Hide Articles List

21 articles on this Page

PRISONERS AND I GUNS.

I--, , THE DAILY TOLL. i

THE "TANKS" IN ACTION. -/

THREE SWANSEA PORTERS.

RUMANIA

I •-:i iA LITTLE OVER FIVE…

SWANSEA OFFICERS

GREECE.

! .0i : ' HAIRDRESSERS AND…

''j ?THE KING ANDj MYSELF."…

SWANSEA VOLUNTEERS AND THEI…

PETTICOAT IN-FlUiiSE. - ft…

STRUGGLE ON DOCKSIDE.

I"POLL TOGETHER." 0

STRUCK BY CART I SHAFT.

AERIAL. I

FACTS ABOUT OUR FOOD. ———-*._-

[No title]

"WHAT, WErt AND HOW." f

News
Cite
Share

"WHAT, WErt AND HOW." f USEFUL HINTS TO GROWERS. i THE WAY TO USE AN r ALLOTMENT, Questions being asked by the amateur gardener are: What to glow, when to grow, and bow to grow, and with a view of answering the saiiie a representative of the 1.)nliv Post has obtained the following opinions from Mr. A. K. Dmmmond. who has been co-opted on 'the*1 Swansea Allotments Committee:— The primary and most important points to consider Mr. Dmmmonci) axe the Adaptability of the site, nature of the soil, and por-ition of the garden. Whether ft is within the smoKo area and a con- taminated atmosphere, or whether it is ,;tu::1tpd in an o;>cn position of purer air I -• -i .slirltc-rcc! from .the prevailing winds* whether the land, is sbnHow, poor and sickly, or whether it is in good condition with a rich and deep sub-soil. All this must be well considered, as it is of vital importance and has a direct bearing upon successful cultivation. In connection with this point it is advisable to study the nature and utility of various manures and fertilizers, and their application. The condition of the land and position of the garden should be our chief guide in the selection of the crops. In speaking of town gardens generally the space is limited and conditions any- thing but encouraging. Consequently it is hopeless to grow to any extent such crops as require sppce and open air. Much, however, can be done with town gardens, and much more ought to be done. Many are lying waste through in- difference. Surely the slumberer at thif critical time will arouse himself from lethargy, and put his heart, and soul into cultivating whatever is within his reach, beginning at home first, at the safiijPtime cultivating a knowledge of what practical and permanent gardening really means. In town gardens many small things may i be grown so useful in the household, leaving I potatoes and large croT),- for the allotment and field. The most profitable things for town gar- dens which occupy little space are:—Shal- lots. lettuce, runner and dwarf beans, radish, early carrot, vegetable marrow, onion, beet, parsley and other kinds of serviceable herbs and salads. Most of the foregoing will repay for cul- tivation under averse conditions, and where space is available, such as cabbage, savoys and green crops may be brought into use when the earlier crops are finished. For the allotment or open field, potatoes, of oourse, are of primary importance. Plant as many as possible, also peae, broad beans, all kinds of cabbage, turnips, parsnips, car- rots and other root crops. When to Crow. I Every cultivator who does not know from experience should keep a calendar of gar- dening operations which is easily obtainable at small cost. This would refresh his memory as to what should be done and when to do it. At the same time he should be discreet as to the condition of his ground and the weather, at the time of sowing or planting. It is often the case that a week delayed in pla.nting or sowing, although scheduled time, prevents lose of, crops through unfavourable climatic conditions. Bear in mind that gardening is a continual and regular occupation, needing constant at- tention and forethought, otherwise I am afraid disappointment will often damp the ardour of the most enthusiastic. To such I would say, try again, the experience is well bought. How to Crow." I Methods of cultivation are legion, and havle to be arranged in accordance with the intended crop. Books are written and theories expounded, but, after all, there is nothing equal to practical knowledge. Suf- fice it to say that with a good garden, well prepared and manured, and with good seeds sown with care and discretion, practice will soon teach the greatest novice "how to grow. I would commend to thfe notice of every amateur gardener and allotment holder a little book, concise and comprehensive, en- titled, The Making and Management of an Allotment," edited by A. S. Gait, of the University of Leeds and Yorkshire Council of Agriculture, as being the most complete andcusciul wor on this subject; it will prove invaluable to all gardeners and allot- ment holders. I may also add just one mofte '(phrase, and t-ha-t is where to grow. When you have cul- tivated your own garden, which is the first duty, and fully satisfied that you can do something further, do not exhaust energies on any waste corner of land, but take a per- manent allotment where you may get good soil, crops protected, tenure assured, and a garden for successive years or as long all it may be required.

-NEW SWANSEA LUWT.£NA-NT.…

SWANSEA AND MINISTRY OFI MUNITIONS.-