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As an upshot of the Rome Conference, j the Allies have sent to A thens their third Note since December 14th. without taking into account the correspondence of the previous twelve months. As an example of futility and indecision, the AUie?' deal- ings with the pro-Germans at Athens could not be excelled by Mr. Woodrow Wilson. A vea-t- ago the Greek Army was a potential danger to the Allied force based on Salonika, and a yeiir later, after all the nct-iv ity of t]-ie it is a g?eater dan?r than ever, the Ring's heart aving hardened and the -Uied Army having ad- vaneed in circumstances of so'.ae peril. W hat is at the bottom of this prosrastina- tion, the puiblic have given up attempts to conjecture but in this country we do look to Mr. Lloyd George and to Lord Mllliiei., to cut clear away from past, traditions of vacil- lation and bring matters to a head one way or another. Happily this last Note promises to be final. It is worth recalling that the British Cabinet participated in the Salonika ex- pedition against its own judgment. The statement is definitely made that its objec- lives were overruled only after a visit of Joffre to London. A distinguished French- i man. writing in "The New Europe" for December 7th. said It is no longer a, secret that if the Entente to-day has an army in the Balkans, it is due to the initiative and insistence of France. Britain followed her, not without some hesitation, after the sacrifices and disappointments caused by the ill-starred experiment of Gallipoli." The future of this expedition seems to be a legitimate subject for reconsideration, partic- ularly after the ifasco in Rumania. German correspondents at. Sofia tell us that the Bul- garians are disinclined to participate much further in the operations against Russia and Rumania now that the Dobrudja has been cleared to the Danube. That may be merely bluff intended to mislead the Allies, but granting its correctness, gel,frail has cer- tainly now to face at least the prospect of the entire dead weight of the Bulgarian army reinforcing the opposition in front of him. His chances of success are correspond- ingly reduced. The Allies have never hesi- tated in the past to cast prestige to the wind and evacuate and retreat ad libitum. Whether Macedonia is to be abandoned a.nd a garrison left at S I and the surplus f,rc,o p sl,ii,p?-d h er theatre, isa troops shipped off to ome otber theatre, is a matter for the French and British military commands to settle between them, but it "Hist be mentioned as a possibilitv of the future. The most optimistic of us hardly consider the expedition a prosperous one so I far. or its prospects bright. The defeat of Rumania entails- far-reaching consequenoes, and the latter have all been to the detri- ment of San-ail. It is, after all. to the West, to the keystone of the arch of the Central Powers, that we look this year for victory; there are few signs or probabilities of it in the Near East.

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