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Howay War Savings.

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:FEBRUARY COMPETITION.

--I---PRUDENTIAL STAFF.

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-_._-.; The Farmers' Part.

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ASTONISHING MEMORY.

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ASTONISHING MEMORY. bir,-There was an entertainment given at Salem Bap- tist Chapel, Hay, on Shrove Tuesday. One item of the programme was of wonderul interest—not only to the persons there present, but as a concrete example of the way history, ballads and legends were handed down the ages, when writers were few, and writing materials of parchment, etc., scarce. Fanny Price, of Hay, born October 4th, 1834, when she was 7 or 8 years of age, was orally taught a poem of 72 verses called "The Gospel Chariot." She never saw a printed, or any other copy of the verses. On Shrove Tuesday 1917, Fanny Price, now Mrs James Ammonds, in her 8rd year, recited with the greatest fluency the 72 verses of the piece she had been taught about 76 years ago—and she has had no copy from which to refresh her memory. About four years ago Mrs Ammond's son in America wrote to his mother and asked her to get some one to write out "The Gospel Chariot" from her dictation. This was done fortunately before the writing was sent to Amer-, ica, I saw it, and made a copy for myself, of which Mrs Ammonds was not aware, and this is how I am able to vouch for the astonishing accuracy of her memory. I don't think she deviated one word from the copy I made of her dictation of the verses to her neighbour about the year 1913. It is curious in this twentieth century to come across this living confirmation of the way history, poetry and literature generally was trans- mitted from generation to generation when the world was young. Yours, etc.. Tre'r Gelli. Hay, Feb. 21. 1917. R. M. BROAP MORGAN.

GIVE THE FOOD PROVIDER A CHANCE.

DRINK AND THE WAR. !

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