Hide Articles List

18 articles on this Page

Advertising

Howay War Savings.

Advertising

[No title]

:FEBRUARY COMPETITION.

--I---PRUDENTIAL STAFF.

[No title]

Advertising

-_._-.; The Farmers' Part.

[No title]

ASTONISHING MEMORY.

GIVE THE FOOD PROVIDER A CHANCE.

DRINK AND THE WAR. !

[No title]

[No title]

News
Cite
Share

Sir.—Reply ing to a few statements in some of vour re- cent issued regarding the prohibition question may I ask, does prohibition prohibit? Of course not. there isn't a law I on our statute books that prohibits. We have law, against murder, burglary, arson and rape, but they do I not prohibit. A law will prohibit to a certain extent, provided we have authorities to enforce it. We can make a law against liquor prohibit as much as any law prohibits. Mention was abo made that the liquor traf- fic was entitled to the same just treatment as any other legitimate traffic. I think not; because the liquor traf- fic is a curse, God himself having pronounced his woe upon it; because no drunkard.can enter heaven, and the saloon makes drunkards; because the State has no right to legalise, foster, or receive revenue from that which sends men to perdition. Then why should we compen- sate the liquor people' The Government has a right to condemn property in the interests of the people. I should like to give a few figures pertaining to the State of Kansas, U.S.A., which otters the strongest and most convincing proof of the widespread benefits of a saloon- less State. Compare Kansas annua! expenditure of $1.25. per capita for liquor with$21.00 per capita average for saloon state. Forty-eight counties did not send a single criminal t-c the penitentiary in 1915. or 87 counties did not send a patient to the insane asylum, 53 counties were without a prisoner in their jails, and 83 counties without a pauper. There are more than a dozen counties in Kansas in which no jury has been called to try a criminal case in the last ten years. Kansas has the lowest death rate in the world and the lowest percentage of illiteracy in the U.S.A. The liquor traffic is a curse, and the only remedy is prohibition. Wherever it has been tried it ha" proved a .success. Canada has adopted it by huge majorities, until every province from the Atlantic to the Pacific is dry. with the exception of a portion of Quebec. Col. H. J. Grasett, chief of Toronto police, said:—"Since prohi- bition has been enforced Toronto has become a changed city. The police stations are almost empty. From Sep- tember 15th last year the arrests from drunkenness to- tailed 1,059, while, in the same month this year, it had decreased to 214. Toronto is the largest English-speak- ing dry city in the British Empire. Canada has given over .400,000 of her best fellow s to uphold the honour of I the British Empire, and will give thousands more. She i has banished "booze" chiefly for their sakes, that they may be physically fit to do their duty in this terrible war. Yet. when they arrive in the motherland, they find her clinging tenaL'i()il"I'" to this social evil of drink. After Britain's Ailie- have renounced it as a hindrance to their objects in this struggle. Why, this mockery. that in fighting for freedom and liberty, that the sons of Britain should have to face this curse, which saps the manhood of the nation and deteriorat-c-s its fighting abilities. Recently an appeal was made to the British Cabinet, signed by 1.000 representatives of the lira in power of the nation, to the effect that the power exerted by alcohol cut through the efficiency of tl1.- nation—it weakens our fighting forces and must length- en the war. Mr M. Bark, the Russian Minister of Fin- ance. with whom Mr Llcyd George conferred, said that, since Yodb had been proliibited. the output of Russian workmen had increased from 30 to 50 per cent. Prohibition may seem a great sacrifice to many, but no sacrifice is too great when freedom and honour are at take and when the brave boy are gh ing tin it- lives in the battlefields. It is our duty that we place no hind- ranee in the way of our fighting forces, that they may effectively throw their whole strength against the • enemy. There is no doubt that the liquor question was one of the reason- which brought about the collapse of the late Cabinet, the failtirt- to recognise this hind- ) rancein the way of our fighting force*, and that they mav who had the courage of his convictions to confess that i the enemy was within the nation's own camp has hl.Pl1 called to lead the way and aY" his nation in time of j peril. He saw what other- -aw, that the liquor traffic must be restricted or prohibited, if the cause of the j Allies should triumph. I believe Britain has found her j man—"the man of the hour." He finds a nation stand- ing on the parting of the ways. On one hand, ineffi- j briety. efficiency and victory, and, on the other, ineffi- ciency and defeat. The task of the new Premier is al- most overwhelming, but. with the support of a nation freed from all hindranoas and the abolition of the greatest of them, the sturdy Welshman from the hills of Wales will not falter, but will bring England from the mighty conflict a better and a nobler nation. As to Alberta's prohbition success, the result of pro- hibition was to the effect that in six of the largest towns, during the last six months .of the year, 1915, there were 1.159 arrests for drunkenness, whilst, during the same months in the year 1916, under the prohibition law, there were 155 arrests, representing a decrease of 1.004. or 87 per cent. Yours, &c.. Warna, Alherta, Canaa TOM M. WILLIAMS. Warner. Alberta, Catiadii, Jan. 30'17.

Advertising

[No title]

Advertising