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PRISONERS AND I GUNS.

I--, , THE DAILY TOLL. i

THE "TANKS" IN ACTION. -/

THREE SWANSEA PORTERS.

RUMANIA

I •-:i iA LITTLE OVER FIVE…

SWANSEA OFFICERS

GREECE.

! .0i : ' HAIRDRESSERS AND…

''j ?THE KING ANDj MYSELF."…

SWANSEA VOLUNTEERS AND THEI…

PETTICOAT IN-FlUiiSE. - ft…

STRUGGLE ON DOCKSIDE.

I"POLL TOGETHER." 0

STRUCK BY CART I SHAFT.

AERIAL. I

FACTS ABOUT OUR FOOD. ———-*._-

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FACTS ABOUT OUR FOOD. ———- I CROPS AND CON- SUMPTION. HOW GREAT THE SHORTAGE. OUR CRITICAL PERIOD The following information in regard to the position of the food sutuply for this country will be read with considerable inter-ft. be- ing furnished by Mr. M, Jones (managing director of Messrs. Weaver and Co.. Ltd.): — The wheat crops of the world this 'ell' ar very much below those of the year 1915. The shortage is sericut;. The totals are in mil- lions of auarters. 1915. 1916. United Stat-es 108 76 Canada 47 23 Argentina. 20 I. *1 Australia.25 India;4 *40 Itidia  t <  (* Present crop.) This shows a difference of no. less than 81.000,000 quarters. British, French and Italian Crops. The crop? of the United Kingdom, Frincle anrl Italy for 1915 wfre 58,200.000 qrs., as against 56,500,000 qrs. in 1916, so that the crops of the last named countries, which are all large importers of wheat are less by 1,700,000 qrs. in 1916 than they were in 1915. According to Broom hall, during the season 1st August, 1915--31st July. 1916, import- ing countries had i-hipped to them no less than 74.4-17.000 qm. of wheat, but, this cereal year. according to the same authority, the quant,ity expected to be available for ship- ment to the importing countries, (which in- Ciude the United Kingdom, France, Italy, 1 Portugal and the neutral countries of Europe) is 55,000,000 qrs. On account of the high prices some au- thorities argue that. the consumption of bread will be less than in previous years a.nd they set this down at 10 per cent. But this is doubtful. From practical experience a Swajisea expert thinks the consumption will be greater, and not less. "And bearing in mind ihiw tne potato crop is gucn a poor one this' yicar, 1 cajunot jnia-guie a Aower con- sumpuon of bread" the says) "because lasauly the food that is substituted for bre.a.dis (potatoes. Potato Crop. The potato crop íur HHv, according to the Government re-port, for th* United Kingdom was 7,640.is4U tons; but in 1916 t4w eiop aiiiountfed to olliy 6;46tt.447 tons, showing » difference of no less than 2,071,9 tons. This is a very eerious shortage for it equals 27 per cent. of the crop of 1,415. So, as the potato crop is so short, one cannot imagine less bread being consumed, and I consider" the continues) "that the requirements in wheat of the importing countries should be quite equal to une year 1915. Provided. therefore, at the end of the cereal year the stocks of this country and the other import- ing countries should be of the same quan- tity as on the last occasion, there is a de- ficiency of 19.417,000 qrs. of wheat; but this will be reduced by about 1.000,000 qrs. by the Government's new regulation as to milling an increased percentage of flour, and may be further slightly reduced if we en- croach on our stocks by the end of the cereal year, but, being at war, it will be extremely dangerous to seriously reduce our stocks. With the continuance of the war and the submarine trouble the critical time will be a fevf months before the next harvest, wihioh in this country usually takes place towards the end of August or beginning of Septem- ber, and if we have to feel the pinch a.t all it will be during June, July, August and September. I Importance of Allotments. ( mere is a grca? movemem around Swan- sea at present for allotments, and although I do not go so far. as to say that all the parks should be ploughed up, I do think tha.t every piece of land should be planted I with potatoes and other vegetables for pota- toes can be gathered during the month cf ) July, although not of full size, it is true, and could be u when they are most urgently j wanted and so help us to tide over the short- age. Besides the shortage of crops of wheat and potatoes we have, of course, a shortage of tonnage. Ships are scarce, and as a large quantity of the wheat available has to come from Australia the võyage is very much lew- get- than from North America and Canada, from whioh countries we hare been receiving meet of our supplies for the past two years, and it will be a question whether the whole of the wheat available in Australia can be moved in time. This only makes it the more urgent that we should plant all we possibly can of crops that will bear early in this country, and I cannot imagine anything better than to ad- vooate that all the potatoes possible, and the early ones, should be put into the i ground." a

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"WHAT, WErt AND HOW." f

-NEW SWANSEA LUWT.£NA-NT.…

SWANSEA AND MINISTRY OFI MUNITIONS.-