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JOY IN GERMANY

WAGES AND LIFE LOST. I

GWAUN-CAE-GURWEN STUDENTS.…

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I A RAGGED ARMY.. I

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I A RAGGED ARMY. I British Force Fight Without Boots or Shirts. I A Press Association special despatch from Africa, dated Kondoa-lrangi, July 8 says: After the capture of lJOI- Kissals the chief trouble of General, Van de Venter was food for his troops. Wagons brought supplies to within 18 miles of the place, and there motor lorries, assigned tor the transport of am- munition, took the supplies over and brought them forward. But there was no time lost in getting after frie enemy. It was reported that the enemy had ensconced himself in a stronghold known as Umburu mountain, and had barred accass by the only path by which the mountain could be approached. Men on horseback could not creep round to take the enemy in the rear. The country of which it is the centre, is nothing but rocky range after rocky range, the mountains at> high as 7,000 feet. On March 11, General Van de Ven- ter felt tree to set out for CHume, making a. start before daylight. On his arrival, the attack was pushed under his direc- tion, and before night the place was in the hands of his troops. When th hejghts commanding Fhume had been occupied, the pursuit of the enemy, who was feeling towards Kondoa, was re- sumed, rearguard actions being common occurences. On the 16th the word was Wain For- ward," Saliiuoes, named after a pretty Sultan ruling the district, being the obecfive. This place lies in an open plain, and the surrounding hills were said to be held by the Germans. General Van de Venter came to the conclusion that the enemy was intending to work round our right and left flanks, which were protected by some low hills to the eaf:it. many ..and riveTs, and some dongas. Knowing this. the South Afri- can commander formed other plans and made a counter-attack next day, which frustrated the enemy, who was driven back for over two miles. ENEMY IN FULL RETREAT. Night came withe the fight undecided. On its resumption next morning, the at- tack was pressed to good purpose, and by ten o'clock the enemy was again in full retreat for Kondoa-Irangi. When Kondoa was reached it was discovered tha.t the enemy had retreated, leaving a rearguard toehold us back while the main body got safely a way-. ¡ The following day the enemy was speeded on his way to Dodoma. The Ger- man force hits been estimated as consist- ing of a.bout a dos&eu compunnies of lo9 men each. He later returned, having been rein/orced by five companies, and at- tacked Kondoa on May 0-10, but was re- pulsed in a night attack which must rank as one of the stiffext fights of this cam- paign. Since tlieu the enemy has been driven back from the range cornmanding the Dodoma road, and is reported to have evacuated Dodoma, after destroying much property and filling in the wells. The force that took possession of Kondoa was a ragged lot, many men having no boots, whole shirts were the exception, and ragged riding breeches no uncommon eight. It was a Falsiaffian army as re- gar-ded its clothing, and -it had as much food as a Red Indian raiding party. Horses were grazed on mealie and millet lands, and the men found food where they could, the Government paying for what- ever taken and for ail crops spoilt. In this last connection there is a story of one chief wlio, xvhen offered cashjlyer n pees—ref lsed eome, merely remarking War has

I COAL AND COKE SUPPLIES.…

NOT 1,000,000 MORE.I

RACING NEWS. )

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I INATIONAL EISTEDDFOD I ———-

BEER-OR BREAD?

BOWLS AT THE WELLS.

I GALLANT IRISH

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I COMMERCE OFTHE DAY.

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I-,-,_.._! WAR CHARITIES.…

IPPENCH MERCHANT FLEET.

I i .. GOT HIM."

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