than they could look after. > The masting was thrown open and ques- tions invited. i In reply the Mayor eaid they would nego- tiate for any land for which an application was made, and he would like to see societies springing up ?U over the borough for the cultivation oi the a.UotmMts. If peace came abruptly and the cultivatpd land was re- quired for other purposes the Board of Agriculture would pay compensation. Cor- poratiou land could he for five years, but private land, in most instances, only for on 4 year. Coun. Parker moved "That this meeting approves of the llúhcy of the Swansea Cor- Riid un- dertakei; to do all it can individuallv and collectively to make it sacce^fa]," There are, s;iid Coun. Parker, l.Ojd allotments available within easy reach of the town, and all these too old or unfit to right should trv and take a patch and cultivate it. NV Thomas seconded the resolution, and saad he woe glad to find the Corporation were going to pay aftentioii to the breeding of pige as well. The pwpooitlon was put to the meeting and carried unanimously. Different Quaiity of Land. Mr- Inevocombe remarked, that all -rroun.l was not of the same value for cultivation, and inquired if all allotment holders would be oha-rged the same: goals. The Mayor replied that gome land mirtht be let liree. The Corporation did not wis ft to make a penny profit, and where a piece of ?aud privately owned w?s required it would be let f'?r .titn'mfnt? ip,) i) t i11? afi it whs !r? to the Corporation. The meeting concluded with a vote of thanks to the Mayor. A number of allot- ments were inquired for a.t the. conclusion of the meeting. j

FINE SHOW OF I FEA frl t.…

TRAGEDY OF A TRAiN| WRECK.…

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.I MENTIONED IN DISPATCHES.,…

! NEATH COUNCIL; AND ! ! i.L.P.

PREMIER AND " S.T." !

" SERIOUS POSITION." I i

BAREFOOTED SWANSEA STREETI…

i LATE MR. 0. H. JONES.

MR. JOHN DYER'S NEW YEAR'S…

I [ LIEUT. H. LEES RANDELL.…

THE DAILY TOLL.

DEMURRAGE DIFFI* CULTY.

SOLDIERS -LITTLE ONE

RAN INTO SERGEANT'S ARrlS.

FRENCH ADMIRALTY NAil HUN…

STEALINC COAL AT SWANSEA.'

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