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Howay War Savings.

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:FEBRUARY COMPETITION.

--I---PRUDENTIAL STAFF.

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-_._-.; The Farmers' Part.

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ASTONISHING MEMORY.

GIVE THE FOOD PROVIDER A CHANCE.

DRINK AND THE WAR. !

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Sir,—Will you allow me to state a few facts collected from reliable sources. "Drink has destroyed as many live's during the war as submarines, and absorbed as much tonnage. The liquor bill for 1916 will be up bv another £ 18,000,000, and will exceed £ 200,000,000. Since the war began, more than t450,000,000 will have been spent in alcoholic drinks. Few, even among those who in the past have opposed Temperance reform, would be inclined to deny that the immense sums swallowed vear- ly by the trade represent a waste of national power. How far, at a time when the duty of economy is being enforced from the house-tops, can such a waste be al- lowed to continue uncheckedr Yet the manufacture of beer is a direct as well as a vast indirect waste of bread. Is it reasonable to call upon the individual to restrict his consumption of bread, and yet permit an industry to diminish the available supplies uncontrol- led ?" "Alcohol can only be made by the destruction of starch and sugar, the two great energising foods of the human race. The breweries and distilj?rie,? are there- fore nothinK more and nothing less than destroyers of food. The plain fact about drink and foed L that since the war began we could have had three a.nd a half millions mere tons of food in this eountrv if there had been no drink trade. (Last year 65,000,000 bushel- of grain were used in the drink trade). The drink trade uses directly the labour of 500,000 workers; one and a. half million tons of coal; and a million acres of land. In Kent, 30.000 acres of the best land in the country are devoted to growing hops to make beer. Since the war started, 50,000.000 tons of stuff have had to he carried by road and rail to keep the drink trade going." Who can deny that breweries and distilleries are a source of deterioration in every wav. and' are Productive of neither food nor raiment? A clergyman who did not believe in total abstinence was once asked to take the chair at a temperance lecture. On rising to give his operiins address he remarked that though tlw teetotalers were a. very respectable and 'well.mean- ing people, he had never seen his way to join them. Meanwhile a drunken man had staggered into the room and on hearing the reverend gentleman's last words, he cried out. "Hurrah, the clergyman's on our side!" The chairman stood till for a minute, and then said. "Well John, I never saw it in that light before, that is the best argument I have ever heard. From this time forth I haIl not be on the drunkard's side, but on the side of the Temperance Cause. If I only take a few glasses during the year I shall be on the drunkard's side." 'Cvmro' would do well to quit the drunkard's side also. He need not think that a good and able man like Air Llcyd George is too busy to pay attention to one of the greatest evils of our country. I hope he mav be abl^ to abolish the production of drink, and bring about thf greatest reform for our Island. Yours, etc., A VOICK FROM w.tl LS.

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