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HATED BRITISH. ! .[

! AT THE WELSH -HOSPITALI

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WAR-CONCERT PARTY. ! i i i…

PENTECOSTALS IN CARDIGAN-'…

LOCAL VRODIRCS, I

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WOUNDED AT MONS. -0

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WOUNDED AT MONS. -0 I WELSH SOLDIER S DESPERATE BUT I SUCCESSFUL VENTURE. FIERCE FIGHTING RECALLED. Corporal Tom Morgan, who is a native of New Tredegar, and is home severely wounded from the battle of Mons, has been spending a few days as the guest of Mr. and Mrs. Pinkstone, of the Avon Vale Hotel, Aberavon. Corporal Morgan, who has sufficiently recovered from terrible injuries by shrapnel, moves about the locality bear- ing a huge scar on the right cide of his face extending from the base of the skull to the top of the ear, and with five bullet wounds in his left arm. He has seen 14 years' service, three of which were in the Grenadier Guards, during which time he acted in a special guard of honour to President Loubert during his visit to Aldershot, and during King Edward's Coronation, and to the King of Italy during his visit to India. Ba was invalided from the Grenadiers for .12 months, and afterwards joined the Royal Welsh Fusiliers, with whom he served for seven years in India, three years -in China, and two years in Burma, and at the outbreak of war was a reservist of the regiment, and employed at the Bargoed Collieries, Rhondda Valley. He was called up on the 5th of August, and went out with the first draft of the expedi- tionary forces, arriving in France on August 13th, and proceeded immediately into the fighting line. A Terrible Time. It was only after considerable pres- sure that Corporal Morgan could be in- duced to tell the story of his experience in advancing to Mons and in fighting a rear guard action in the historic retreat. He said that in advancing on Mons his regiment got into a heavy and deadly artillery fire, both by the Germans And British, the latter being caused in conse- quence of the Germans having broken through the French lines and causing almost complete disorganisation. It was a dreadfully hot corner, and we were iu this terrible position for three or four days without food or rest, and men were dropping from sheer ex- haustion and privation. It was during this experience that we had the order to retire—our lot being commanded to fight a rear-guard action to cover the retrftat of the general army. After taking up positions at Vervilliers, and later on at Septmouts, we rested for a few days before advancing to further fighting, where the enemy held very strong posi- tions. Here the fighting was of a terribly desperate nature. We advanced to a position previous to the battle of Lille, and prepared entrenchments, and it was here that I received my wounds. A Desperate Venture. The enemy were holding a farm- house, from which they were playing havoc with maxim guns, and it became imperative that this position be taken or destroyed. I and three others were told (rff at approaching darkness to set fire to the farmhouse, and we success- fully accomplished our mission, and had returned to the trenches, and were re- ceiving the congratulations of our oiffcers and men, when a shrapnel burst, inflict- ing the injurias describeiu This was on October 28th (Wednes- clay), and believe me, I shall never for- get it. From this time forward I was blind, deaf, and unconscious, and knew nothing further until I came to myself in hospital at Boulogne, where I was given up by the medical men as hopeless. I, however, gradually "recovered, and was eventually removed to hospital at Cork, where I remained until December 11th. I can assure you," emphasised the corporal. H that it was only through the care and attention of the hospital nurses that I succeeded in pulling through." On December 15th the corporal waa married to Miss Browne, a native of Cheltenham. In addition to being a soldier, Corporal Morgan is also a poet, and wrote some very clever verse in hos- pital.

WOMEN INVENTORS.

JERSEY MARINE CHILD BURNT.

BURIAL POSTPONED.I -

I'BAD SWANSEA BOYS, ! ____arifrhi