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CASE OF THE BARALONG.

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CASE OF THE BARA- LONG. WILD TALK Ur REPRISALS." "Press Association War feervico:. AMSTERDAM, Paturd-ir. The Cologne Gazette" publishes the test. ] of the German reply to Siv T?.. Greys pro- i posal in the EaraJong case. The German Government- protests moft strongly against the unheavo of and un- proved accusation asainst the Herman j Army and Navy which -as observed during the present war principles of international law And humanity; and the- authorities take car6 that all violations thereof will be care- fully investigated; and severely punished. Dealing with the three <:acs brought against Germany by Pir E. Grey, the reply eays they were investigated in due course, And adds that the commander of the sub- ttuvrine who sank the Arabic acted as be did tiecause, in view of the circumstances, he was compelled to the conviction that the ifceamer was about to ram the submarine, tre therefore believed be was acting in justi- Bible self-defence. It Happened This Way," The case or attacK 1w y crermsn torpeuo flestroyer on a British submarine in Danish -waters happened in this way. A fight occurred in those waters between the two war vessels, and the submarine defended it- self by gunfire. The cLargrc of violating Danish waters cannot properly he advanced by England, whose naval forces in a num- ber of oases, have attacked German fillips in neutral waters. As regards the destruction of ttic steamer Buel. the German submarine applied moa- suree 0; reprisal announced by the German Gcvernment in February last year. These measures arc in accordance with inter- national law, since England endeavoured, by illegally paralysing the legitimate maritime trade of neutrals with Germany, to cut cS all imports from the latter and bring the German proplo to starvation. Suitable re- prisals may be taken against illegal actions. In all three cases the German naval forces had in view only the destruction of hostile ibips, and in no way the destruction of help. less persons who were endeavouring to sate themselves. The contrary assertions by thc- British Government must be most absolutely repudiated as untrue. The German Government considers that it Must reject the Ermsh proposal to submit tile unee above-mentioned cases, together with the Baralong ca,e, to a court composed of American naval officers. Tt tabes up tne standpoint that thel occusations raised against members of the German forces tl,.Pir ox,-P. ompe- must be investigated by their own compe- tent authorities, and that thie ofiers every guarantee for impartial judgment and, if necessary. just punishment.' r Germany does- not present any other de- mand to the British Government, in the Baralong case, because she does not doubt that a war tribunal composed of Britieh naval officers would suitably punish such a cowardly and treacherous murder. The de- mand made hv Germany was all the mor. justified, iays the reply, because of the sworn statements of Americans. Thus neutral evidenoe -which was laid before the British Government practically made un- questionable the guilt of the commander and crew of the Barailonp. The British method of replying to the German memorandum, it gays, corresponds neither in form nor in its contents with the e?rion?nasa of thD situation, and makes it impossible for the German Government to diaeu&s aff&irs further w,??li England. The Germa.n Government, therefore, declares that the final regnh of the negotiations is that the Brith;h Government, under i;)ti? pretexts, has left unfulfilled the; just demand for investigation, an,1 thereby made itself 1 responsible for a crime which is a Disgrace to international Law and to humanity. Evidently, says the reply, the British J Government, so far as German submarines are concerned, will no longer observo one of the first -ules of war, namely, to spare j fnraniefe who are ¡pat out of action, hoping thus to hinder German submarines from pur- suing their legally recognised cruiser war. The reply terminates by saying that Oer- many sees herself obliged to .take in ha Dd the punishment of this unexpiated crime and •o devi-f repiisvils to meet the British ehal- lenge.

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